Banquet to the Honorable Carl Schurz/Letters and Telegrams received

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Banquet to the Honorable Carl Schurz
Committee of Arrangements
Letters and Telegrams received

LETTERS AND TELEGRAMS RECEIVED.


Among the many letters and telegrams received from the friends of Mr. Schurz who were prevented from attending the Banquet, were the following:


FROM EX-PRESIDENT CLEVELAND.


Westland, Princeton, N. J.,

February 18, 1899.

Gustav H. Schwab, Esq.

My Dear Sir: I regret exceedingly that I cannot promise myself the pleasure of participating in the celebration of Mr. Schurz's seventieth birthday. I find that an engagement, which I had hoped might be postponed, will prevent my attendance.

My disappointment is measured by the extreme gratification it would afford me to contribute my testimony to the volume that will be presented on the occasion you have arranged, in grateful support of Mr. Schurz's usefulness and patriotic citizenship.

His life and career teach lessons that cannot be too often or too impressively emphasized. They illustrate the moral grandeur of disinterested public service, and the nobility of a fearless advocacy of the things that are right and just and safe. It will be a sad day for our country when, in the light of such an example, our people refuse to see the best statesmanship in steadfast adherence to conscience and honesty in storm as well as sunshine.

I believe that the most confident hope of the permanency and continued beneficence of our free institutions rests upon the cultivation by those entrusted with public duty, and among the ranks of our countrymen, of the traits which have distinguished the man whom you propose to honor.

Yours very truly,

(Signed,) Grover Cleveland.


FROM HERR VON HOLLENBEN, AMBASSADOR EXTRAORDINARY
AND PLENIPOTENTIARY OF GERMANY
TO THE UNITED STATES.

Mr. Gustav H. Schwab, New-York City:

To my infinite regret, I am prevented from accepting your kind invitation to the dinner to be given in honor of the Hon. Carl Schurz. May I ask you to express my regret to the gentlemen of the Committee, and to forward to Mr. Schurz my warmest congratulations on his seventieth birthday. His long life has been blessed in its usefulness to the United States and to the German cause therein, and his name will be repeated to-day with praise and thankfulness, both in his old and in his adopted fatherland.

(Signed,) Von Hollenben,

Imperial German Ambassador,

Washington, D. C.


FROM THE HONORABLE J. STERLING MORTON.

San Francisco, Cal., February 23,1899,

Gustav H. Schwab,
Charles Stewart Smith,
William Bayard Cutting,
Charles C. Beaman,
Hubert Cillis,
William Jay Schieffelin,
A. Von Briesen,
George Wilson
,

\scriptstyle{

\left.

\begin{matrix}
\ \\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \ 
\end{matrix}

\right\}\, }

Committee
of
Arrangements.

Gentlemen: Your communication of February 6th, informing me of the proposed celebration of the seventieth birthday of Hon. Carl Schurz on the second of next month, by a banquet to be given by some of his admirers and friends, has just reached me here in San Francisco, and I hasten to express to you my sincere regret that I cannot be present in compliance with your kind invitation.

No American in our day or generation has more thoroughly comprehended the duties of citizenship in this republic. In every relation of life, Mr. Schurz has, by example, as well as precept, taught that duties as well as privileges rest upon every citizen.

Unlike many adopted citizens of the United States, Mr. Schurz always realizes that duties to the Republic are co-equal with the privileges which the Republic bestows.

In honoring Mr. Schurz, and in congratulating him upon his arrival in splendid health at the seventieth year of his useful life, we tell the youth of this country and the generations which are to follow us, that character, ability, and conscience, exercised irk behalf of the public welfare, give to posterity far greater good, far more inspiration for exaltation and advancement, than can the transmission of great fortunes.

During the last forty years there has appeared in the public life of this Republic no stronger individuality, no purer patriot, than Carl Schurz.

Congratulating you upon having honored this great and good patriot, and wishing for him as many years of usefulness and enjoyment in this world as he himself may crave, I remain, with great respect,

Your most obedient Servant,

(Signed,) J. Sterling Morton.


