Diplomacy and the Study of International Relations/Index

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Diplomacy and the Study of International Relations by D. P. HEATLEY
Index


INDEX


Acton, Lord, on right and wrong in history and politics, 7, 76.

Adams, Charles Francis, 88.

Addison, 63.

Advocationis Hispanicae Libri Duo, Gentili's, 119.

Aix-la-Chapelle, Treaty of, 67.

Albany, the fourth Duke of, 73-4.

Albin, Les grands Traites politiques, 144.

Allgemeiner bistorischer Handatlas, Droysen's, 146.

Alliances, Frederick II of Prussia on the making of, 160 ; Clausewitz on, 161-2.

Ambassadors, Wotton's ' pleasant definition ' of, 7-8; early, i6sqq. ; ' eloquence ' of, 17, 21, 216, 220-1 ; Machiavelli on the office of, 77-8 ; as comedians, 217, 227; Vera, Wicquefort, Callieres, and Charles de Martens on the function and qualities of, 216 sqq. See Diplo- macy and Diplomatists.

Ambassadeur et ses Fonctions, L', 1 S3~S- See Wicquefort.

Ambassadeur, Le Parfait, 17, 152-3. See Vera. .

Amelot de la Houssaie, 77, 230.

Amphibologies, 32.

Anti-Ma chiavel writings, 76-7, 151.

Aquinas, 177.

' Arbitration ', 160.

Archives de fHistoire de France^ 89-90.

Archives diplomatiques, 144.

Astutia, 76.

Atlases, historical, 146.

Augustine, 5, 177.

Aurelius, Marcus, 177.

Austin, 92.


Baas, 45.

Bacon, 15, 24, 38, 140-1.

Balance of Power, the, 20, 27-8,

79-80, 93, 95, 96, 104, 108, 147,

191-4,203-4. Balfour, A. J., on the conduct of

foreign policy, 265-9. Bentham, 180, 181 ; on Perpetual

Peace, 195-200. Berkeley, Bishop, 21 1. Bernard, Mountague, Lectures on

Diplomacy, 28, 80, 164-5. Bibliotheque de I'Homme public, 154. Bismarck, 13, 15, 38, 41-2, 43, 50,

51,68-9,176. Black Book of the Admiralty, The,

126, 130, 136.

Blake, Instructions to, 133. Bolingbroke, 27. Borgia, Caesar, 76. Boroughs, Sir John, 128, 131-41. Breteuil, le baron de, 53. Britainandalliancesintheeighteenth

century, 57 sqq. Broglie, le comte de, 80. Brougham, Lord, 15. Bruhl, Count, 54.

Bryce, James (Lord), 277, 279, 280. Buchanan, Sir A., 252-3. Burke, 80, 97, 213. Byzantine diplomacy, 19.


Callieres, his book, 155-6; on the function of the negotiator, 219; on the qualities of the diplomatist, 223-8, 229-30 ; on the conduct of negotiations, 239-40, 246 ; on treaties, 249-50.

Cambridge Modern History, The, 89, 146, 171.


286


Index


Campanella, De Monarchic Hispa- nica, 76.

Canning, 1 1, 28, 35.

Canning, Sir Stratford ; see Red- cliffe.

Carteret, 34, 43, 62, 63, 64, 65.

Castro, Alphonso de, 118.

Catherine II of Russia, 53-5, 65.

Causes celebres du droit des gens, 113.

Cavour, 16.

Cecil, Robert, n.

Chalmers, Collection of Maritime Treaties, 145.

Charles I of England, 130, 131, 132.

Charles V, the Emperor, 38, 46.

China, communication from Presi- dent Tyler to, 40-1.

Churchill, John, 1 5.

Cipher, 235, 242 sqq.

Civilitas, 180.

Clarendon, History of the Rebellion, on Cromwell, 45.

Clarendon, the Earl of, Foreign Secretary, 12, 21-2, 254-6, 263.

Clausewitz, On War, 161-4; on allies as the support of the defensive, 161-2; on the in- fluence of the political object on the military, 162-3 5 on war as an instrument of policy, 163-4.

