The Bhagavad Gita (Arnold translation)

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The Bhagavad Gita  (1885) 
by Vyasa, translated by Edwin Arnold
The Bhagavad Gītā (Sanskrit: भगवद्गीता, IPA: [ˈbʱəɡəʋəd̪ ɡiːˈt̪aː], "Song of God"), also more simply known as Gita, is a Sanatana Dharma or Hindu scripture produced from the colloquy given by Sri Krishna to Arjuna during the Kurukshetra War. Its philosophies and insights are intended to reach beyond the scope of religion and to humanity as a whole. The context of the Gita is a conversation between Lord Krishna and the Pandava prince Arjuna taking place on the battlefield before the start of the Kurukshetra War. Responding to Arjuna's confusion and moral dilemma about fighting his own cousins, Lord Krishna explains to Arjuna his duties as a warrior and prince, and elaborates on different Yogic and Vedantic philosophies, with examples and analogies.— Excerpted from Bhagavad Gita on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.