FROM THE HONORABLE WILLIAM ENDICOTT.

Boston, February 8, 1899.

George Wilson, Esq., Secretary,

32 Nassau Street, New-York.

Dear Sir: It would give me much pleasure to do anything to show the very great appreciation which I have of the character and public service of Mr. Schurz, but I am just recovering from an illness which has confined me to the house for a month, and I think it the part of prudence not to take any journey at present. With thanks for your kind invitation, I remain,

Yours very truly,

(Signed,) Wm. Endicott.


FROM THE HONORABLE GEORGE F. EDMUNDS.

Aiken, S. C., February 3, 1899.

Dear Sir: I should be quite glad to unite with you and the other gentlemen in celebrating the birthday of my long time friend and Senatorial associate, Mr. Schurz, but I am spending the winter here with my family, and shall be unable to take any part in the most deserved manifestation of esteem for him.

In haste, I am,

Very truly yours,

(Signed,) Geo. F. Edmunds.

The Hon. Abram S. Hewitt and others,

Committee, New-York, N. Y.


FROM THE HONORABLE EDWARD J. PHELPS.

New-Haven, Conn, February 18, 1899.

My Dear Sir: I am sorry that it will not be in my power to attend in New-York on the birthday of Mr. Schurz. I may be allowed, however, to express my sense of the eminent propriety of such a celebration, in recognition of the high character and distinguished public services of Mr. Schurz in a career which I trust is still far from its close. And I regret very much that I cannot join his fellow citizens in New-York in carrying it into effect.

Hoping that the occasion will be attended with every success, I am, dear sir,

Very sincerely yours,

(Signed,) E. J. Phelps.

Mr. George McAneny.


FROM PRESIDENT WILLIAM L. WILSON, OF WASHINGTON
AND LEE UNIVERSITY.

Washington and Lee University,

Lexington, Virginia, February 14, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, Secretary,

32 Nassau Street, New-York City.

Dear Sir: I have received the circular of the Committee of Arrangements for the complimentary dinner to Mr. Schurz on March 2d. I regret that the uncertain state of my health makes it imprudent for me to promise to attend. No one would more heartily than myself join in the testimonial, if circumstances permitted.

Yours truly,

(Signed,) Wm. L. Wilson.


TELEGRAM FROM HIS EXCELLENCY LON V. STEPHENS,
GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI.

Jefferson City, Mo., March 2, 1899.

Hon. Carl Schurz:

I desire to unite with our general assembly in congratulating you upon reaching your seventieth birthday. Your fearless and intelligent advocacy of what you thought right and just at all times, whether popular or not, has won for you the honest admiration of millions of your countrymen. You have not lived in vain.

Lon V. Stephens,

Governor of Missouri.


FROM PRESIDENT DANIEL C. GILMAN, OF JOHNS HOPKINS
UNIVERSITY, BALTIMORE.

Johns Hopkins University,

Baltimore, February 28,1899.

George Wilson, Esq., Secretary.

Dear Sir: I regret to be obliged to say that it now appears as if I shall be prevented from attending the banquet on Thursday, and it will certainly be impossible for me to attend the meeting of the Committee on Wednesday.

I greatly honor the recipient of this testimonial, and I would not willingly be wanting in any token of my admiration and regard.

Yours truly,

(Signed,) Daniel C. Gilman.


FROM THE REV. ANDREW V. V. RAYMOND, D. D.,
PRESIDENT OF UNION COLLEGE, SCHENECTADY, N. Y.

Union College, Schenectady, N. Y.,

February 10, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, New-York City.

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your very kind invitation to join in the dinner to be given upon the seventieth birthday of the Hon. Carl Schurz, in recognition of his personal qualities and great public services. I wish to assure you of my hearty sympathy with the object of this gathering, and my sincere regret that a trip to the south will make it impossible for me to be present on the evening of March 2d.

Yours very truly,

(Signed,) Andrew V. V. Raymond.


FROM PROFESSOR J. LAURENCE LAUGHLIN, OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO.

