Letter from Florence Earle Coates to Miss Katherine Brégy (24 September 1912)

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Letter from Florence Earle Coates to Miss Katherine Brégy (24 September 1912)
by Florence Earle Coates


Miss Katherine Brégy

 2033 N. Broad Street

  Philadelphia

   U.S.A

F.E.C.

September 24/12

Dear Miss Brégy:—

I have thought of you many, many times since we steamed away from our native shores, bearing your most kind letter with us. It was my intention to write immediately we should have seen the Meynells, but I was ill following that delightful experience, and since my recovery the pressure of daily and hourly events, plus proof-reading &c. &c. for my new volume which the Houghton, Mifflins are desirous of bringing out in time for the Christmas sales—the book to be called "The Unconquered Air, and other Poems," have sadly interrupted my correspondence. However, I have but thought of you the more.

It would I think gratify you could you know how generously and how delightfully Mr. & Mrs. Meynell honoured your introduction. Indeed we were received by them with the most beautiful hospitality—a hospitality such as one rarely looks to find outside of America—and we look back to our visits to them,— I hope we did not tax them by too full an acceptance of their gracious welcome,—as amongst the most charming of our English experiences.

We so liked them all! Afterward, I put into verse something of my feeling for dear Mrs. Meynell which will be included, in a somewhat reversed shape, in my new volume. Naturally we talked much of you, and Mrs. Meynell said she should write you of our visit.

There will be much of which we shall wish to talk when we meet, which will I trust be soon, as we expect to be in our home—if not quite settled there—by the first of November.

Now I must only send you my love and my renewed thanks, and beg you to believe me always

 Faithfully and affectionately yours,

  Florence Earle Coates


Miss Katherine Brégy

 Philadelphia


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1927, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.