Page:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 4.djvu/682

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666
HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH.
HÄNDEL-GESELLSCHAFT.
  1. Latin Church Music, about 1702, 1707, 1718, 1735–45.
  2. Oratorio: Resurrezione (Italian), 1708.
  3. Do. Esther, 1st version ('Haman and Mordecai,' a masque), about 1720.
  4. Do. Esther. 2nd version, 1732.
  5. Do. Joseph, 1743.
  6. Do. Occasional, 1746.
  7. Do. Jephtha, 1751.
  8. Do. Messiah, 1741.
  9. Birthday Ode and Alceste.
  10. Instrumental Music for full orchestra (*Concerto in F. about 1715; Water Music, 1715; *Concertos in F and D; Firework Music, 1749; Double Concerto in B♭, 1740–50 (?); *Double Concerto in F, 1740–50 (?)).
  11. Organ and miscellaneous instrumental music.
  12. German, Italian, and English songs and airs.
  13. Italian Cantatas, with bass, vol. 1.
  14. Do. vol. 2.
  15. Italian Cantatas, with instruments, vol. 1. 63.
  16. Do. vol. 2.
  17. Serenata: Il Parnasso in festa. 1734.
  18. * Opera: Almira (German), 1704.
  19. * Do. Rodrigo, 1707.
  20. Do. Agrippina, 1709.
  21. * Do. Rinaldo, 1711.
  22. * Do. II Pastor FIdo. 1712.
  23. Do. Teseo, 1712.
  24. * Do. Silla, 1714.
  25. * Do. Amadigi, 1715.
  26. * Do. Radamisto, 1720.
  27. * Do. Muzio Scevola, Act 3, 1721.
  28. * Do. Floridante, 1721.
  29. * Do. Ottone, 1722.
  30. * Do. Flavio, 1723.
  31. Do. Giulio Cesare, 1723.
  32. * Do. Tamerlano, 1724.
  33. * Do. Rodelinda, 1725.
  34. * Do. Scipione, 1726.
  35. * Do. Alessandro, 1726.
  36. * Do. Admeto, 1726.
  37. * Do. Riccardo, 1727.
  38. * Do. Siroe, 1728.
  39. * Do. Tolomeo, 1728.
  40. * Do. Lotario, 1729.
  41. * Do. Partenope, 1730.
  42. * Do. Poro, 1731.
  43. * Do. Ezio. 1732.
  44. Do. Sosarme, 1732.
  45. * Do. Orlando, 1732.
  46. * Do. Arianna, 1733.
  47. Do. Terpsichore and second Pastor Fido, 1734.
  48. * Do. Ariodante, 1734.
  49. * Do. Alcina, 1735.
  50. * Do. Atalanta, 1736.
  51. * Do. Giustino, 1736.
  52. * Do. Arminio, 1736.
  53. * Do. Berenice, 1737.
  54. * Do. Faramondo, 1737.
  55. * Do. Serse, 1738.
  56. * Do. Imeneo, 1738–40.
  57. Do. Deidamia, 1740.
  58. Aci e Galatea (Italian), 1708 and 1732.
  59. Miscellaneous Vocal pieces.
  60. Oratorio: Jephtha, facsimile of Handel's MS. score.
  61. and 99. Facsimiles of Handel's autographs.

100. Thematic Catalogue of Handel's works.

[ R. M. ]

HANOVER. This spirited tune has been frequently ascribed to Handel, but cannot be by him, as it is found in 'A Supplement to the New Version of the Psalms,' 6th ed. 1708, two years before Handel arrived in England. In the Supplement it is given as follows:—

{ \time 3/2 \key bes \major \partial 2 << \relative f' { f2^\markup { \smaller \italic "a 2 voc." } bes bes c d1 f2 bes, c a bes1 \bar "||" c2 d c bes a1 bes2 c \grace bes4 a2 \grace g4 f2 f1 \bar "||" a2 bes c d bes g ees' d c bes f'1 \bar "||" f,2 g a bes c f, d' g, c a bes1 \bar "||" }
\new Staff { \clef bass \key bes \major \relative b, { bes2 bes bes f' bes1 a2 g ees f | bes,1 f'2 bes a g f1 bes,2 a bes c | f,1 d'2 g a fis g g a bes a g | f1 \bar "||" d2 ees f g f d bes ees c f bes,1 } } >> }

The tune is anonymous, but is not improbably by Dr. Croft, the reputed editor of the 6th edition of the Supplement.

[ G. A. C. ]

HANOVER SQUARE ROOMS. P. 661a, l. 9, for details of the concert see vol. ii. p. 396a, note 1. Line 39, for 1866 read 1869.

HARINGTON, Henry, M.D. See vol. i, p. 691.

HARMONIC MINOR is the name applied to that version of the minor scale which contains the minor sixth together with the major seventh, and in which no alteration is made in ascending and descending. Its introduction as a substitute for the old-fashioned or 'Arbitrary' minor scale was strongly advocated by Dr. Day and others [see Day, vol. i. p. 436a], and of late years it has been very generally adopted. It is true that its use is calculated to impress the learner with a sense of the real characteristics of the minor mode, but its merits are counterbalanced by the awkwardness arising from the augmented second between the sixth and seventh notes, while it is difficult to regard it as a diatonic scale at all, in spite of its theoretical correctness.

[ M. ]

HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH, THE. Handel's variations on the air known in England as 'The Harmonious Blacksmith' were originally printed in No. 5 of his first set of 'Suites de Pièces, pour le Clavecin,' in Nov. 1720. As no name is there given to the air, and even down to the time of the late Robert Birchall it was still published only as 'Handel's Fifth favourite Lesson from his first Suite de Piéces,' it has been generally assumed to be Handel's composition as well as the variations. Upon this point, however, doubts have arisen since Handel's death, and various claims have been put forth, of which at least one still remains undecided. The first claim was in 'Anthologie Française, ou Chansons choisies depuis le treizième siècle jusqu'à présent' (Paris, 3 vols. 8vo, 1765). The editor of that work was J. Monnet, and, according to M. Fetis, 'ce recueil est estimé.' In the first volume are the following eight lines, printed to the air, and ascribed to Clement Marot:—

Plus no suis que j'ai été,
 Et plus ne saurais jamaia l'être;
Mon beau priutems et mon été,
 Ont fait le saut par la fenêtre:
Amour! tu as été mon maître.
 Je t'ai servi sur tous les dieux:
Ah! si je pouvais deux fois naître,
 Combien je te servirais mieux!