The Union Cruiser

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The Union Cruiser
by Unknown
An Irish unionist anti-Irish home rule ballad written during the early 20th-century. The ballad's name refers to the ship used in the Larne gun-running. Set to the tune of The Yellow Rose of Texas.



1.
Far across the stormy ocean in our happy Northern home,
Where our country men are arming to resist the wiles of Rome,
I can see the Union Cruiser in the harbour of Belfast,
And the Orange flag of Liberty is floating on her mast.

2.
Every city, town and village in our happy Northern coast,
Is preparing to defend itself against the Redmond hosts,
From the shores of Carrickfergus to the margins of Lough Neagh,
There’s a hundred thousand Orangemen preparing for the fray.

3.
Magherafelt and Castledawson, Maghera and Tobermore,
Are as eager for the conflict as they were in days of yore,
Culnady and the Tamlaght boys still loyal to the throne,
Are responding to the battle cry that comes from Portglenone.

4.
The fighting men of Garvagh and the Sprigs of old Kilrea,
With their armour brightly burnished and their flags and banners gay,
Send a ringing call to arms rolling o’er our native hills,
That was heard at Ballymoney, Aghadowey and Bushmills.

5.
Every loyal heart is throbbing in the town of stout Coleraine,
Where the men of proven value are assembled on the plains,
Cool courageous, self reliance from the lips of everyman,
Brings a cheer of bold defiance rolling o’er the river Bann.

6.
From the crest of Keady mountains I can see the bayonets gleam,
Hear the roll of martial music in the valley, winding stream,
Where the loyal Limavady men that never feared a foe,
Are resting on their arms in the valley of the Roe.

7.
In the streets of Londonderry there’s a grand inspiring scene,
Where our ‘prentice boys are arming to defend our Maiden Queen,
And our walls are stoutly guarded by defenders of the soil,
And their cry of ‘No Surrender’ echo’s o’er the river Foyle.

8.
You Loyal Sons of Ulster who have of your valour shown,
On the crimson field of battle as defenders of the throne,
Put your trust in God above, be courageous calm and cool,
And the North bid bold defiance to John Redmond and Home Rule.

This anonymous or pseudonymous work is in the public domain in the United States because it was in the public domain in its home country or area as of 1 January 1996, and was never published in the US prior to that date. It is also in the public domain in other countries and areas where the copyright terms of anonymous or pseudonymous works are 70 years or less since publication.