United Nations Security Council Resolution 20

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 20
by the United Nations

Adopted unanimously by the Security Council at its 117th meeting, on 10 March 1947

The Security Council,

Having received and considered the first report of the Atomic Energy Commission, [1] dated 31 December 1946 together with the letter of transmittal [2] of the same date,

1. Recognizes that any agreement expressed by the members of the Council to the separate portions of the report is preliminary, since final acceptance of any part by any nation is conditioned upon its acceptance of all parts of the control plan in its final form;

2. Transmits the record of its consideration of the first report of the Atomic Energy Commission to the Commission;

3. Urges the Atomic Energy Commission, in accordance with General Assembly resolutions 1 (I) of 24 January 1946 and 41 (I) of 14 December 1946, to continue its inquiry into all phases of the problem of the international control of atomic energy and to develop as promptly as possible the specific proposals called for by section 5 General Assembly resolution 1 (I) and by General Assembly resolution 41 (I), and in due course to prepare and submit to the Security Council a draft treaty or treaties or convention or conventions incorporating its ultimate proposals;

4. Requests the Atomic Energy Commission to submit a second report to the Security Council before the next session of the General Assembly.


[1] Official Records of the Atomic Energy Commission, First Year, Special Supplement.

[2] Official Records of the Security Council, Second Year, Supplement No. 5, annex 14.

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