United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity

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United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity  (1992) 
by: United Nations

CONVENTION[1] ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY


Preamble


 The Contracting Parties.
 Conscious of the intrinsic value of biological diversity and of the ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic values of biological diversity and its components.
 Conscious also of the importance of biological diversity for evolution and for maintaining life sustaining systems of the biosphere.
 Affirming that the conservation of biological diversity is a common concern of humankind.
 Reaffirming that States have sovereign rights over their own biological resources,
 Reaffirming also that States are responsible for conserving their biological diversity and for using their biological resources in a sustainable manner.
 Concerned that biological diversity is being significantly reduced by certain human activities.
 Aware of the gênerai lack of information and knowledge regarding biological diversity and of the urgent need to develop scientific, technical and institutional capacities to provide the basic understanding upon which to plan and implement appropriate measures.
 Noting that it is vital to anticipate, prevent and attack the causes of significant reduction or loss of biological diversity at source.
 Noting also that where there is a threat of significant reduction or loss of biological diversity, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing measures to avoid or minimize such a threat.
 Noting further that the fundamental requirement for the conservation of biological diversity is the in-situ conservation of ecosystems and natural habitats and the maintenance and recovery of viable populations of species in their natural surroundings.
 Noting further that ex-si tu measures, preferably in the country of origin, also have an important role to play.
 Recognizing the close and traditional dependence of many indigenous and local communities embodying traditional lifestyles on biological resources, and the desirability of sharing equitably benefits arising from the use of traditional knowledge, innovations and practices relevant to the conservation of biological diversity and the sustainable use of its components.
 Recognizing ai so the vital role that women play in the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity and affirming the neea for the full participation of women at all levels of policy-making and implementation for biological diversity conservation.
 Stressing the importance of, and the need to promote, international, regional and global cooperation among States and intergovernmental organizations and the non-governmental sector for the conservation of biological diversity and the sustainable use of its components.
 Acknowledging that the provision of new and additional financial resources and appropriate access to relevant technologies can be expected to make a substantial difference in the world's ability to address the loss of biological diversity.
 Acknowledging further that special provision is required to meet the needs of developing countries, including the provision of new and additional financial resources and appropriate access to relevant technologies.
 Noting in this regard the special conditions of the least developed countries and small island States,
 Acknowledging that substantial investments are required to conserve biological diversity and that there is the expectation of a broad range of environmental, economic and social benefits from those investments.
 Recognizing that economic and social development and poverty eradication are the first and overriding priorities of developing countries.
 Aware that conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity is of critical importance for meeting the food, health and other needs of the growing world population, for which purpose access to and sharing of both genetic resources and technologies are essential.
 Noting that, ultimately, the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity will strengthen friendly relations among States and contribute to peace for humankind.
 Desiring to enhance and complement existing international arrangements for the conservation of biological diversity and sustainable use of its components, and
 Determined to conserve and sustainably use biological diversity for the benefit of present and future generations.
 Have agreed as follows:

Article I. Objectives


 The objectives of this Convention, to be pursued in accordance with its relevant provisions, are the conservation of biological diversity. the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources, including by appropriate access to genetic resources and by appropriate transfer of relevant technologies, taking into account all rights over those resources and to technologies, and by appropriate funding.


ArticIe 2. Use of Terms


 For the purposes of this Convention:
"Biological diversity" means the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part: this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems.
"Biological resources' includes genetic resources, organisms or parts thereof, populations, or any other biotic component of ecosystems with actual or potential use or value for humanity.
"Biotechnology" means any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.
"Country of origin of genetic resources" means the country which possesses those genetic resources in in-situ conditions.
"Country providing genetic resources' means the country supplying genetic resources collected from in~situ sources, including populations of both wild and domesticated species, or taken from ex-si tu sources, which may or may not have originated in that country.
"Domesticated or cultivated species' means species in which the evolutionary process has been influenced by humans to meet their needs.
"Ecosystem" means a dynamic complex of plant, animal and micro-organism communities and their non-living environment interacting as a functional unit.
"Ex-situ conservation" means the conservation of components of biological diversity outside their natural habitats.
"Genetic material" means any material of plant, animal, microbial or other origin containing functional units of heredity.
"Genetic resources" means genetic material of actual or potential value.
"Habitat" means the place or type of site where an organism or population naturally occurs.
"In-situ conditions" means conditions where genetic resources exist within ecosystems and natural habitats, and. in the case of domesticated or cultivated species, in the surroundings where they have developed their distinctive properties.
"In-situ conservation" means the conservation of ecosystems and natural habitats and the maintenance and recovery of viable populations of species in their natural surroundings and, in the case of domesticated or cultivated species, in the surroundings where they have developed their distinctive properties.
"Protected area" means a geographically defined area which is designated or regulated and managed to achieve specific conservation objectives.
"Regional economic integration organization" means an organization constituted by sovereign States of a given region, to which its member States have transferred competence in respect of matters governed by this Convention and which has been duly authorized, in accordance with its internal procedures, to sign, ratify, accept, approve or accede to it.
"Sustainable use" means the use of components of biological diversity in a way and at a rate that does not lead to the long-term decline of biological diversity, thereby maintaining its potential to meet the needs and aspirations of present and future generations.
"Technology" includes biotechnology.


