The Lost Stradivarius

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The Lost Stradivarius  (1895) 
by J. Meade Falkner
The Lost Stradivarius (1895), by J. Meade Falkner, is a short novel of ghosts and the evil that can be invested in an object, in this case an extremely fine Stradivarius violin. After finding the violin of the title in a hidden compartment in his college rooms, the protagonist, a wealthy young heir, becomes increasingly secretive as well as obsessed by a particular piece of music, which seems to have the power to call up the ghost of its previous owner. Roaming from England to Italy, the story involves family love, lordly depravity, and the tragedy of obsession, all conveyed in a "high" serious tone not uncommon in late Victorian literature.
Excerpted from The Lost Stradivarius on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The Lost Stradivarius

by J. Meade Falkner


Letter from MISS SOPHIA MALTRAVERS
to her Nephew, SIR EDWARD MALTRAVERS,
then a Student at Christ Church, Oxford.
13 Pauncefort Buildings, Bath,
Oct. 21, 1867.
MY DEAR EDWARD,
It was your late father's dying request that certain events which occurred in his last years should be communicated to you on your coming of age. I have reduced them to writing, partly from my own recollection, which is, alas! still too vivid, and partly with the aid of notes taken at the time of my brother's death. As you are now of full age, I submit the narrative to you. Much of it has necessarily been exceedingly painful to me to write, but at the same time I feel it is better that you should hear the truth from me than garbled stories from others who did not love your father as I did.
Your loving Aunt,
SOPHIA MALTRAVERS

To Sir Edward Maltravers, Bart.

"A tale out of season is as music in mourning."
—ECCLESIASTICUS xxii. 6.

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This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1932, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.