Clergy, the, as diplomatists, 224,

237-8-

Cobbett, Pitt, 113-14. Cobbett, William, 101. Collections oj Treaties, 143-5. Comedian, the Ambassador as, 217,

227. Commentaries upon International

Law, Phillimore's, 107-8. Comines, 218, 223. Commission des affaires exterieures

et coloniales, La, 270-3, 281. Commons, the House of, and the

conduct of foreign policy ; see

Parliament. Commonwealth, the British, 70-1,

75-6.

Concert of Europe, the, 28. Cond, the Prince of, 63.


Condorcet, 154.

Considerations sur le Gouvernement

de Pologne, 77. Conti, the Prince de, 80. Continuity in foreign policy, 52 sqq. Contraband, 95, 98-9, 112, 113. Control Social, Le, 77, 181, 182,

184-5.

Corps Universel Diplomatique, 143. Cowley, Lord, 10, 257-8. Craggs, James, 63, 64. Cromwell, Oliver, 44-5, 151, 170. Cromwell, Thomas, 46-7, 48. Cromwell, Life and Letters of Thomas,

47. IS*-

Cunning, 233-4.

Dallington, R., 25, 149-50.

Dante, 5, 96, 177-9.

De Abusu Mendacii, Gentili's, 152.

Debidour, 172.

De Dominio Maris, Welwod's,

127-8. Defensio Capitis Quinti Maris Liberi

Oppugnati a Gulielmo Welwodo,

Grotius's, 127. Deffaudis, Questions diplotnatiques,

86.

De Jure Belli, Gentili's, 119. De Jure Belli ac Pacis ; see Grotius. De Jure Praedae, Grotius's, 117. De la Maniere de negocier avec les

SowtfCT-ains, Callieres's, 155-6; and

see Callieres. De legationibus libri tres, Gentili's,

76, 151-2. Democracy and stability, 53 sqq.,

68-76, 278, 280, 281-2; and

empire, 150-1. De Monarcbia Hispanica, Campa-

nclla's, 76.

Derby, the fifteenth Earl of, 70. Despacci degli ambasciatori e resi-

denti veneti alf estero, 90. Digby, John, 1 54. Dinners and diplomacy, 10, 227. Diplomacy, and morality, 31 sqq. ;

kinds of, 39 ; illustrations of, 43 ;

'open', 73-5; 'secret', 253-9;


Index


287


the study of, 85 sqq. ; recent British, 168 sqq. See Ambassa- dors and Diplomatists.

Diplomatic Practice, A Guide to ; see Satow.

Diplomatic Revolution, the, 49.

Diplomatic service and one's coun- try, 9-10 ; good dinners and, 10 ; handwriting and, 10-11. See Diplomacy.

Diplomatic Service, Report on the ; see Report.

Diplomatists, qualities for, 14 sqq., 17, 21-2, 220-38; Machiavelli and, 22-6. See Ambassadors and

- Diplomacy.

Discourses on Livy, The, Machia- velli's, 23.

Dispatches, 49-50, 78, 90, 242, 244-8,251-9,263.

Disraeli, 43.

Distance and the conduct of diplo- macy, 29.

Dominion of the Sea ; see Sovereignty.

Dominions, the, and the control of foreign policy, 71, 75-6, 282-4.

Dominium Maris Britannici asser- tum, 131-2 ; see Boroughs.

Double Instrument, Un, 250.

Droit des Gens, Le, Vattel's, 96-100.

Droysen, Handatlas, 146.

Duff, Mountstuart Grant, on the interest of the public in inter- national affairs, 3-4 ; on diplo- matists and politics, 9.

Dumont, 143.

Dutch fishermen, 137-40.

Egerton, H. E., British Foreign

Policy in Europe to the End of the

igtb Century, 170-1. Elements of International Law,

Wheaton, 106-7. Elizabeth (of England), Queen, II-

12, 170, 218. Elizabeth of Russia, 53. Embassador and his Functions, The,

154-5 ; and see Wicquefort. Emile, Rousseau's, 183, 186-7.


