Treasure Island (1911)

From Wikisource
 
Jump to: navigation, search
For other versions of this work, see Treasure Island.
Treasure Island  (1911) 
by Robert Louis Stevenson
First published as a book in 1883, it was originally serialised in the children's magazine Young Folks between 1881-82 under the title "Treasure Island, or the mutiny of the Hispaniola". This 1911 edition, published by Charles Scribner's Sons in New York, is illustrated by Newell Convers Wyeth.

Note: The scans on which these pages are based are missing the captions for some illustrations, probably due the fragility of the translucent pages on which the captions were printed. The text of the missing captions can be found in the Illustrations section at the bottom of this page.

Title page of Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, Illustrated by N. C. Wyeth, published in New York by Charles Scribner's Sons, MCMXI.  Painted illustration of a group of pirates and a skeleton on a cliff with the image of a ship in the clouds.

page

Copyright, 1911, by

Charles Scribner's Sons


Published September, 1911


"The Scribner Press", logo.

page

TO

LLOYD OSBOURNE,

AN AMERICAN GENTLEMAN,

IN ACCORDANCE WITH WHOSE CLASSIC TASTE

THE FOLLOWING NARRATIVE HAS BEEN DESIGNED,

IT IS NOW, IN RETURN FOR NUMEROUS DELIGHTFUL HOURS,

AND WITH THE KINDEST WISHES,

Dedicated

BY HIS AFFECTIONATE FRIEND,

THE AUTHOR

 

page

TO THE HESITATING PURCHASER

If sailor tales to sailor tunes,
 Storm and adventure, heat and cold,
If schooners, islands, and maroons
 And Buccaneers and buried Gold,
And all the old romance, retold
 Exactly in the ancient way,
Can please, as me they pleased of old,
 The wiser youngsters of to-day:


—So be it, and fall on! If not,
 If studious youth no longer crave,
His ancient appetites forgot,
 Kingston, or Ballantyne the brave,
Or Cooper of the wood and wave:
 So be it, also! And may I
And all my pirates share the grave
 Where these and their creations lie!

page

CONTENTS


THE OLD BUCCANEER

CHAPTER PAGE
I. The Old Sea Dog at the "Admiral Benbow" 3
II. Black Dog Appears and Disappears 11
III. The Black Spot 19
IV. The Sea-Chest 27
V. The Last of the Blind Man 35
VI. The Captain's Papers 42

THE SEA COOK

VII. I go to Bristol 53
VIII. At the Sign of the Spy-glass 59
IX. Powder and Arms 66
X. The Voyage 73
XI. What I Heard in the Apple Barrel 80
XII. Council of War 88

MY SHORE ADVENTURE

XIII. How my Shore Adventure Began 97
XIV. The First Blow 104
XV. The Man of the Island 111


THE STOCKADE

XVI. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: How the Ship was Abandoned 23
XVII. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: The Jolly-boat'S Last Trip 130
XVIII. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: End of the First Day's Fighting 136
XIX. Narrative Resumed by Jim Hawkins: the Garrison in the Stockade 142
XX. Silver's Embassy 150
XXI. The Attack 157


MY SEA ADVENTURE

XXII. How my Sea Adventure Began 167
XXIII. The Ebb-Tide Runs 175
XXIV. The Cruise of the Coracle 181
XXV. I Strike the Jolly Roger 188
XXVI. Israel Hands 195
XXVII. "Pieces of Eight" 205

CAPTAIN SILVER

XXVIII. In the Enemy's Camp 215
XXIX. The Black Spot Again 225
XXX. On Parole 233
XXXI. The Treasure Hunt—Flint's Pointer 242
XXXII. The Treasure Hunt—The Voice Among The Trees 251
XXXIII. The Fall of a Chieftain 259
XXXIV. And Last 267

page

ILLUSTRATIONS


FACING
PAGE
Captain Bill Bones 4
All day he hung round the cove, or upon the cliffs, with a brass telescope
Captain Bones Routs Black Dog 16
One last tremendous cut which would certainly have split him to the chin had it not been intercepted by our big signboard of Admiral Benbow
Old Pew 38
Tapping up and down the road in a frenzy, and groping and calling for his comrades
Jim Hawkins Leaves Home 58
I said good-bye to mother and the cove
Long John Silver and Hawkins 76
To me he was unweariedly kind; and always glad to see me in the galley
Preparing for the Mutiny 102
Loaded pistols were served out to all the sure men
Ben Gunn 112
I saw a figure leap with great rapidity behind the trunk of a pine
Captain Smollet Defies the Mutineers 138
Then, climbing on the roof, he had with his own hand bent and run up the colors
The Attack on the Block House 162
The boarders swarmed over the fence like monkeys
The Fight in the Cabin 178
It showed me Hands and his companion locked together in deadly wrestle
Israel Hands 204
"One more step, Mr. Hands," said I, "and I'll blow your brains out"
The Black Spot 226
About half way down the slope to the stockade, they were collected in a group
The Hostage 244
For all the world, I was led like a dancing bear
The Treasure Cave! 268
I was kept busy all day in the cave, packing the minted money into bread-bags


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).