The University of Chicago,

Hyde Park, February 11, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, Secretary, New-York.

Dear Sir: It is a cause of deep regret that my distance from New-York and my engagements will prevent my joining with other friends of Mr. Schurz in the fitting celebration of his seventieth birthday.

Apart from my personal affection for him, it is no exaggeration to say that, no other public man of the day has, through all his career, furnished to the youth of this country a higher exhibition of lofty patriotism, political courage, honest adherence to his convictions under criticism and abuse, sterling character, and commanding statesmanship. His closing years of life are sweetened by the admiration and regard of all men who know him, and who wish well to the American commonwealth.

Very truly yours,

(Signed,) J. Laurence Laughlin.


FROM PRESIDENT JAMES B. ANGELL OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN.

University of Michigan,

Ann Arbor, February 8, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, Secretary,

32 Nassau Street, New-York City.

Dear Sir: I have received your notice of the dinner to be given to Mr. Schurz. I regret to say that my engagements here will make it impossible for me to attend, but I am sure that so many Will be glad of the opportunity to do honor to the scholar and statesman, that I shall not be missed. I take pleasure in expressing my high appreciation of the great services he has rendered to our country by his writings and his speeches.

Yours truly,

(Signed,) James B. Angell.


TELEGRAM FROM PRESIDENT BOOKER T. WASHINGTON
OF THE TUSKEGEE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL
INSTITUTE.

Tuskegee, Ala., March 2, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, 32 Nassau Street, N. Y.

Regret my inabillity to be present this evening at the testimonial reception to be tendered Carl Schurz, scholar, patriot, humanitarian. His devotion to the civil service cause, and of humanity oppressed, have won the admiration of all men without regard to race or condition. Please express my congratulations.

Booker T. Washington.


FROM MR. ANDREW CARNEGIE.

Dungeness, Fernandina, Fla.,

February 27, 1899.

Dear Sir: That I am to miss the seventieth birthday dinner given in honor of my friend, Carl Schurz, is to me a source of unusual regret, for there is no man I wish more deeply to see thus appreciated, nor one more deserving of the genuine regard of his fellows and the admiration of all his friends, who know the man and love him.

A stainless, useful life is his record so far, which, we who know him, know full well, is to remain stainless to the end.

Added years to Carl Schurz can only bring added honors. He and disgrace are strangers.

Long life to him for his country's sake, and for all of your sakes, his friends.

Very truly yours,

(Signed,) Andrew Carnegie.

George Wilson, Esq., Secretary Carl Schurz Dinner.


FROM MR. CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER.

Hartford, February 10, 1899.

George Wilson, Esq., Secretary.

Dear Sir: Nothing could give me more pleasure than to join in the recognition of the distinguished public service and the great intellectual ability and moral courage of Carl Schurz at the dinner on the second of March.

But according to my present arrangements I shall not be in this region on that date.

If I fortunately am, I shall inform you in time, so that a seat may be given me at the table.

Yours sincerely,

(Signed,) Chas. Dudley Warner.


FROM MR. NOAH BROOKS.

Santa Monica, Cal., February 26,1899.

Mr. George Wilson, Secretary.

Dear Sir: As a warm friend and admirer of Mr. Schurz I would take great pleasure in uniting in the testimonial in his honor March 2d, but I am here for the cold season, and cannot attend the dinner. There is no real need of my writing to say this, but I hold Mr. Schurz in such high esteem that, rather than seem to be indifferent to the privilege extended to me, I write to say that I am very sorry I cannot pay a more substantial tribute of honor and respect.

Yours truly,

(Signed,) Noah Brooks.


FROM CAPTAIN F. E. CHADWICK, U. S. NAVY.

U. S. S. New-York, February 10, 1899.

Dear Sir: I much regret that absence from the country will preclude my taking part in the dinner to be given in honor of the Honorable Carl Schurz, and in celebrating his seventieth birthday, March 2d.

Yours very truly,

(Signed,) F. E. Chadwick.

