The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

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The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit  (1844) 
by Charles Dickens

[1844: Chapman and Hall, London: probably first edition. Illustrated by Hablot Knight Browne ("Phiz").] Commonly known as Martin Chuzzlewit, it is considered as Charles Dickens' last picaresque novel. The novel was originally serialised between 1842 and 1844. Excerpted from Martin Chuzzlewit on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

THE

LIFE AND ADVENTURES

OF

MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT.

Frontis--Martin Chuzzlewit (Phiz).jpg

Title illus 2--Martin Chuzzlewit (Phiz).jpg

THE

LIFE AND ADVENTURES

OF

MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT.

BY CHARLES DICKENS.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY PHIZ.

LONDON:
CHAPMAN AND HALL, 186, STRAND.


MDCCCXLIV.

LONDON:

BRADBURY AND EVANS, PRINTERS, WHITEFRIARS.

TO

MISS BURDETT COUTTS,

This Tale

IS DEDICATED,

WITH THE TRUE AND EARNEST REGARD

OF

THE AUTHOR.

PREFACE.

I attach a few preliminary words to the Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit: more because I am unwilling to depart from any custom which has become endeared to me by having prevailed between myself and my readers on former occasions of the same kind, than because I have anything particular to say.

Like a troublesome guest who lingers in the Hall after he has taken leave, I cannot help loitering on the threshold of my book, though those two words, The End: anticipated through twenty months, yet sorrowfully penned at last: stare at me, in capitals, from the printed page.

I set out, on this journey which is now concluded; with the design of exhibiting, in various aspects, the commonest of all the vices. It is almost needless to add, that the commoner the folly or the crime which an author endeavours to illustrate, the greater is the risk he runs of being charged with exaggeration; for, as no man ever yet recognised an imitation of himself, no man will admit the correctness of a sketch in which his own character is delineated, however faithfully.

But, although Mr. Pecksniff will by no means concede to me, that Mr. Pecksniff is natural; I am consoled by finding him keenly susceptible of the truthfulness of Mrs. Gamp. And though Mrs. Gamp considers her own portrait to be quite unlike, and altogether out of drawing; she recompenses me for the severity of her criticism on that failure, by awarding unbounded praise to the picture of Mrs. Prig.

I have endeavoured in the progress of this Tale, to resist the temptation of the current Monthly Number, and to keep a steadier eye upon the general purpose and design. With this object in view, I have put a strong constraint upon myself from time to time, in many places; and I hope the story is the better for it, now.

At any rate, if my readers have derived but half the pleasure and interest from its perusal, which its composition has afforded me, I have ample reason to be gratified. And if they part from any of my visionary friends, with the least tinge of that reluctance and regret which I feel in dismissing them; my success has been complete, indeed.


London,
Twenty-fifth June, 1844.

CONTENTS.

