Winter the Nursery for Spring Flowers

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Fugitive verse by Florence Earle Coates
Winter the Nursery for Spring Flowers
As rendered in Meehan's Monthly (Jan 1896):

WINTER THE NURSERY FOR SPRING
FLOWERS.

Death wished to borrow something of thy grace;
 And now that thou art lying 'neath the snow,
The grave that holds thee seems a favored place,
 Where one might willing go.
But life is not so rich in things divine,
That it would part with such a soul as thine!


A voice of comfort breathes from sorrowing Earth;
 If winter is the nursery of flowers,
If purity and loveliness have worth
 Beyond this world of ours,
If there is pity for the tears we shed,
If any truly live—thou art not dead!

—Florence Earle Coates.
 In Memorium on the death of Helen Bell.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. Miss Helen Bell was president of the Browning Society of Philadelphia when she died on 11 February 1895. Florence Earle Coates would follow Miss Bell as Society president, and would hold that position successively until 1903.


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1927, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.