To George Wilson, Esq.,

Secretary.


FROM MR. FRANCIS R. COPE.

Philadelphia, March 2, 1899.

George Wilson, Secretary.

Dear Friend: I am in receipt of your circular inviting me to participate in tendering a complimentary dinner to the Hon. Carl Schurz on his seventieth birthday.

I thank the Committee for the invitation, and unite with them in admiration of the character and great public services of Mr. Schurz, but a recent family bereavement precludes my taking part in any public social entertainment. With great respect, I am,

Thine truly,

(Signed,) Francis R. Cope.


FROM THE HONORABLE WILLIAM D. BYNUM.

Indianapolis, Ind., February 7, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson,

New-York.

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of the invitation of the Committee of Arrangements to take part in a dinner to be given as a compliment to the Hon. Carl Schurz on the occasion of the celebration of his seventieth birthday. I presume the Committee was under the impression that I was still a resident of the City of New-York, but such is not the case. Were it possible, however, for me to join the friends of Mr. Schurz in this mark of appreciation of his great public services, I would cheerfully do so.

Thanking you for distinction conferred by your invitation,

I remain yours sincerely,

(Signed,) W. D. Bynum..


TELEGRAM FROM THE HONORABLE H. H. KOHLSAAT.

Chicago, March 2, 1899.

George Wilson, Esq.,

32 Nassau Street, New-York.

Regret exceedingly my inability to be present at Mr. Schurz's anniversary to-night. Please convey to him my hearty congratulations.

H. H. Kohlsaat.


FROM PROFESSOR GEORGE P. FISHER, OF YALE UNIVERSITY.

Yale University, New-Haven, Conn.,

February 16, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson.

My Dear Sir: It is with great regret that I find myself not able to accept the invitation to join the friends of Mr. Schurz at the complimentary dinner on March 2d. His personal traits and his great services to the country as a citizen and in official stations render him deserving of the highest honor and regard.

Sincerely yours,

(Signed,) George P. Fisher.


FROM THE HONORABLE ST. CLAIR MC KELWAY.

Brooklyn, N. Y., February 16,1899.

Dear Sir: My engagements do not permit me to attend the dinner which some of Mr. Schurz's many other friends will give to him in his honor on March 2d. I regret the inability to be with them very much.

I trust and doubt not the occasion will be memorable for the heartiness of its tribute. It will certainly be memorable for the character and career to which it will attest. There is no man with whom I agree or from whom I differ, and there are many respects in which I do both as to Mr. Schurz, for whom I have more respect and for whom I wish more happiness and the evidence of more esteem and regard,

Very sincerely,

(Signed,) {{small-caps|St. Clair McKelway.

George Wilson, Esq.


FROM MR. HEINRICH CONRIED.

New-York, March 2,1899.

To the Chairman,

Presiding at the Hon. Carl Schurz Anniversary.

Dear Sir. Permit me on this festive occasion, as the humble representative of German dramatic art within our confines, to convey through you my felicitations to the celebrant whom you honor to-night. In the countless expressions of admiration and appreciation that will doubtless be showered upon the guest of honor, I beg you will believe none will be more sincere than this, and from the very fact that in the distinguished celebrant all those associated with the furtherance of German art and science have found not only a noble patron but a helpful companion.

The broad genius, the liberal spirit, the true courage with which the activity of year guest has ever been fraught, cannot but serve as an example to all our fellow-citizens of whatever extraction, and German-Americans throughout the land may well point with pride to their foremost compatriot, who has contributed so much towards gaining for them the esteem and recognition of the entire nation.

As a part and parcel, then, of German-Americanism, the German theatre is but fulfilling a duty in adding to the words of universal praise and congratulation its own expression of gratitude, and of the hope that many years may yet be granted to the celebrant in which to exercise such functions as may fall to his lot, and which, whatever they may be, will prove beneficial to all concerned.

I am, dear sir, very respectfully yours,

(Signed,) Heinrich Conried,


TELEGRAM FROM THE PHILADELPHIA SCHURZ CELEBRATION COMMITTEE.

