Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/54

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14
HOURS OF IDLENESS.


10.

This is the deepest of our woes,
 For this these tears our cheeks bedew;
This is of love the final close,
 Oh, God! the fondest, last adieu!

1805.


FRAGMENTS OF SCHOOL EXERCISES: FROM THE "PROMETHEUS VINCTUS" OF ÆSCHYLUS.

Μηδάμ' ὁ πάντα νέμων, κ.τ.λ.[1]

 Great Jove! to whose Almighty Throne
  Both Gods and mortals homage pay,
 Ne'er may my soul thy power disown,
  Thy dread behests ne'er disobey.
 Oft shall the sacred victim fall,
 In sea-girt Ocean's mossy hall;
 My voice shall raise no impious strain,
'Gainst him who rules the sky and azure main.

· · · · ·

 How different now thy joyless fate,
  Since first Hesione thy bride,
 When plac'd aloft in godlike state,
  The blushing beauty by thy side,

  1. [The Greek heading does not appear in the Quarto, nor in the three first Editions.]