The New York Times/Nurses stuck to post

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Nurses stuck to post  (1919) 
The New York Times, Sept. 4, 1919.

NURSES STUCK TO POST

American Girls Refused to Abandon Charges After Armenian Massacre.

CONSTANTINOPLE, Aug 12. (Correspondence of Associated Press.)--Two American nurses, Miss Margaret Mack of Hillburn, N. Y., and Miss Ruth Stuart of New York City, working for the American Commission for Relief in the Near East, declined to abandon the sick and wounded at Shusha, Armenia, after having survived a massacre by Tartars of 700 of the Christian inhabitants of the town, according to a letter just received here by Major David G. Arnold of Providence, R. I., Director of the commission. The letter read:

"Our doctors and nurses were in the midst of the fight, but were unharmed. On advice from General Beach I recalled the two nurses. They came reluctantly, and begged to remain at their station, as there was an urgent need for them among the survivors. The spirit Miss Mack and Miss Stuart have shown has been splendid, and I felt that they should be allowed to return if they went as volunteers, understanding the serious situation. They signed papers to the effect that they knew the danger, and that they were returning to their work at their own request."

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