The House of the Wolfings

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The House of the Wolfings (1889)  (1889) 
by William Morris

THE HOUSE OF THE WOLFINGS

A TALE OF THE HOUSE OF THE WOLFINGS AND ALL THE KINDREDS OF THE MARK WRITTEN IN PROSE AND IN VERSE


by William Morris

Whiles in the early Winter eve
We pass amid the gathering night
Some homestead that we had to leave
Years past; and see its candles bright
Shine in the room beside the door
Where we were merry years agone
But now must never enter more,
As still the dark road drives us on.
E'en so the world of men may turn
At even of some hurried day
And see the ancient glimmer burn
Across the waste that hath no way;
Then with that faint light in its eyes
A while I bid it linger near
And nurse in wavering memories
The bitter-sweet of days that were.

Contents[edit]


Footnotes[edit]

[1] Welsh with these men means Foreign, and is used for all people of Europe who are not of Gothic or Teutonic blood.
[2] i.e. Foreigners: see note [1].