Philadelphia, Pa., March 2, 1899.

To the Schurz Banquet Committee,

Delmonico's, N. Y.

The participants of the Philadelphia Schurz celebration assembled at Lulu Temple, 1337 Spring Garden Street, send cordial greeting to their brethren of New-York, and trust that the joint commemoration of the seventieth birthday of the greatest of German Americans may strengthen that bond of solidarity which exists between all those who love their country more than themselves.

C. J. Hexamer, Chairman.


FROM THE HONORABLE WILLIAM R. GRACE.

31 East 79th Street,

New-York, March 2, 1899.

The Chairman of the Banquet,

To Hon. Carl Schurz.

My Dear Sir: It is with the greatest regret that I am compelled to absent myself to-night from the testimonial to my friend, Mr. Schurz. I know of no man in this community who has labored harder for the elevation of political standards than has the gentleman you honor, and I believe that the example he has set the younger men in politics will live for many years.

I have great pleasure in testifying to the wise counsels of Mr. Schurz, from whom I have drawn many good inspirations, and whom I hold in the highest possible esteem as one of the ablest of our prominent men in public life.

I feel that the country at large is, indeed, fortunate in having had so many years of his services, and though I am prevented from being present, I most heartily join in the good wishes to him on this his seventieth birthday.

Yours truly,

(Signed,) W. R. Grace.


FROM MR. ROBERT MATHEWS.

96 Spring St., Rochester, N. Y.,

February 14, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, Secretary.

Dear Sir: It would give me great pleasure to attend the dinner to be given March 2d in honor of Mr. Carl Schurz, but it will be impossible for me, to be in New-York at that time.

Outside of the personal satisfaction of meeting Mr. Schurz, and the many distinguished people who will be present on that occasion, we owe it as a duty to our country to recognize the principles for which he has so long stood. In a democracy the most potent influence in directing the course of public affairs will always be the political ideals which obtain among the majority of its citizens, and it is particularly opportune to honor those of which Mr. Schurz is the representative.

Coming to the land of his adoption to find the liberty which he could not secure in his fatherland, he has always stood for good government, seeking it each time the issue was presented, by those means which seemed to him on that occasion most likely to realize it. Hence he has always been an independent in politics, and has regarded parties as a means to an end and not the end itself. When our existence as a nation was threatened by the civil war, he gave his services to the country that the Union might be preserved. When our political system was being debauched by the spoils of office, he gave his time and his great ability to the cause of civil service reform. And now that the lust of power and conquest has for a time blinded the eyes of many to the dangers of expansion, and the changes that must occur in our political ideals, if this policy is adopted, no voice has been raised more strenuously in calling the attention of our people to those ideals which have heretofore prevailed, that ours is a nation founded upon the consent of the governed, upon justice and liberty, upon peace and prosperity. If we do not wish its influence for democracy and freedom to “perish from the earth,” must dedicate it anew to those principles which it has exemplified in the past.

Sincerely yours,

(Signed,) Robert Mathews.


FROM MR. A. S. WHEELER.

Boston, February 10, 1899.

George Wilson, Esq., Secretary.

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of invitation to attend the complimentary dinner to Hon. Carl Schurz. Entertaining, as I do, a very high opinion of the, public services of Mr. Schurz, it would give me great pleasure to take part in the dinner, but the state of my health is such that I am unable to do so.

Thanking the Committee for the invitation,

I am, very truly yours,

(Signed,) A. S. Wheeler.


FROM MR. JOHN W. ELA.

Chicago, February 23, 1899.

Messrs. Gustav H. Schwab and others,

Committee of Arrangements.

I regret exceedingly that I shall not be able to attend the dinner to the Hon. Carl Schurz on March 2d.

I believe that the stability of our institutions depends now more than ever upon the growth and permanency of the movement for independent political action in this country, of which movement Mr. Schurz is the unquestioned leader.

