Village of Euclid v. Ambler Realty Company

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Village of Euclid v. Ambler Realty Company
by George Sutherland
Syllabus
Village of Euclid, Ohio v. Ambler Realty Co., 272 U.S. 365 (1926), more commonly Euclid v. Ambler, was a United States Supreme Court case argued in 1926. It was the first significant and landmark case regarding the relatively new practice of zoning, and served to substantially bolster zoning ordinances in towns nationwide in the United States and in other countries of the world including Canada. — Excerpted from Village of Euclid v. Ambler Realty Co. on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Court Documents
Opinion of the Court

United States Supreme Court

272 U.S. 365

VILLAGE OF EUCLID  v.  AMBLER REALTY COMPANY

 Argued: Oct. 12, 1926. --- Decided: Nov 22, 1926

[Syllabus from pages 365-367 intentionally omitted]

Mr. James Metzenbaum, of Cleveland, Ohio, for appellants.

[Argument of Counsel from pages 367-371 intentionally omitted]

Messrs. Newton D. Baker and Robert M. Morgan, both of Cleveland, Ohio, for appellee.

[Argument of Counsel from pages 371-379 intentionally omitted]

Mr. Justice SUTHERLAND delivered the opinion of the Court.

Notes[edit]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).