The Dictionary of Australasian Biography/Bonython, John Langdon

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

Bonython, John Langdon, J. P., was born in London, Oct. 15th, 1848. He is a son of George L. Bonython, and is descended from an old family—the Bonythons of Bonython, and Carclew, in Cornwall. At an early age he went with his parents to South Australia, and was educated in Adelaide. He joined the literary staff of The Advertiser, which is the popular journal of South Australia. Having served as reporter and sub-editor, he became some years ago the editor, which position he now fills. In 1879 he entered the proprietary of The Advertiser and associated journals (The Express, an evening paper, and The Chronicle, a weekly paper); and eventually the firm, which had been Barrow & King, became Burden (Mr. F. B. Burden, J.P.) & Bonython. When the Adelaide School Board was appointed, Mr. Bonython was nominated a member. In 1883 he was elected chairman, and at the present time holds that office. He was a member of a board appointed by the Government in 1886 to consider the question of technical education. As recommended by this Board a School of Mines and Industries was established, and Mr. Bonython was made a member of the Council, which included some of the best known and most representative men in the colony. The first chairman, Dr. Cockburn, having soon after his appointment to resign through becoming Premier, Mr. Bonython was unanimously elected to the position, which he now occupies. He was one of the local commission for the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition of 1888. He is a justice of the peace, a member of the council of the South Australian branch of the Geographical Society of Australasia, and vice-president of the South Australian Cornish Association. Mr. Bonython is recognised as a shrewd politician, who has probably had as much influence on the legislation of the country as men actively engaged in politics. To his untiring energy the success of the journals with which he is connected is largely due.