Thomas Lindsay Letter circa 1800

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Thomas Lindsay Letter circa 1800
by Thomas Lindsay
Source: Handwritten original in the private collection of the Chambless Family. Transcribed to softcopy by Susan D. Chambless, February 11, 1999.


circa 1800, From Thomas Lindsay to his mother, Hellen Buchart

To: Mrs Hellen Buchart, New Rattray, North Britian

in another hand: Mrs Hellen Buchart

Dear Mother

I received your letter dated march in month of May & wrote you at same time since which I have not heard from you it is something unfortunate that have never been able to find Mathewson or Leslie indeed there is strong presumption When they that wrote forgets to write that silence & inaction are all the powerw they are in possession of it would have given me great satisfaction had I been able to write you better news and depend upon it. Will still make all the enquirey in my power even tho there is little hopes of success

We have had a very sickly fall and many strangers fell a victim to the feavers raging furie

Some Ships from Europe lost 9/10 of their whole Ships crew it was certain death for any person in the country to come to Charleston though few of the inhabitants of Charleston suffered yet they who came from the interior parts of the State last winter died almost all to a man which frightened them so much that I question if many will dare to come to Town next summer

I have lived these 4 months past with Mr. Lewis Cameron and should be sorrey to Change my situation but he has nomore use for me having a brother lately from Scotland I shall write as soon as I am fixed in any other place

I have great reason to Thank god I can get more Employers than I can attend. our Crop of cotton is very good it sold here at 3/ when it first came to market 1/8 to 2/ is the highst now and even then some planters will make from 12 to 18 Thousand pounds Sterling on Cotton this year------------- Rice sold all Last summer from 7/ to 9/ now sells at 16/ & 18/ per Hundred pound

Tobacco last year sold from 7 to 0 dollars per Cent & Now sells from 4 to 5 dollars per Cent

Our great and good Washington died on the 14th December 99 never was their greater Show of grief than on this occasion he may be called the Father Saviour and Servant of This new World as far as Mortal Man has a right to Such a Title and of the honest the disinterested and the great joind to the sincere cristian may with propriety be be Called the noblest work of god it is doubtfull whether any Man now living possesed them in higher degree than Worthy Washington as i Expect to write you soon i remain yours &tc Thos Lindsay please write me a few of the comon transactions with you

On back: Give my Compliments to John McKay & family John Chrighton & family A. Grieve &tc and all others