Page:A Study of Mexico.djvu/21

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CONTENTS.
PAGE


of a leading Mexican cotton-factory—Free trade and protection not matters of general interest in Mexico—Characteristics of the Mexican tariff system—Mines and mining—The United States, not Mexico, the great silver-producing country—Popular ideas about old Spanish mines without foundation

133

CHAPTER VIII.

Taxation in Mexico—Each State and town its own custom-houses—Practical illustrations of the effect of the system—Cost of importing a stove from St. Louis—Export taxes—Mexican taxation a Telic of European mediaevalism—The excise or internal tax system of Mexico—A continuation of the old "alcavala" tax of Spain—Effect of taxation upon general trade—The method of remedy most difficult—Parallel experience of other countries—Greatest obstacle to tax reform in Mexico

163

CHAPTER IX.

The Federal budget—Receipts and expenditures—Principal sources of national revenue—Foreign commerce—Coinage of the Mexican mints—Imports and exports—The United States the largest customer for Mexican products—Silver monometallism in Mexico—Its inconveniences and abandonment—Introduction of paper money—Sanitary conditions of Mexico—Terrible mortality of the cities of Mexico and Vera Cruz

188

CHAPTER X.

Political relations, present and prospective, of the United States and Mexico—The border population—Their interests, opinions, and influence—The bearing of the Monroe doctrine—The United States no friends on the American Continent—Opinions of other nations in respect to the United States—Adverse sentiments in Mexico—Enlightened policy of the present Mexican Government—Religious toleration—Recent general progress—Claims of Mexico on the kindly sympathies of the United States—Public debt of Mexico—Interoceanic transit and traffic

207