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Index:Don Quixote (Cervantes, Ormsby) Volume 2.djvu

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Don Quixote (Cervantes, Ormsby) Volume 2.djvu

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CONTENTS


VOL. II.




Page
PREFACE xi
CHAPTER
I. Of the interview the Curate and the Barber had with Don Quixote about his malady 1
II. Which treats of the notable altercation which Sancho Panza had with Don Quixote's niece and housekeeper, together with other droll matters, 12
III. Of the laughable conversation that passed between Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, and the bachelor Samson Carrasco 17
IV. In which Sancho Panza gives a satisfactory reply to the doubts and questions of the bachelor Samson Carrasco, together with other matters worth knowing and mentioning 25
V. Of the shrewd and droll conversation that passed between Sancho Panza and his wife Teresa Panza, and other matters worthy of being duly recorded, 30
VI. Of what took place between Don Quixote and his niece and housekeeper; one of the most important chapters in the whole history 36
VII. Of what passed between Don Quixote and his squire, together with other very notable incidents 42
VIII. Wherein is related what befell Don Quixote on his way to see his lady Dulcinea del Toboso 49
IX. Wherein is related what will be seen there 56
X. Wherein is related the crafty device Sancho adopted to enchant the Lady Dulcinea, and other incidents as ludicrous as they are true 60
XI. Of the strange adventure which the valiant Don Quixote had with the car or cart of "The Cortes of Death" 68 </noinclude>
XII. Of the strange adventure which befell the valiant Don Quixote with the bold Knight of the Mirrors 74
XIII. In which is continued the adventure of the Knight of the Grove, together with the sensible, original, and tranquil colloquy that passed between the two squires 81
XIV. Wherein is continued the adventure of the Knight of the Grove 87
XV. Wherein it is told and made known who the Knight of the Mirrors and his squire were 97
XVI. Of what befell Don Quixote with a discreet gentleman of La Mancha 99
XVII. Wherein is shown the furthest and highest point which the unexampled courage of Don Quixote reacfled or could reach; together with the happily achieved adventure of the lions 108
XVIII. Of what happened to Don Quixote in the castle or house of the Knight of the Green Gaban, together with other matters out of the common 119
XIX. In which is related the adventure of the enamoured shepherd, together with other truly droll incidents 128
XX. Wherein an account is given of the wedding of Camacho the rich, together with the incident of Basilio the poor 135
XXI. In which Camacho's wedding is continued, with other delightful incidents 143
XXII. Wherein is related the grand adventure of the cave of Montesinos in the heart of La Mancha, which the valiant Don Quixote brought to a happy termination 149
XXIII. Of the wonderful things the incomparable Don Quixote said he saw in the profound cave of Montesinos, the impossibility and magnitude of which cause this adventure to be deemed apocryphal 157
XXIV. Wherein are related a thousand trifling matters, as trivial as they are necessary to the right understanding of this great history 167
XXV. Wherein is set down the braying adventure, and the droll one of the puppet-showman, together with the memorable divinations of the divining ape 174
XXVI. Wherein is continued the droll adventure of the puppet-showman, together with other things in truth right good 182
XXVII. Wherein it is shown who Master Pedro and his ape were, together with the mishap Don Quixote had in the braying adventure, which he did not conclude as he would have liked or as he had expected 190
XXVIII. Of matters that Benengeli says he who reads them will know, if he reads them with attention 196
XXIX. Of the famous adventure of the enchanted bark 201
XXX. Of Don Quixote's adventure with a fair huntress 207
XXXI. Which treats of many and great matters 212
XXXII. Of the reply Don Quixote gave his censurer, with other incidents, grave and droll 220
XXXIII. Of the delectable discourse which the duchess and her damsels held with Sancho Panza, well worth reading and noting 233
XXXIV. Which relates how they learned the way in which they were to disenchant the peerless Dulcinea del Toboso, which is one of the rarest adventures in this book 240
XXXV. Wherein is continued the instruction given to Don Quixote touching the disenchantment of Dulcinea, together with other marvellous incidents 248