Empire, democracy and, 150-1. ' Europe ', meaning of, 189-90. ' Extracts ' in published dispatches, 49-5-

Falsiloquy, 34.

Federalist, The, vi-vii, 100, 142,

204, 206, 279, 281-2. Firth, C. H., on Oliver Cromwell, 44. Flecamore, Christopher, 8. Foedera, Rymer's, 144. Foreign Affairs Committee of the

Federal Council in Germany,

275-6. Foreign Office, business of the, 86,

265-70.

' Foreign Office hand, The ', n. Foreign Office List, The, 167. Foreign policy, 48 sqq. ; the Crown

and the conduct of, in Britain,

173-4, and works on, 173-5 ;

parliament and, see Parliament. Foreign Relations Committee in the

United States of America, 281. Fortuna, 23, 25-6,48. Fox, Charles James, 80, 97-8. France, treatment of international

questions in, 270-2, 281. Francis I of France, 46. Frederick Barbarossa, 177. Frederick II of Prussia, 42-3, 44, 52,

53,54, 57 ^q., 65, 81-2,160-1. Freedom, 74. Freeman, E. A., on politics and

political morality, I -2. French language, the, in diplomatic

intercourse, 10, 11-12. French Revolution, the, 105, no,

119. Fulton, The Sovereignty of the Sea,

118, 119, 127, 128, 131, 132, 137.

Gaguin, 15.

Garden, Le Comte de, 143.

Gardiner, S. R., on Cromwell, 45 ;

on the sovereignty of the sea,

116-17, "8, 129- Gentili, Alberico, 76, 96, 119, i5l-2

212.


288


Gentz, F. von, 80.

George I, 61, 62.

George II, 61, 62.

German language, the, in diplomatic intercourse, 12-13.

Germany, treatment of international questions in, 272-7.

Gierke, Professor, 178-9.

Girolami, Raphael, 77.

Gladstone, 70, 260-2.

4 Good offices ', 160.

Gortschakoff, 28, 50.

Graswinckel, 130.

Green, T. H., 208-9.

Grey, the first Earl, 31.

Grotius, on resident ambassadors, 18-19; on amphibologies, 32 ; his Mare Liberum, 116 sqq. ; also, 93, 96, 107-8, 109, no, 112, 114, 115, 127 sqq., 150, 152, 209, 210, 212.

Grotius Society, publications of the, 210.

Guicciardini, 23, 25-6, 149-50.

Guide diplomatique, Le, 85-6, 87, 156-7.

Halifax, Sir George Savile, Marquis

of, 38, 61.

Hall, W. E., 107, 112-13, 116. Hamilton, Alexander, vi, vii, 279,

281-2. Hammond, Adventures of a Paper in

the Foreign Office, 166. Handwriting, 10, n. Harangues, Indice des plus belles,

I 53- Harris, Sir James, the first Earl of

Malmesbury, 29-30, 36-7, 54, 55, 164 ; on advice to a young man ' destined for the foreign line ', 234-6. Harrison, Frederic, Oliver Cromwell,

44-

Hauterive, 80. Heeren, A. H. L., 13, 57 sqq., 96-7,

165.

Hegel, 77. Heligoland, cession of, 70, 260-3,

264.


Henrietta, Duchess of Orleans,

239-

Henry IV, king of France, 79, 96.

Henry VII, 45-6.

Henry VIII, 46.

Hertslet, Edward, Map of Europe by Treaty, 146-8.

Hertslet, Lewis, Collection oj Treaties and Conventions between Great Britain and Foreign Powers, 145.

Hildebrand, 177.

Histoire abregee des Traites, 143.

Histoire de mon Temps, Frederick IPs, 42, 160-1.

Histoire generate, Lavisse et Ram- baud, 89.

Historical Atlas of Modern Europe, 146.

History, importance of the study of, 13-14, 85-6, 223.

History of the Law of Nations, Wheaton's, 20, 91-5, 99-100, 112, 153-4. See Walker.

Holdernesse, correspondence be- tween Andrew Mitchell and, 53-4, 65, 81-2.

