United States v. General Electric Company

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United States v. General Electric Company by William Howard Taft
Syllabus
United States v. General Electric Co. is a 1926 decision of the United States Supreme Court holding (per Chief Justice Taft) that a patentee who has granted a single license to a competitor to manufacture the patented product may lawfully fix the price at which the licensee may sell the product. — Excerpted from United States v. General Electric Co. on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Court Documents
Opinion of the Court

United States Supreme Court

272 U.S. 476

UNITED STATES  v.  GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY

 Argued: Oct. 13, 1926. --- Decided: Nov 23, 1926

The Attorney General and Mr. James A. Fowler, of Knoxville, Tenn., for the United States.

[Argument of Counsel from page 477 intentionally omitted]

Mr. Charles Neave, of New York City, for General Electric Co.

Mr. Fred H. Wood, of New York City, for Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.

Mr. Chief Justice TAFT delivered the opinion of the Court.

Notes[edit]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).