Zoological Illustrations/VolIII-Pl128

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Zoological Illustrations
by William Swainson
Vol III. Pl. 128. Conus Maldivus var. Spanish Admiral Cone Chesnut variety.
Zoological Illustrations Volume III Plate 128.jpg

CONUS Maldivus, var.

Spanish Admiral Cone,

Chesnut variety.

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Generic Character.—See Pl. 65.


Specific Character.—See Pl. 127.

Conus Maldivus. Var. B. testâ castaneâ, fasciâ albescente mediâ angustâ ornatâ; anfractûs basalis basi et margine albis.
Var. B. Chesnut, with a narrow whitish band in the middle; base and margin of the body whorl white.
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As a further illustration of the last plate, I have been induced to figure this very rare variety, from a specimen I met with at Mrs. Mawe's. In the disposition of its markings, it approaches near to the shell represented in the Ency. Méth. plate 325, f. 6, but the white band in the middle is narrower, and quite destitute of the circular dotted lines there expressed.

No shells require a greater accuracy of delineation than the Cones, particularly in expressing the peculiarity in the form and sculpture of their spires. I am well persuaded that a great number of the mistakes committed by authors have originated in the wretched figures contained in Favanne's work, and in the early volumes of Martini. Those of Favanne are generally so loose and inaccurate, (although remarkably well engraved,) that I do not wish, by quoting, to make them any authority; and most of the Cones figured by Martini are equally bad.

Bruguiere and Lamarck have both given the character of spirâ canaliculatâ to this species, which is altogether a mistake. The spiral whorls are all but perfectly flat, and the suture is quite closed up, although sometimes uneven; originating, as in many other shells, either from the inequalities of growth, or from an accidental sea-break, which the animal may have repaired.