Holland, T. E., 165-6, in.

Hooker, Richard, on law and the law of nations, 212-15.

Imperial War Cabinet, the, 283-4. Imperial War Conference, the, 282. Imperium, the, in the Middle Age,

177.

Instructions, 236, 240, 242 sqq. Instructions donnees aux Ambassa-

deurs de France, 14, 18, 19, 27, 29,

34, 49? 53, 54, 55, &* International law, development of,

91 sqq., 112-13, 114-15 ; Treatises

of, 96 sqq. International morality, 177 sqq.,

208 sqq. International policy and its study,

48 sqq., 85 sqq. Interpellations respecting foreign

policy, 272, 274. Irony in diplomacy, 41-2.


Index


289


James I of England, 8, 128, 130. Jenkinson, C., Collection oj Treaties,

144.

Jew of Malta, The, 24-5. Jugement sur la Paix perpetuelle,

Rousseau's, 183, 185-6. Junta, the Spanish, 52, 259-60. Justice, Alexander, A General

Treatise oj the Dominion and

Laws oj the Sea, 124, 126.

Kant on Perpetual Peace and the Society of Nations, 180, 181, 200-7.

Kaunitz, 65.

Keith, Sir R., 14.

Koch et Scholl, 143.

Latin language, the, in diplomatic intercourse, 11-12.

Law and Custom oj the Sea, 1 18, 120.

Law of Nations, The, Twiss's, 108-12.

Leading Cases and Opinions in International Law, 113-14.

League of Nations, A, viii, 75, 114-15, 194, 207; and see Per- petual Peace and Society of Peoples.

Learning as a qualification of the diplomatist, 221-2, 225-6.

Leibnitz, 103, 143, 144.

Letters oj Queen Victoria, The, 173.

Lieger, 7-8.

Lies, 31 sqq., 152, 230 sqq., 236.

Lipsius, Justus, 149-50.

Loftus, Lord Augustus, 21, 22, 28,

32, 176- Louis XI, 31. Louis XV, secret correspondence of,

29>3542, 80-1. Louise of Savoy, 239. Lowe, Robert, 3. Lyons, Lord, 21, 69.

Mably, 1'Abbe de, 142.

Machiavelli, 4, 19, 22, 46, 48, 76-7, 77-8, 149, 150, 151, 223, 230.

Machiavellianism and anti-Machia- vellianism, 76-7, 230 sqq.


Machiavellism, 226.

Mackintosh, Sir James, 28, loo.

Madison, 142-3, 279.

Maine, Sir Henry, 11415.

Maitland, F. W., 125.

Malmesbury, the first Earl of; see Harris.

Malmesbury, the third Earl of, 10, n, 13, 29, 30,35, 39,68, 173,176, 234-6.

Manzoni, 16.

Map oj Europe by Treaty, The, Hertslet's, 146-8.

Maps, 146-8.

Mare Clausum, Selden's, 128, 129-31.

Mare Liberum, Grotius's, 117 sqq., 129, 131, 133.

Martens, Charles de, on the study of diplomacy, 85-6, 87; his Causes celebres, 113; continues the Re- cueil des principaux traites, 144 ; his Guide diplomatique, 1 56-7 ; on the function of the diplomatist, 220-1 ; on the conduct of nego- tiations, 240-2 ; on diplomatic correspondence, 247-9.

Martens, G. F. von, Precis du Droit des Gens, 96, 100-5 ; Recueil des principaux traites, 143-4.

Mazarin, 43, 45, ,153, 233.

Means and end in politics, 4-7.

' Mediation ', 160.

Memoires, 248, 249.

Memorandum, 248.

Menterie officieuse, La, 230-1.

Metternich, 31-2.

Middle age in negotiators, 225.

Middle Age, the ideal of the, 177-9.

Milton, 63.

Mitchell, letters from and to Sir A., 53-4, 60, 65, 8 1 -2.

Mommsen, 51.

Monarchy and stability, 55-6.

Montaigne, 24, 230.

Montesquieu, 22, 58.

Morley, Oliver Cromwell, and Re- collections, 44.


