Index:Aboriginesofvictoria01.djvu

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

Aboriginesofvictoria01.djvu

Pages   (key to Page Status)   

- - - - - - - -  i  ii  iii  iv  v  vi  vii  viii  ix  x  xi  xii  xiii  xiv  xv  xvi  xvii  xviii  xix  xx  xxi  xxii  xxiii  xxiv  xxv  xxvi  xxvii  xxviii  xxix  xxx  xxxi  xxxii  xxxiii  xxxiv  xxxv  xxxvi  xxxvii  xxxviii  xxxix  xl  xli  xlii  xliii  xliv  xlv  xlvi  xlvii  xlviii  xlix  l  li  lii  liii  liv  lv  lvi  lvii  lviii  lix  lx  lxi  lxii  lxiii  lxiv  lxv  lxvi  lxvii  lxviii  lxix  lxx  lxxi  lxxii 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 - - 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085 086 087 088 089 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 - - 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 - - - - - - - - - -

CONTENTS-VOL. I.

Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg Rule Segment - Diamond - 4px.svg Rule Segment - Span - 20px.svg


PAGE
Letter to the Honorable the Chief Secretary.
Preface v
List of Illustrations xiii
Introduction xvii
Physical Character.—Height, weight, and size.—Color.—Hair.—Odour.—Senses.—Physical powers.—Use of feet and toes.—Portraits of natives—Victoria and Queensland—Tasmanian—Malayo-Polynesians—Chinese.—Natives of Australia generally.—Half-castes 1
Mental Character.—Capacity and faculties.—Thomas Bungeleen.—Bennilong.—Treatment of whites.—Fidelity.—Courage.—Modes of expressing defiance and contempt.—Modesty.—Affections 22
Numbers and Distribution of the Aborigines.—Estimate made by Sir Thomas Mitchell—By Mr. E. S. Parker—By Mr. Wm. Thomas.—Numbers in the Counties of Bourke, Evelyn, and Mornington.—Character of the country inhabited by the natives.—Available area.—The tribes of the river-basins.—New estimate of the numbers.—Natives seen by Landsborough.—Difficulty of estimating the numbers seen in the bush.—Map showing the areas occupied by tribes.—Names of "petty nations" and tribes.—Number and distribution of natives in 1863 and subsequently.—Number now living.—Number collected at the several Aboriginal stations 31
Birth and Education of Children.—Birth.—Behaviour towards the mother.—Treatment of the infant.—Mode of carrying children.—Nurture.—Procuring food.—Swimming.—Education.—Sports.—Toys.—Natives affectionate and gentle in their treatment of children.—No artificial means used to alter the form of the body of a child.—Infanticide.—Naming children.—Coming of age of young men and young women—Ceremonies in various parts of Australia—Tib-but—Murrum Tur-uk-ur-uk—Jerryale.—Upper Yarra natives.—Lake Tyers.—The Narrinyeri.—Port Lincoln.—New South Wales.—Macleay and Nambucca.—Circumcision 46
Marriage.—Obtaining wives.—Betrothals.—Early marriages.—Elopements—The ordeal.—Condition of a young unmarried man.—Fights.—Maiming the bride.—How matches are made.—Barter.—Meeting of the young man and the young women.—Promiscuous Intercourse not common.—Exogamy.—Classes in Victoria—In South Australia.—Children take the family name of the mother.—A man may not marry a woman of his own class.—Classes at Port Lincoln—In West Australia—In New South Wales—At Port Essington.—Investigations of Fison and Howitt.—Morgan's theories respecting laws of marriage and systems of consanguinity—Bridgman's statements as to the system in Queensland—Stewart's account of that in force at Mount Gambler—Effect of the prohibitions.—Latham's remarks on these laws.—Strezelecki's theory respecting curtailment of power of continuing the species under certain circumstances—Its fallacy exposed.—Statements of Hartmann, Green, and Hagenauer.—A man may not see or speak to his mother-in-law.—Behaviour towards widows.—Marriages of black men with white women 76
Death, and Burial of the Dead.—Carrying the remains of a dead child.—Various modes of disposing of the dead.—A dying native.—Behaviour of the natives.—Death.—Preparation of the body for interment.—Inquest.—Belief in sorcery.—Interment.—Mourning.—The grave.—The widow watching the grave.—Death of a black after sunset.—Revenge.—Burning the bodies of the dead.—Placing bodies in the hollows of trees.—Practices of the Goulburn tribes.—Modes of disposing of the dead on the Lower Murray—Stanbridge's account.—Burial ceremonies of the Narrinyeri—Of the Encounter Bay tribe—Of the Port Lincoln tribe—Of the West Australian blacks— Of the Cooper's Creek tribes—Of the Fraser Island (Queensland) tribes.—Modes of burial of other uncivilized races 98
A Native Encampment and the Daily Life of the Natives.—Travelling.—Cutting bark.—Erection of miams.—Arrangement of camps.—Cooking and eating.—Government of a camp.—Duties of the head of a family.—Domestic affairs.—Punishment of offences.—Messengers.—Visitors.—Welcoming friends.—Great gathering of natives at the Merri Creek.—Respect paid to aged persons.—Kul-ler-kul-lup and Billibillari.—Influence of old men in the camp.—Principal woman of the Colac tribe.—Good haters.—Their affection for their friends.—Bun-ger-ring.—King-er-ra-noul.—King Benbow.—Life during the four seasons.—Natives not always improvident.—Property in land.—Personal rights.—Dogs.—Climbing trees.—Signalling.—Swearing amity.—Fights.—Conveying a challenge.—Dances.—Games and amusements.—An encampment at night.—Traffic amongst the tribes 123
