The American Cyclopædia (1879)/Ohio (county)

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The American Cyclopædia
Ohio (county)
Edition of 1879. See also Ohio County, West Virginia; Ohio County, Kentucky; and Ohio County, Indiana on Wikipedia, and the disclaimer.

OHIO. I. A N. W. county of West Virginia, bounded E. by Pennsylvania and W. by the Ohio river, and drained by Wheeling and other small creeks; area, 140 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 28,831, of whom 444 were colored. Its surface is hilly and the soil fertile, especially along the Ohio. Most of the land is well adapted to pasturage. Mines of bituminous coal among the hills are extensively worked. It is intersected by the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 42,276 bushels of wheat, 225,465 of Indian corn, 97,372 of oats, 26,967 of barley, 46,748 of potatoes, 120,135 lbs. of butter, 175,124 of wool, and 8,389 tons of hay. There were 1,637 horses, 1,585 milch cows, 1,493 other cattle, 47,201 sheep, and 4,153 swine; 23 manufactories of iron in various forms, and many other manufacturing establishments, chiefly at the capital, Wheeling. II. A W. county of Kentucky, bounded S. by Green river, which is here navigable by steamboats, and intersected by Rough creek; area, about 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,561, of whom 1,393 were colored. It has an undulating surface and a fertile soil, and contains iron ore and coal. The Elizabeth and Paducah railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 40,321 bushels of wheat, 577,371 of Indian corn, 96,268 of oats, 28,033 of Irish and 16,870 of sweet potatoes, 177,229 lbs. of butter, 42,567 of wool, 3,392,633 of tobacco, and 3,564 tons of hay. There were 5,325 horses, 3,801 milch cows, 6,329 other cattle, 21,308 sheep, and 30,646 swine. Capital, Hartford. III. A S. E. county of Indiana, bounded E. by the Ohio river, which separates it from Kentucky, and N. W. by Laughery creek; area, about 90 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,837. The surface rises in some places into high hills, but in very few places is it too much broken for cultivation. The soil, resting mainly on blue limestone, is fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 61,833 bushels of wheat, 12,231 of rye, 221,565 of Indian corn, 10,224 of oats, 13,581 of barley, 89,379 of potatoes, and 6,489 tons of hay. There were 1,234 horses, 1,150 milch cows, 1,286 other cattle, 2,742 sheep, and 4,342 swine. Capital, Rising Sun.