Permit me to propose a sentiment Carl Schurz, the moral and intellectual Bayard of American politics! “The chevalier without fear and without stain.” His record as a fearless soldier for the truth, as he sees it, without regard to personal interest or party affiliation, is unparalleled in the history of our time. May he live to see the time when the people shall have taken the place of the individual in the view of the average legislator, and when the term “Political Hospital” shall no longer be justly applicable to the public service anywhere in this country.

Yours very truly,

(Signed,) John W. Ela.


FROM MR. FRANCIS A. OSBORN.

Boston, February 27, 1899.

Messrs. Gustav H. Schwab and others,

Committee of Arrangements, &c.

Gentlemen: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your courteous invitation to take part in the dinner to be given to celebrate the seventieth birthday of the Hon. Carl Schurz on March 2d next.

I appreciate highly the honor of being offered an opportunity to participate in such an occasion, and I regret deeply that I find myself unable to be present. It would give me great pleasure to be one of the large gathering which will assemble to testify their respect for the honored guest, and to express their recognition of the noble service he has rendered to his adopted country. He has not only filled and adorned high offices in the nation, but he by his grand character, lofty aims and advanced views upon questions of public morality, gained the position of one of the foremost citizens of the republic. His influence is always leading as up to a higher plane, and, through the force of his genius, and of the weight of his character, is all powerful for good. A worthy companion and successor of the lamented George William Curtis, he ever holds the people up to a high ideal.

I rejoice to see that a recognition of his worth is to be given him by a body of men whose approval is a badge of nobility.

Very respectfully yours,

(Signed,) Francis A. Osborn.


FROM MR. GRANGE SARD.

Albany, New-York, February 11, 1899.

George Wilson, Secretary,

New-York, N. Y.

Dear Sir: I beg to acknowledge receipt of your circular of the 6th inst., informing me of the intention of some of the friends of Hon. Carl Schurz to entertain him at a complimentary dinner on March 2d, and inviting me to take part in the dinner.

I have a great admiration for Mr. Schurz. His character and ability have made him beloved, and a most useful member of society; and it would afford me great pleasure to unite with others of his friends in the entertainment referred to, but I am expecting to go south the latter part of February, to be absent all of March, and this will prevent my having the pleasure of uniting in this most suitable recognition of the services and high qualities for which Mr. Schurz is so notable.

Yours very truly,

(Signed,) George Said.


FROM MR. JAMES TAUSSIG.

St. Louis, Mo., February 28, 1899.

Messrs. Gustav R. Schwab and others,

Committee.

Dear Sirs: I had hoped, until to-day, to avail myself of the privilege, to celebrate with you the seventieth birthday of Carl Schurz.

But to my great regret, I must stay at home. To have paid this personal tribute to him, would have been a pleasure to one who has known and loved him so long and so well.

It has always seemed to me, that a man's lawyer has a better opportunity — granting capacity — to correctly read his character, than his physician, minister, or his associates in life.

Be this as it may, I have read the book to my own satisfaction; and the net result is the history of a gifted, truthful and honest man, striving to do well his allotted task in life, seeking to raise his fellowman to a higher and better level; and succeeding in the main.

It matters little whether or not we always agree with him as to the best means, or the, best road to reach the goal. Nor need we regret that, standing high and erect, he is a good target for the critic, honest or otherwise. Blessed is the public man who is unjustly and indiscriminately traduced in his lifetime. If he is called an impracticable stickler for principle by one and a Halifax the Trimmer by another, posterity will know, that they could not both be right and will conclude that both were wrong.

And to this we, who know him, do testify.

Very sincerely,

(Signed,) James Taussig.


LETTER FROM MR. JOHN RITCHIE.

10 Mount Vernon Street,

Boston, March 1, 1899.

Mr. George Wilson, Secretary.

Dear Sir: I regret very much that I cannot accept your kind invitation to be present at the dinner tomorrow night in honor of our great citizen and patriot, Carl Schurz.

It will be a great occasion, but not greater than the recipient merits. He is an example to us all, and a source of hope and courage too. I would that all such men might live to be seventy.

Very truly yours,

(Signed,) John Ritchie.