The Merry Muses of Caledonia/Tweedmouth Town

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TWEEDMOUTH TOWN.

An old song apparently of English origin.

Near Tweedmouth town there liv'd three maids,
 Who used to tope good ale;
An' there likewise there liv'd three wives,
 Who sometimes wagged their tail;
They often met to tope an' chat,
 An' tell odd tales of men;
Cryin' when shall we meet again an' again,
 Cryin' when shall we meet again.


Not far from these there liv'd three widows,
 With complexions wan and pale,
Who seldom used to tope an' bouse,
 An' seldom wagged their tail.
They sigh'd, they pin'd, they griev'd, they whin'd,
 An' often did complain,
Shall we, quo' they, ne'er sport or play,
 Nor wag our tails again an' again,
 Nor wag our tails again.


Nine northern lads with their Scots plads,
 By the Union, British call'd,
All nine inch men, to a bousing came,
 Wi' their brawny backs I'm tald.
They all agreed to cross the Tweed,
 An' ease them of their pain;
They laid them all down,
An' they f——d them all round,
 An' crossed the Tweed again an' again,
 An' crossed the Tweed again.