Author:Thomas George Bonney

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Thomas George Bonney
(1833–1923)
FRS, FGS; English geologist
This author wrote articles for the Dictionary of National Biography, and the list on this page is complete to 1901.
Articles written by this author are designated in the DNB by the initials "T. G. B."
Thomas George Bonney

Works[edit]

Scientific[edit]

Other works[edit]

  • The Holy Places at Jerusalem, or, Fergusson's theories and Pierotti's discoveries (1864) (External scan)
  • The Alpine regions of Switzerland and the neighbouring countries ; a pedestrian's notes on their physical features, scenery, and natural history (1868) (External scan)
  • Christian doctrines and modern thought (1892) (External scan)
  • Charles Lyell and modern geology (1895) (External scan)
  • Eminent living geologists : The Rev. Professor T. G. Bonney (1901)
  • The Mediterranean, its storied cities and venerable ruins (1904) (External scan)
  • Annals of the Philosophical Club of the Royal Society (1919) (External scan)
  • Memories of a long life (1921)

Articles in Popular Science Monthly[edit]

Edited works[edit]

  • Papers and notes on the genesis and matrix of the diamond (1897) (External scan)

Lectures[edit]

  • Old truths in modern lights: the Boyle lectures for 1890 with other sermons (1891) (External scan)
  • The Foundation-stones of the Earth An address delivered before the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at the Bath meeting, September 10, 1888.

Pamphlets[edit]

Contributions to the DNB[edit]

main volumes
first supplement
second supplement

Works about Bonney[edit]


Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1, 1923.


The author died in 1923, so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.