United Nations Security Council Resolution 87

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 87
by the United Nations

Adopted by the Security Council at its 506th meeting, by 7 votes to 3 (China, Cuba, United States of America), with one abstention (Egypt), on 29 September 1950

The Security Council,

Considering that it is its duty to investigate any situation likely to lead to international friction or to give rise to a dispute, in order to determine whether the continuance of such dispute or situation may endanger international peace and security, and likewise to determine the existence of any threat to peace.

Considering that, in the event of a complaint regarding situations or facts similar to those mentioned above, the Council may hear the complainants,

Considering that, in view of the divergency of opinion in the Council regarding the representation of China and without prejudice to this question, it may, in accordance with rule 39 of the provisional rules of procedure, invite representatives of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China to provide it with information or assist it in the consideration of these matters,

Having noted the declaration of the People's Republic of China regarding the armed invasion of the island of Taiwan (Formosa),

Decides:

(a) To defer consideration of this question until the first meeting of the Council held after 15 November 1950;

(b) To invite a representative of the said Government to attend the meetings of the Council held after 15 November 1950 during the discussion of that government's declaration regarding an armed invasion of the island of Taiwan (Formosa).

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