Food.—Hunting the kangaroo.—The opossum.—The wombat.—The native bear.—The bandicoot.—The porcupine.—The native dog.—The native cat.—Squirrels.—Bats.—Smaller marsupials.—The emu.—The turkey.—The native companion.—Ducks and other wild-fowl.—Parrots.—Snaring small birds.—Catching crows.—The turtle.—Reptiles.—Catching fish.—Shell-fish.—Bees.—Pupae of ants.—Grubs.—Eggs.—Vegetable food.—Vegetables that are commonly eaten in various parts of Australia.—Drinks.—Manna.—List of vegetables usually eaten by the natives of Victoria.—Seeds and grinding seeds.—Compungya.—Berries.—Nuts.—Nardoo.—Geebung.—Five-corners.—Nonda.—Bunya-bunya.—Water-yielding trees.—Narcotics.—Food of the natives of Cooper's Creek.—Vegetable food of the natives of the North-East.—Forbidden food.—Mirrn-yongs.—Shell-mounds.—Stone-shelters.—Cannibalism.—The habits of animals as related by the natives 183
Diseases.—Ophthalmia.—Small-pox.—Diseases affecting the natives prior to the advent of the whites.—Native doctors and their methods of treating diseases.—Reports of Thomas and Goodwin on the diseases of the natives 253
Dress and Personal Ornaments.—Dress and ornaments of the natives of the Yarra—Of Gippsland—Of the Lower Murray—Of the natives of North-East Australia—Of the Dieyerie tribe 270
Ornamentation.—Character of the ornamentation of shields and other weapons in Victoria and other parts of Australia.—Pictures on bark.—Design for a tomb-stone.—Ornamentation of opossum rugs.—Pictures in caves.—Pictures on rocks.—Depuch Island.—Colors used.—Raised cicatrices.—Comparison of designs of Australians with those of the natives of New Guinea, Fiji, and New Zealand 283
Offensive Weapons.—Clubs—Kud-jee-run—Kul-luk—Warra-warra—Leon-ile—Kon-nung—Bittergan.—Spears—Mongile—Nandum—Tir-rer—Koanie—Gow-dalie—Worme-goram—Ugie-koanie—Koy-yun.—Spears with stone heads.—Womerah or Gur-reek used for throwing spears.—Throw-sticks—Wonguim—Barn-geet—Li-lil—Quirriang-an-wun.—Various weapons compared.—Boomerangs which return and those which do not return.—Characteristics of the boomerang which returns to the thrower—Its axes.—Errors made in experimenting with throw-sticks.—Egyptian boomerang.—The hunga munga.—The trombash.—The es-sellem.—New boomerang.—Ferguson on the cateia.—Ornamented boomerangs 299
Defensive Weapons.—Shields—Mulga—Gee-am—Goolmarry.—Shields in use at Rockingham Bay 330
Weapons and Implements of the West Australians.—Kylie.—The gid-jee and other spears.—The meero.—The woonda or wooden shield.—The kadjo or stone hammer.—The stone chisel.— The meat-cutter.—The scoop or spade.—Other implements 335
Implements and Manufactures.—Bags and baskets.—Wooden vessels for holding water.—Skins.—Skull drinking cup.—Bark vessels.—Shells.—Tool for scraping.—Tool for carving.—Awls and nails.—The kan-nan.—The nerum.—The weet-weet.—Corrobboree-sticks.—Message-sticks 342
Stone Implements.—Hatchets.—Rocks used.—Quarries.—Palaeolithic and Neolithic periods.—Old axes and chips and flakes found in the soil—Axes not found in the alluvia.—Figures and descriptions of stone tomahawks.—Axe found on Pitcairn's Island.—Uses of the tomahawk.—Chisels and knives.—New Zealand axe.—Chips for spears—For scarring the flesh—For skins and for scraping, &c.—Stones for pounding and grinding seeds.—Sharpening-stones.—Stones used in fishing.—Stones used in basket-making.—Sacred stones 357
Nets and Fish-hooks.—Large net.—Hand-net.—Fibres used in making nets.—Fish-hooks 388
Methods of Producing Fire.—Twirling the upright stick.—Rubbing across a crack with the wooden knife.—Methods of producing fire in various parts of the world.—Holy fires of the Germanic races.—Witchcraft.—Fire produced accidentally.—Volcanoes 393
Canoes.—Bark canoes of the Victorian natives.—How propelled.—Cutting bark for canoes.—Trees yielding bark suitable for making canoes.—Numbers carried in canoes of various sizes.—Natives fishing from canoes.—Statements relating to the canoes in use in various parts of Australia 407
Myths.—Pundjel.— The first men.—The first women.—The dispersion of mankind.— Death.—The man with a tail.—Origin of the sea.—How water was first obtained—The sun.—The moon.—The sun, the moon, and the stars.—Native names of and tales respecting the sun, the moon, and the stars.—The bun-yip.—Myndie.—Kur-bo-roo.—Mirram and Warreen.—Boor-a meel.—The emu and the crow.—The eagle, the mopoke, and the crow.—Mornmoot-bullarto mornmoot.—Loo-errn.—Wi-won-der-rer.—Buk-ker-til-lible.—The River Murray.—Nrung-a-narguna.—Kootchee.—Fire—How Fire was first obtained.—Priests and sorcerers.—Marm-bu-la.—Bowkan, Brewin, and Bullundoot.—Aboriginal legend of a deluge.—The Port Albert frog.—How the black fellows lost and regained fire.—The native dog.—The history of Bolgan 423