290


Index


Napoleon, 31, 60, 102, 105, 106, no, 194.

Napoleon III, 68.

Negotiating, the art of, 21, 219, 223-30, 239-42.

' Notes ', 88, 248.

Nys, Les Origines du droit inter- national, 95-6,118 ; 129,179,180.

' Occupation ' of the sea, 122-5. ' Officious ' conversation, 39. Old age in negotiators, 225. Oleron, Rolls of, 125, 136. ' Open ' diplomacy, 73-5, 253-9,

263-9. Oppenheim, L., International Law,

19, 112, 116, 157. Orator, \6sqq. ; * bon Ambassadeur,

bon Orateur', 17, 220-1. Order in Council of 1795, 98-9.

Paix perpetuelle, La, 96, 178 sqq.,

206 sqq. Palmerston, ir, 32, 35-6, 39, 173,

263.

Panin, 54. Parliament and the conduct of

foreign policy in Britain, 55 sqq.,

68 sqq., 83-4, 224, 253-9, 260-9. Parliaments in France, Germany,

and the United States of America,

treatment of international ques- tions by, 270-82. Parties in Britain and foreign

policy, 63 sqq., 68 sqq., 83-4. Pelhdm, Thomas and Henry, 62,

64 ; Henry, 67-8. Pepys, 1 1 6. ' Periods of European History ',

89. Perpetual Peace, Projects of, 178

sqq., 206 sqq.

Perpetual Peace, Kant's, 200 sqq. Persona, 125. Peter III of Russia, 53. Phillimore, Sir Robert, 107-8. Phillimore, W. G. F., Three Centuries

of Treaties oj Peace and their

Teaching, 172.


Pitt, the elder, 43, 60, 62, 65.

Pitt, the younger, 6, 80.

Plan for an Universal and Perpetual

Peace, Bentham's, 195 sqq. Poland, partitioning of, 81, 194. Pole, Cardinal, 46, 47. Policy, 4 sqq. ; foreign, 48 sqq., 150 ;

and the conduct of war, 162, 164,

See Foreign, International, Parlia- ment. Polish Succession (or Election) War,

the, 66. Political morality, i -2, 5-7, 22-7, 31

sqq. Polttique de tous les Cabinets de

F Europe ; see Segur. Pollock, Sir F., 107, 114-15. Poole, Historical Atlas, 146. Potemkin, 54. President, the, of the United States,

and the conduct of foreign policy,

277-81. Prince, The, 19, 22-3, 25, 31, 46, 76,

149, 151.

Protests of the Lords, 65-6. Prudence, 14, 22, 72-3, 76, 229,

230-4. Public opinion, 70, 73, 264-5, 266-9.

Rabshakeh, 16.

Raison a"tat, 77, 230.

Rastatt, Congress of, 102, 105.

Rechberg, 32, 51.

Recbtslebre, Kant's, 200, 205-7.

Recollections of the Old Foreign Office, 1 66.

Recueil des Instructions donnees aux Ambassadeurs de France ; see In- structions.

Recueil des principaux trait is ; see Martens.

Redcliffe, Stratford de, 10, 30, 251-2, 256-7.

Reform Bill, Bismarck on the, 69.

Reglement of the Narrow Seas, 118.

Reichstag, the, and foreign affairs,

  • 73~5> 2 77-

Renee du Bee, 239. | Report from the Select Committee on


29 1


Diplomatic Service (1861), 9, 10,

12, 21, 166, 251-9. Revolution of 1688-9, estimate of

the, by Sir John Seeley, 169. Richelieu, 43, 239, 240, 245. Ricordi politici e civili, Guicciar-

dinj's, 26.

Rousseau, 77, 87, 180 sqq., 202. Rule of 1756, the, 113, 114. Rumbold, Sir Horace, 30 Ruse, La, et contre-ruse, 220, 230-4. Russell, Lord John, 173, 253, 258-9. Russia, the Court of, and foreign

policy, 53-4.

Rutter of the Sea, The, 125-6. Rymer, Foedera, 144.

