An Outcast

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Contents[edit]

  • Preface.
  • Chapter I— Charleston.
  • Chapter II— The house of a very distinguished lady.
  • Chapter III— In which the reader is presented with a varied picture.
  • Chapter IV— A few reflections on the cure of vice.
  • Chapter V— In which Mr. Snivel, commonly called the accommodation man, is introduced, and what takes place between him and Mrs. Swiggs.
  • Chapter VI— Containing sundry matters appertaining to this history.
  • Chapter VII— In which is seen a commingling of citizens.
  • Chapter VIII— What takes place between George Mullholland and Mr. Snivel.
  • Chapter IX— In which a gleam of light is shed on the history of Anna Bonard.
  • Chapter X— A continuation of George Mullholland's history.
  • Chapter XI— In which the reader is introduced to Mr. Absalom Mcarthur.
  • Chapter XII— In which are matters the reader may have anticipated.
  • Chapter XIII— Mrs. Swiggs comes to the rescue of the house of the foreign missions.
  • Chapter XIV— Mr. Mcarthur makes a discovery.
  • Chapter XV— What Madame Flamingo wants to be.
  • Chapter XVI— In which Tom Swiggs gains his liberty, and what befalls him.
  • Chapter XVII— In which there is an interesting meeting.
  • Chapter XVIII— Anna Bonard seeks an interview with the antiquary.
  • Chapter XIX— A secret interview.
  • Chapter XX— Lady Swiggs encounters difficulties on her arrival in New York.
  • Chapter XXI— Mr. Snivel pursues his search for the vote-cribber.
  • Chapter XXII— Mrs. Swiggs falls upon a modern heathen world.
  • Chapter XXIII— In which the very best intentions are seen to fail.
  • Chapter XXIV— Mr. Snivel advises George Mullholland how to make strong love.
  • Chapter XXV— A slight change in the picture.
  • Chapter XXVI— In which a high functionary is made to play a singular part.
  • Chapter XXVII— The house of the nine nations, and what may be seen in it.
  • Chapter XXVIII— In which is presented another picture of the house of the nine nations.
  • Chapter XXIX— In which may be seen a few of our common evils.
  • Chapter XXX— Containing various things appertaining to this history.
  • Chapter XXXI— The keno den, and what may be seen in it.
  • Chapter XXXII— Which a state of society is slightly revealed.
  • Chapter XXXIII— In which there is a singular revelation.
  • Chapter XXXIV— The two pictures.
  • Chapter XXXV— In which a little light is shed upon the character of our chivalry.
  • Chapter XXXVI— In which a law is seen to serve base purposes.
  • Chapter XXXVII— A short chapter of ordinary events.
  • Chapter XXXVIII— A story without which this history would be found wanting.
  • Chapter XXXIX— A story with many counterparts.
  • Chapter XL— In which the law is seen to conflict with our cherished chivalry.
  • Chapter XLI— In which justice is seen to be very accommodating.
  • Chapter XLII— In which some light is thrown on the plot of this history.
  • Chapter XLIII— In which is revealed the one error that brought so much suffering upon many.
  • Chapter XLIV— In which is recorded events the reader may not have expected.
  • Chapter XLV— Another shade of the picture.
  • Chapter XLVI— Gaining strength from persecution.
  • Chapter XLVII— An excitement.
  • Chapter XLIX— All's well.

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.