Executive Order 12843

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Signed by President  William J. Clinton  Wednesday, April 21, 1993 Federal Register  page & date: 58 FR 21881, Friday, April 23, 1993
See the Notes section for a list of Executive Orders affected by or related to the issuance of this Executive Order.

WHEREAS, the essential function of the stratospheric ozone layer is shielding the Earth from dangerous ultraviolet radiation; and

WHEREAS, the production and consumption of substances that cause the depletion of stratospheric ozone are being rapidly phased out on a worldwide basis with the support and encouragement of the United States; and

WHEREAS, the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, to which the United States is a signatory, calls for a phaseout of the production and consumption of these substances; and

WHEREAS, the Federal Government, as one of the principal users of these substances, is able through affirmative procurement practices to reduce significantly the use of these substances and to provide leadership in their phaseout; and

WHEREAS, the use of alternative substances and new technologies to replace these ozone-depleting substances may contribute positively to the economic competitiveness on the world market of U.S. manufacturers of these innovative safe alternatives;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON, by the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act ("Clean Air Act Amendments"), Public Law 101-549, and in order to reduce the Federal Government's procurement and use of substances that cause stratospheric ozone depletion, do hereby order as follows:


Section 1. Federal Agencies.

Federal agencies shall, to the extent practicable:
(a)
conform their procurement regulations and practices to the policies and requirements of Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments, which deal with stratospheric ozone protection;
(b)
maximize the use of safe alternatives to ozone-depleting substances;
(c)
evaluate the present and future uses of ozone-depleting substances, including making assessments of existing and future needs for such materials and evaluate their use of and plans for recycling;
(d)
revise their procurement practices and implement cost-effective programs both to modify specifications and contracts that require the use of ozone-depleting substances and to substitute non-ozone-depleting substances to the extent economically practicable; and
(e)
exercise leadership, develop exemplary practices, and disseminate information on successful efforts in phasing out ozone-depleting substances.

Sec. 2. Definitions.

(a)
"Federal agency" means any executive department, military department, or independent agency within the meaning of 5 U.S.C. 101, 102, or 104(1), respectively.
(b)
"Procurement" and "acquisition" are used interchangeably to refer to the processes through which Federal agencies purchase products and services.
(c)
"Procurement regulations, policies and procedures" encompasses the complete acquisition process, including the generation of product descriptions by individuals responsible for determining which substances must be acquired by the agency to meet its mission.
(d)
"Ozone-depleting substances" means the substances controlled internationally under the Montreal Protocol and nationally under Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments. This includes both Class I and Class II substances as follows:
(i)
"Class I substance" means any substance designated as Class I in the Federal Register notice of July 30, 1992 (57 Fed. Reg. 33753), including chlorofluorocarbons, halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform and any other substance so designated by the Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") by regulation at a later date; and
(ii)
"Class II substance" means any substance designated as Class II in the Federal Register notice of July 30, 1992 (57 Fed. Reg. 33753), including hydrochlorofluorocarbons and any other substances so designated by EPA by regulation at a later date.
(e)
"Recycling" is used to encompass recovery and reclamation, as well as the reuse of controlled substances.

Sec. 3. Policy.

It is the policy of the Federal Government that Federal agencies:
(i)
implement cost-effective programs to minimize the procurement of materials and substances that contribute to the depletion of stratospheric ozone; and
(ii)
give preference to the procurement of alternative chemicals, products, and manufacturing processes that reduce overall risks to human health and the environment by lessening the depletion of ozone in the upper atmosphere.
In implementing this policy, prior to final promulgation of EPA regulations on Federal procurement, Federal agencies shall begin conforming their procurement policies to the general requirements of Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments by:
(a)
minimizing, where economically practicable, the procurement of products containing or manufactured with Class I substances in anticipation of the phaseout schedule to be promulgated by EPA for Class I substances, and maximizing the use of safe alternatives. In developing their procurement policies, agencies should be aware of the phaseout schedule for Class II substances;
(b)
amending existing contracts, to the extent permitted by law and where practicable, to be consistent with the phaseout schedules for Class I substances. In awarding contracts, agencies should be aware of the phaseout schedule for Class II substances in awarding contracts;
(c)
implementing policies and practices that recognize the increasingly limited availability of Class I substances as production levels capped by the Montreal Protocol decline until final phaseout. Such practices shall include, but are not limited to:
(i)
reducing emissions and recycling ozone-depleting substances;
(ii)
ceasing the purchase of nonessential products containing or manufactured with ozone-depleting substances; and
(iii)
requiring that new contracts provide that any acquired products containing or manufactured with Class I or Class II substances be labeled in accordance with section 611 of the Clean Air Act Amendments.

Sec. 4. Responsibilities.

Not later than 6 months after the effective date of this Executive order, each Federal agency, where feasible, shall have in place practices that, where economically practicable, minimize the procurement of Class I substances. Agencies also shall be aware of the phaseout schedule for Class II substances. Agency practices may include, but are not limited to:
(a)
altering existing equipment and/or procedures to make use of safe alternatives;
(b)
specifying the use of safe alternatives and of goods and services, where available, that do not require the use of Class I substances in new procurements and that limit the use of Class II substances consistent with section 612 of the Clean Air Act Amendments; and;
(c)
amending existing contracts, to the extent permitted by law and where practicable, to require the use of safe alternatives.

Sec. 5. Reporting Requirements.

Not later than 6 months after the effective date of this Executive order, each Federal agency shall submit to the Office of Management and Budget a report regarding the implementation of this order. The report shall include a certification by each agency that its regulations and procurement practices are being amended to comply with this order.

Sec. 6. Exceptions.

Exceptions to compliance with this Executive order may be made in accordance with section 604 of the Clean Air Act Amendments and with the provisions of the Montreal Protocol.

Sec. 7. Effective Date.

This Executive order is effective 30 days after the date of issuance. Although full implementation of this order must await revisions to the Federal Acquisition Regulations ("FAR"), it is expected that Federal agencies will take all appropriate actions in the interim to implement those aspects of the order that are not dependent upon regulatory revision.

Sec. 8. Federal Acquisition Regulatory Councils.

Pursuant to section 6(a) of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, as amended, 41 U.S.C. 405(a), the Defense Acquisition Regulatory Council and the Civilian Agency Acquisition Council shall ensure that the policies established herein are incorporated in the FAR within 180 days from the date this order is issued.

Sec. 9. Judicial Review.

This order does not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable by a non-Federal party against the United States, its officers or employees, or any other person.
Signature of William J. Clinton
William J. Clinton 
The White House,
April 21, 1993.
[FR Doc. Filed]
Billing code 3195-01-P

Notes[edit]

Revoked by:
See Related:


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).