The Young Moslem Looks at Life

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The Young Moslem Looks at Life  (1937) 
by Murray Thurston Titus
The Young Moslem Looks at Life - Cover.png

THE
YOUNG MOSLEM
LOOKS AT LIFE



By Murray T. Titus



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FRIENDSHIP PRESS

New York


MURRAY T. TITUS, D.D., Ph.D., has since 1910 been a missionary to the Moslem peoples of North India. He has received degrees from Ohio Wesleyan University and the Hartford Seminary Foundation, and has studied at the University of Chicago. Upon the completion of his college course he was sent to India under the auspices of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and during the first three years of his service there taught philosophy in Reid (now Lucknow) Christian College. In 1916 he was made a district superintendent in the North India Conference, a position which he still holds. In 1932–33 he was convener of the Committee on Work among Moslems of the National Christian Council of India, Burma and Ceylon, and in 1935 he was one of the Council's representatives at the meeting of the International Missionary Council at Northfield, Massachusetts. Dr. Titus is an associate editor of The Moslem World and is a frequent contributor to that quarterly. He is co-editor of the Religious Quest of India series, to which he has contributed Indian Islam, a volume published in 1930 by the Oxford University Press.


Copyright, 1937, BY G. Q. LeSourd

Printed in the United States of America


TO

THE CHRISTIAN YOUNG PEOPLE

OF THE WEST

CONTENTS
PREFACE ix
I. IN THE WAY OF ALLAH 1
II. THE LAST OF THE PROPHETS 23
Arabia in Mohammed's Time.—Early Life of Mohammed.—Mohammed's Revelations from Allah.—Mohammed's Early Preaching.—Mohammed as Prophet-King.—The Spread of Islam.—"The Greatest of the Prophets."
III. THE PERFECT RELIGION 40
Why the "Perfect Religion"?—The Creed of Islam.—The Moslem's Articles of Faith.—The Sects of Islam.—The Dervish Orders.—Bahaism.
IV. THE STRAIGHT PATH 64
The Ritual of Islam.—The Five Duties of a Moslem.—Rewards and Punishments.
V. HOME AND THE FAMILY 85
Challenging the Purdah System.—Marriage in Islam.—Divorce.—Religious Education of Children.—Celebration of Holy Days.—Amusements.
VI. POLITICS AND RELIGION 104
Three Points of View on Islamic Reform.—Islam as a Political Power.—Holy War.—The Wane of Islamic Political Power.—Moslem Brotherhood.—The Moslem Missionary.—Moslem Religious Intolerance.—Religious Regulation of Public Questions.
VII. THE YOUNG MOSLEM LOOKS AT CHRISTIANITY 128
Moslem Misconceptions of Christianity.—Moslem Appreciation of Jesus.—The Christian Contribution to Moslem Lives.—Heroic Converts to Christianity.
VIII. ISLAM CHALLENGES THE WORLD 148
The Ahmadiya Movement.—Abdul Hamid and Pan-Islamism.—The Challenge of Need.—The Opportunity for Medical Missions.—The Open Door of Education.—The Young Moslem Looks at Religion.—The Challenge to Christianity.
GLOSSARY 172
READING LIST 175
INDEX 179

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was legally published within the United States (or the United Nations Headquarters in New York subject to Section 7 of the United States Headquarters Agreement) before 1964, and copyright was not renewed.
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The author died in 1964, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 30 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.


Works published in 1937 would have had to renew their copyright in either 1964 or 1965, i.e. at least 27 years after it was first published / registered but not later than 31 December(31 December) in the 28th year. As it was not renewed, it entered the public domain on 1 January 1966(1 January 1966).