Sacerdotium, The, in the Middle Age,

177. g Saint-Pierre, L'Abbe de, 179-81,

184, 185, 187, 194,202. Salisbury, the third Marquess of,

49-50,263-5.

Sang froid, Un homme de, 228-9. Satow, Sir Ernest, 88, in, 113-14,

155, 157760.

Schauenstein, Count Buol, 32. Schleswig-Holstein, 28, 69. Scott, Sir William ; see Stowell. Sea, Dominion, Sovereignty or Supe- riority of the ; see Sovereignty. Sea-Law of Scotland, The, Welwod's,

119-20. Sea-Lawes, An Abridgement of all,

Welwod's, 120-27. 'Secret' diplomacy, 73-5, 253-9,

263-9. ' Secret diplomacy ' of Louis XV,

80-1. Seeley, J. R., 3, 52 ; The Growth of

British Policy, 168-70. Segur, on diplomatic morality and

on the conduct of policy, 35-7,

8r.

Selden, 108, 118, 125, 128, 129-31. Senate, the, in the United States of

America, and the conduct of

foreign policy, 278-81. Senate, the Roman, 51-2.


Septennial Bill, the, 63.

Seymour, Sir G. H., 9.

Shakespeare, 24.

Ship-money, 128-9.

Sidgwick, Henry, 209.

Smuts, General, 70-1, 283.

Social Contract, The ; see Contrat.

Society of Peoples, the, 183 sqq.

Sorel, L'Europe et la Revolution francaise, 164.

Soveraignty of the British Seas, The ; see Boroughs.

Sovereignty of the sea, the, 116-41. See Welwod, Grotius, Boroughs, Selden.

Sovereignty of the Sea, The ; see Fulton.

Spenser, 25.

Spinoza, 32-3, 76-7.

Spy, the ambassador as an honour- able., 218, 228 ; and 17-18.

Stair, the second Earl of, 63.

Stanhope, the first Earl, 34-5, 62, 63, 64.

Stanhope, Philip, 10.

Status quo, 1 59.

Stowell, Lord, 134-5.

Studium, The, in the Middle Age, 177.

Style diplomatique, Le, 87.

Superiority of the sea 5 see Sove- reignty.

Surrey, Thomas Howard, Earl of, third Duke of Norfolk, 73.

' System ' of States, and of policy, A, 165, 189, 191.

Tacitus, 22, 77, 150, 223, 232. Telegraph, the, and diplomacy,

30-1, 159,251-3. Ten, the Council of, 74, 90. Throgmorton, Michael, 47. Thucydides, 22, 223 ; on policy,

democracy and empire, 150-1. Tocqueville, viii, 40-1, 280-1. Torcy, 38.

Tractatus Politicus ; see Spinoza. Tractatus Theologico-Politicus ; see

Spinoza.


Index


Treaties, the force of, 103-4, 108, 1 10,

113, 142-3; Collections of, 142-5;

kinds of, 249-50. Treaty-making power in Britain,

the, 260-3. ' Trent ', the, 69.

  • Trimmer ', the, 38.

Troyes, the Treaty of, 31. Twiss, Sir Travers, 107, 108-12, 126,

130, 136, 142, 21 1 -12. Tyler, President of the United States

of America, 39-41. Tyranny, Machiavelli and Spinoza

on, 76-7.

United States of America, Treat- ment of international questions in the, 277-82.

Uti possidetis, 159.

Utopia, More's, 187, 194.

Utrecht, the Treaty of, 67, 108.

Vail, the, 118, 128, 137.

Valori, 43.

Vasquez (Vasquius), 118, 131.

Vattel, on resident ambassadors, 19 ; on good faith, 33-4; on the balance of power, 79 ; Le Droit des Gens, 96-100.

Vaughan, Stephen, 48.

Venetian ambassadors, 19, 90, 224, 244.

Vera, Antonio de, on persuasive speech, 17; Le Parjait Am- bassadeur, 152-3 ; on the function of the ambassador,2i6-i7; on the qualities of the diplomatist, 220-1, 228 ; on ruse and counter-ruse, 230-3 ; on abstinence from wine, 237 ; on women in diplomacy, 238 ; on instructions, dispatches, cipher, and secrecy, 242-4.