Article 3. Principle


 States have, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the principles of international law, the sovereign right to exploit their own resources pursuant to their own environmental policies, and the responsibility to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other States or of areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction.


Article 4. Jurisdictional Scope


 Subject to the rights of other States, and except as otherwise expressly provided in this Convention, the provisions of this Convention apply, in relation to each Contracting Party:
 (a) In the case of components of biological diversity, in areas within the limits of its national jurisdiction; and
 (b) In the case of processes and activities, regardless of where their effects occur, carried out under its jurisdiction or control, within the area of its national jurisdiction or beyond the limits of national jurisdiction.


Article 5. Cooperation


 Each Contracting Party shall, as far as possible and as appropriate, cooperate with other Contracting Parties, directly or. where appropriate, through competent international organizations, in respect of areas beyond national jurisdiction and on other matters of mutual interest, for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity.


Article 6. General Measures for Conservation and Sustainable Use


 Each Contracting Party shall, in accordance with its particular conditions and capabilities:
 (a) Develop national strategies, plans or programmes for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity or adapt for this purpose existing strategies, plans or programmes which shall reflect, inter alia, the measures set out in this Convention relevant to the Contracting Party concerned; and
 (b) Integrate, as far as possible and as appropriate, the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity into relevant sectoral or cross-sectoral plans, programmes and policies.


Article 7. Identification and Monitoring


 Each Contracting Party shall, as far as possible and as appropriate, in particular for the purposes of Articles 8 to 10:
 (a) Identify components of biological diversity important for its conservation and sustainable use having regard to the indicative list of categories set down in Annex I:
 (b) Monitor, through sampling and other techniques, the components of biological diversity identified pursuant to subparagraph (a) above, paying particular attention to those requiring urgent conservation measures and those which offer the greatest potential for sustainable use;
 (c) Identify processes and categories of activities which have or are likely to have significant adverse impacts on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, and monitor their effects through sampling and other techniques; and
 (d) Maintain and organize, by any mechanism data, derived from identification and monitoring activities pursuant to subparagraphs (a), (b) and (c) above.


Article 8. In-situ Conservation


 Each Contracting Party shall, as far as possible and as appropriate:
 (a) Establish a system of protected areas or areas where special measures need to be taken to conserve biological diversity:
 (b) Develop, where necessary, guidelines for the selection, establishment and management of protected areas or areas where special measures need to be taken to conserve biological diversity:
 (c) Regulate or manage biological resources important for the conservation of biological diversity whether within or outside protected areas, with a view to ensuring their conservation and sustainable use; Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/8 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/9 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/10 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/11 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/12 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/13 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/14 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/15 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/16 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/17 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/18 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/19 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/20 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/21 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/22 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/23 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/24 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/25 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/26 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/27 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/28 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/29 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/30 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/31 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/32 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/33 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/34 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/35 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/36 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/37 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/38 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/39 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/40 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/41 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/42 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/43 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/44 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/45 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/46 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/47 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/48 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/49 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/50 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/51 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/52 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/53 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/54 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/55 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/56 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/57 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/58 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/59 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/60 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/61 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/62 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/63 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/64 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/65 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/66 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/67 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/68 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/69 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/70 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/71 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/72 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/73 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/74 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/75 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/76 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/77 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/78 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/79 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/80 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/81 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/82 Page:Convention on Biological Diversity.djvu/83





notes[edit]

  1. :Came into force on 29 December 1993, i.e., the ninetieth day after the date of deposit with the Secretary-General of the United Nations of the thirtieth instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession, in accordance with article 36 (1):
    Participant Date of deposit

    of the instrument
    of ratification,
    accession (a)
    or acceptance (A)

    Antigua and Barbuda.................................................................................................... 9 March 1993
    Armenia .......................................................................................................................... 14 May 1993 A
    Australia......................................................................................................................... 18 June 1993
    Bahamas......................................................................................................................... 2 September 1993
    Belarus........................................................................................................................... 8 September 1993
    Burkina Faso.................................................................................................................. 2 September 1993
    Canada........................................................................................................................... 4 December 1992
    China.............................................................................................................................. 5 January 1993
    Cook Islands.................................................................................................................. 20 April 1993
    Ecuador.......................................................................................................................... 23 February 1993
    Fiji................................................................................................................................... 25 February 1993
    Guinea............................................................................................................................ 7 May 1993
    Japan............................................................................................................................... 28 May 1993 A
    Maldives......................................................................................................................... 9 November 1992
    Marshall Islands ............................................................................................................ 8 October 1992
    Mauritius........................................................................................................................ 4 September 1992
    Mexico............................................................................................................................ 11 March 1993
    Monaco.......................................................................................................................... 20 November 1992
    Mongolia........................................................................................................................ 30 September 1993
    New Zealand.................................................................................................................. 16 September 1993
    Norway.......................................................................................................................... 9 July 1993
    Papua New Guinea*...................................................................................................... 16 March 1993
    Peru................................................................................................................................. 7 June 1993
    Saint Kitts and Nevis.................................................................................................... 7 January 1993
    Saint Lucia..................................................................................................................... 28 July 1993 a
    Seychelles...................................................................................................................... 22 September 1992
    Tunisia............................................................................................................................ 15 July 1993
    Uganda........................................................................................................................... 8 September 1993
    Vanuatu.......................................................................................................................... 25 March 1993
    Zambia........................................................................................................................... 28 May 1993
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