XXXVI. Wherein is related the strange and undreamt of adventure of the Distressed Duenna, alias the Countess Trifaldi, together with a letter which Sancho Panza wrote to his wife, Teresa Panza 254
XXXVII. Wherein is continued the notable adventure of the Distressed Duenna 260
XXXVIII. Wherein is told the Distressed Duenna's tale of her misfortunes 263
XXXIX. In which the Trifaldi continues her marvellous and memorable story 268
XL. Of matters relating and belonging to this adventure and to this memorable history 271
XLI. Of the arrival of Clavileño and the end of this protracted adventure 276
XLII. Of the counsels which Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza before he set out to govern the island, together with other well-considered matters 286
XLIII. Of the second set of counsels Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza 291
XLIV. How Sancho Panza was conducted to his government, and of the strange adventure that befell Don Quixote in the castle 297
XLV. Of how the great Sancho Panza took possession of his island, and of how he made a beginning in governing 307
XLVI. Of the terrible bell and cat fright that Don Quixote got in the course of the enamoured Altisidora's wooing 314
XLVII. Wherein is continued the account of how Sancho Panza conducted himself in his government 318
XLVIII. Of what befell Don Quixote with Doña Rodriguez, the duchess's duenna, together with other occurrences worthy of record and eternal remembrance 326
XLIX. Of what happened to Sancho Panza in making the round of his island 334
L. Wherein is set forth who the enchanters and executioners were who flogged the duenna and pinched Don Quixote, and also what befell the page who carried the letter to Teresa Panza, Sancho Panza's wife 344
LI. Of the progress of Sancho's government, and other such entertaining matters 352
LII. Wherein is related the adventure of the second distressed or afflicted duenna, otherwise called Doña Rodriguez 359
LIII. Of the troublous end and termination Sancho Panza's government came to 365
LIV. Which deals with matters relating to this history and no other 370
LV. Of what befell Sancho on the road, and other things that cannot be surpassed 378
LVI. Of the prodigious and unparalleled battle that took place between Don Quixote of La Mancha and the lackey Tosilos in defence of the daughter of the duenna Doña Rodriguez 385
LVII. Which treats of how Don Quixote took leave of the duke, and of what followed with the witty and impudent Altisidora, one of the duchess's damsels 390
LVIII. Which tells how adventures came crowding on Don Quixote in such numbers that they gave one another no breathing-time 394
LIX. Wherein is related the strange thing, which may be regarded as an adventure, that happened to Don Quixote 404
LX. Of what happened to Don Quixote on his way to Barcelona 412
LXI. Of what happened to Don Quixote on entering Barcelona, together with other matters that partake of the true rather than of the ingenious 424
LXII. Which deals with the adventure of the enchanted head, together with other trivial matters which cannot be left untold 427
LXIII. Of the mishap that befell Sancho Panza through the visit to the galleys, and the strange adventure of the fair Morisco 439
LXIV. Treating of the adventure which gave Don Quixote more unhappiness than all that had hitherto befallen him 448
LXV. Wherein is made known who the Knight of the White Moon was; likewise Don Gregorio's release, and other events 452
LXVI. Which treats of what he who reads will see, or what he who has it read to him will hear 457
LXVII. Of the resolution which Don Quixote formed to turn shepherd and take to a life in the fields while the year for which he had given his word was running its course; with other events truly delectable and happy 462
LXVIII. Of the bristly adventure that befell Don Quixote 466
LXIX. Of the strangest and most extraordinary adenture that befell Don Quixote in the whole course of this great history 471
LXX. Which follows sixty-nine and deals with matters indispensable for the clear comprehension of this history 476
LXXI. Of what passed between Don Quixote and his squire Sancho on the way to thier village 483
LXXII. Of how Don Quixote and Sancho reached their village 488
LXXIII. Of the omens Don Quixote had as he entered his own village, and other incidents that embellish and give a color to this great history 493
LXXIV. Of how Don Quixote fell sick, and of the will he made, and how he died 497





APPENDICES.

I. The Proverbs of Don Quixote 505
II. The Spanish Romances of Chivalry 528
III. Bibliography of Don Quixote 542