Vettori, 23.

Victoria, Queen, on the Crown and the conduct of foreign policy, 173.

Vienna, Treaties of, 28, 147, 148.


Villari, Macbiaoelli and bis Times,

19,23,26. Vincentius (Lirinensis), no.

Walker, T. A., History of the Law oj Nations, 96, 116, 118.

Walpole, Sir Robert, 34, 62, 63, 65, 66.

Walsingham, Instructions to, 218.

Walton, Izaak, 7, 8.

War as an instrument of policy, Clausewitz on, 163-4.

Wellesley, the Marquess, 52, 259-60.

Welwod, William, 1 1 9 sqq. ; The Sea- Law of Scotland, 119-20; An Abridgement oj all Sea-Lowes, 120-7; De Dominio Marts, 127-8.

Westphalia, Treaty of, 20, 91, 93, 96, 192, 193.

Wheaton, Henry, 14, 20 ; his History of the Law of Nations, and conclusions regarding advances made since the Treaty of West- phalia, 91-4, 95, 96, 99-100; his Elements of International Law, 106- 7, 112, 153-4; on Saint-Pierre's Projet de Paix perpetuelle, 1 80.

Wicquefort, L 'Ambassadeur et ses Fonctions, 153-5, 2I 75 on tnc function of the ambassador, 217- 19 ; on the qualities of the diplo- matist, 221-3, 229, 233-4 ; on the employment of the clergy in embassies, 237-8 ; on instructions, letters, dispatches, and cipher, 244-6 ; on treaties, 249.

William I, King of Prussia, Bis- marck on, 38.

William III, 43, 61, 169, 170.

Wodehouse, Lord, 253-4.

Women and diplomatists, 228 ; as diplomatists, 238-9.

Wotton, Sir Henry, 7, 8.

Wyatt, Sir Thomas, 46.

Wyndham, Sir William, 66-7.

Wyse, Sir T., 9.

Youth in negotiators, 225.


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FRANCE, Mediaeval and Modern, a History by A. HASSALL.

Second Impression 1919. Pp. 320, with seven maps. 6s. 6d. net.

'A quite masterly survey of the course of French history. Essential points are well brought out, and the reader is provided with a clear understanding of the general stream of tendency which caused one phase of the nation's history to follow as a logical sequence upon its predecessors. As a general sketch, useful alike in schools and as a work of con- venient reference, the book is deserving of high praise.' Scotsman.

'This is a history book to be kept near at hand, to be picked up and read at quiet moments and preserved for permanent use as a reference book.' Saturday Review.

A HISTORY OF RUSSIA from the Varangians to the

Bolsheviks. By C. RAYMOND BEAZLEY, NEVILL FORBES, and G. A. BIRKETT, with an introduction by E. BARKER. 1918. Pp. xxii + 6o2, with six maps. 8s. 6d. net.

'Far and away the best Russian history in French or English that we have yet come across. . . . For the first time the average reader has put before him an intelligible and scientific account of the growth of Russia, the development of its institutions, and the rise and fall of its autocracy. . . this book should be in considerable demand.' New Statesman.

' Authoritatively and brilliantly written, beautifully printed and produced. Will take its place as indisputably the standard short history of Russia.' Saturday Westminster.

'We welcome the very timely publication of this admirably designed and composed book.' Times.

ITALY, Mediaeval and Modern, a History by E. M.JAMISON,

C. M. ADY, K. D. VERNON, and C. SANFORD TERRY. 1917. Pp. viii + 564, with eight maps and a preface by H. W. C. DAVIS. 73. 6d. net.

'The best short history of Italy we know.' Irish Times.

1 The kind of book which is so much to be desired. The knowledge is so abundant, the materials so thoroughly at command, and the style as a whole so engaging, that the impression left is that of fine work well and conscientiously done. The authors have com- bined a fine historical judgment with abundant scholarship.' Scottish Historical Review.

PORTUGAL OLD AND YOUNG: An Historical Study

by GEORGE YOUNG. 1917. Pp. viii + 342, with a frontispiece and five maps. 6s. 6d. net.

'A very timely and serviceable work of reference, the whole book is readable and good.' . Guardian.

This brightly written and thoughtful volume . . . illustrated by copious quotations from their literature, and by vivid sketches of the country, of its art and architecture and of the people themselves . . . Of Portuguese poetry Mr. Young gives specimens and his translations are generally excellent.' Times.

'The value of Mr. Young's book is indeed almost inexhaustible. He writes throughout with pleasing originality of thought and expression.' New Europe.

' One of the best-written volumes in a well-written series. 1 Daily News.


THE GUARDIANS OF THE GATE : Historical Lectures

on the Serbs. By R. G. D. LAFFAN, with a foreword by Vice-Admiral E. T. TROUBRIDGE. 1918. Pp. 300, with twenty-two illustrations and three maps. 6s. 6d. net.

' The book has a peculiar excellence due to the fact that it is at once the work of an his- torical scholar, and of a man who has close personal experience of the things about which he is writing. While it thus gains in realism, and occasionally as in the vivid account of the heroic advance of the Serbs on Monastir has a special authority, it is also as the long list of "works consulted" shows informed by a careful scholarship quite remark- able in the circumstances in which it was written.' Times.

'We cannot praise Mr. Laffan'sbook too highly. . . . The. whole book with its excellent photographs forms a useful contribution to war literature and one that should be widely read.' Western Morning- Neva.

JAPAN : the Rise of a Modern Power. By ROBERT P.

PORTER. 1918. Pp. xxii + 362, with five illustrations and five maps. 6s. 6d. net.

' A good book, a book which can fulfil a thoroughly useful function, a book which is not only worth reading, but is also worth buying and keeping.' Tinii-s.

'Tells the reader practically all that he wants to know ... a marvel of compression . . . there is so much in it that is quotable and hardly a page which is not full of instructive interest. . . . No more important book has appeared on Japan for some years.' Cambridge Review.

MODERN CHINA. A Political Study by S. G. CHENG.

1919. Pp. viii + 38o, with two maps and nine documentary appendixes. 6s. 6d. net.

Deals with the important problems which confront Chinese statesmen and diplomatists and those who have anything to do with China. It endeavours tp give a true picture of things as they are in the Far East, and at the same time to suggest constructive schemes for the future.


THE EASTERN QUESTION. An Historical Study in

European Diplomacy. By J. A. R. MARRIOTT. 1917. With eleven maps. 8s. 6d. net.

'Its value to students of contemporary politics is practically incalculable.' Daily Telegraph.

'Pleasant to read, full of information, and giving the mature thought of a man who has made modern history his life-work, it is one of the most valuable historical books I have seen." Dr. Agar Beet in the London Quarterly Review.

'Owing to his vast knowledge of modern Europe and its affairs and his great skill as a writer (Mr. Marriott) has produced a most interesting book. His work should count as the standard treatise on the subject, not alone in this country.' Professor Margoliouth in the Moslem World.

THE GREAT EUROPEAN TREATIES of the Nine-

teenth Century, edited t>y Sir AUGUSTUS OAKES and R. B. MOWAT, with an introduction by Sir H. ERLE RICHARDS. 1918. Pp. xii + 404. with ten maps. is. 6d. net.

  • It was a happy inspiration which suggested the publication in a cheap and handy form

of the texts ot the. principal European treaties of the nineteenth century, together with such ,notes and introductions as would explain their significance. ... It supplies a greatly felt want ... Its numerous uncoloured maps are the best and clearest we remember to have seen.' Times.

'Indispensable to (the student) and of the highest value as a work of reference.'

Glasgow Herald.

DIPLOMACY and the Study of International Relations.

By D. P. HEATLEY. Pp. xvi + 292. [In preparation.

Written for the guidance of historical students and consisting of an essay on Diplomacy and the Conduct of Foreign Policy, followed by a bibliographical section giving advice as to the study of International Relations, General Modern History, the Sovereignty of the Seas, Treaties, &c.


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