  1. Chapter I.—Introductory, concerning the Pedigree of the Chuzzlewit Family 1
  2. Chap. II.—Wherein certain Persons are presented to the Reader, with whom he may, if he please, become better acquainted 6
  3. Chap. III.—In which certain other Persons are introduced; on the same Terms as in the last Chapter 19
  4. Chap. IV.—From which it will appear that if Union be Strength, and Family Affection be pleasant to contemplate, the Chuzzlewits were the strongest and most agreeable Family in the World 33
  5. Chap. V.—Containing a full Account of the Installation of Mr. Pecksniff's new Pupil into the Bosom of Mr. Pecksniff's Family. With all the Festivities held on that Occasion, and the great Enjoyment of Mr. Pinch 48
  6. Chap. VI.—Comprises, among other important Matters, Pecksniffian and Architectural, an exact Relation of the Progress made by Mr. Pinch in the Confidence and Friendship of the New Pupil 65
  7. Chap. VII.—In which Mr. Chevy Slyme asserts the Independence of his Spirit; and the Blue Dragon loses a Limb 76
  8. Chap. VIII.—Accompanies Mr. Pecksniff and his charming Daughters to the City of London; and relates what fell out, upon their way thither 88
  9. Chap. IX.—Town and Todgers's 97
  10. Chap. X.—Containing strange Matter; on which many Events in this History, may, for their good or evil Influence, chiefly depend 117
  11. Chap. XI.—Wherein a certain Gentleman becomes particular in his Attentions to a certain Lady; and more Coming Events than one, cast their Shadows before 129
  1. Chap. XII.—Will be seen in the Long Run, if not in the Short One, to concern Mr. Pinch and Others, nearly. Mr. Pecksniff asserts the Dignity of outraged Virtue; and Young Martin Chuzzlewit forms a desperate Resolution 145
  2. Chap. XIII.—Showing, what became of Martin and his desperate Resolve, after he left Mr. Pecksniff's House; what Persons he Encountered; what Anxieties he Suffered; and what News he Heard 161
  3. Chap. XIV.—In which Martin bids Adieu to the Lady of his Love; and Honours an obscure Individual whose Fortune he intends to make, by commending her to his Protection 177
  4. Chap. XV.—The Burden whereof, is Hail Columbia! 186
  5. Chap. XVI.—Martin Disembarks from that noble and fast-sailing Line of Packet Ship, "The Screw," at the Port of New York, in the United States of America. He makes some Acquaintances, and Dines at a Boarding-house. The Particulars of those Transactions 193
  6. Chap. XVII.—Martin enlarges his Circle of Acquaintance; increases his Stock of Wisdom; and has an excellent Opportunity of comparing his own Experiences with those of Lummy Ned of the Light Salisbury, as related by his Friend Mr. William Simmons 210
  7. Chap. XVIII.—Does Business with the House of Anthony Chuzzlewit and Son, from which One of the Partners retires unexpectedly 225
  8. Chap. XIX.—The Reader is brought into Communication with some Professional Persons, and sheds a Tear over the Filial Piety of good Mr. Jonas 233
  9. Chap. XX.—Is a Chapter of Love 246
  10. Chap. XXI.—More American Experiences. Martin takes a Partner, and makes a Purchase. Some Account of Eden, as it appeared on Paper. Also of the British Lion. Also of the kind of Sympathy professed and entertained, by the Watertoast Association of United Sympathizers 257
  11. Chap. XXII.—From which it will be seen that Martin became a Lion on his own Account. Together with the Reason why 273
  12. Chap. XXIII.—Martin and his Partner take Possession of their Estate. The Joyful Occasion involves some further Account of Eden 281
  13. Chap. XXIV.— Reports Progress in certain homely Matters of Love, Hatred, Jealousy, and Revenge 289
  14. Chap. XXV.—Is in part Professional; and furnishes the Reader with some Valuable Hints in relation to the Management of a Sick Chamber 302
  15. Chap. XXVI.—An Unexpected Meeting, and a Promising Prospect 314
  1. Chap. XXVII.—Showing that Old Friends may not only appear with New Faces, but in False Colours. That People are prone to Bite; and that Biters may sometimes be Bitten 321
  2. Chap. XXVIII.—Mr. Montague at Home. And Mr. Jonas Chuzzlewit at Home 337
  3. Chap. XXIX.—In which some People are Precocious, others Professional, and others Mysterious: all in their several Ways 345
  4. Chap. XXX.—Proves that Changes may be rung in the best-regulated Families, and that Mr. Pecksniff was a special hand at a Triple-Bob-Major 353
  5. Chap. XXXI.—Mr. Pinch is discharged of a Duty which he never owed to Anybody; and Mr. Pecksniff discharges a Duty which he owes to Society 365
  6. Chap. XXXII.—Treats of Todgers's again; and of another Blighted Plant besides the Plants upon the Leads 380
  7. Chap. XXXIII.—Further Proceedings in Eden, and a Proceeding out of it. Martin makes a Discovery of some importance 385
  8. Chap. XXXIV.—In which the Travellers move Homeward, and Encounter some Distinguished Characters upon the Way 398
  9. Chap. XXXV.—Arriving in England, Martin witnesses a Ceremony, from which he derives the cheering Information that he has not been Forgotten in his Absence 411
  10. Chap. XXXVI.—Tom Pinch departs to seek his Fortune. What he finds at starting 417
  11. Chap. XXXVII.—Tom Pinch, going Astray, finds that he is not the only Person in that Predicament. He Retaliates upon a fallen Foe 433
  12. Chap. XXXVIII.—Secret Service 441
  13. Chap. XXXIX.—Containing some further Particulars of the Domestic Economy of the Pinches; with strange News from the City, narrowly concerning Tom 449
  14. Chap. XL.—The Pinches make a New Acquaintance, and have fresh occasion for Surprise and Wonder 462
  15. Chap. XLI.—Mr. Jonas and his Friend, arriving at a Pleasant Understanding, set forth upon an Enterprise 473
  16. Chap. XLII.—Continuation of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas and his Friend 481
  17. Chap. XLIII.—Has an Influence on the Fortunes of several People. Mr. Pecksniff is exhibited in the Plenitude of Power; and wields the same with Fortitude and Magnanimity 489
  1. Chap. XLIV.—Further Continuation of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas and his Friend 505
  2. Chap. XLV.—In which Tom Pinch and his Sister take a little Pleasure; but quite in a Domestic Way, and with no Ceremony about it 513
  3. Chap. XLVI.—In which Miss Pecksniff makes Love, Mr. Jonas makes Wrath, Mrs. Gamp makes Tea, and Mr. Chuffey makes Business 520
  4. Chap. XLVII.—Conclusion of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas and his Friend 537
  5. Chap. XLVIII.—Bears Tidings of Martin, and of Mark, as well as of a Third Person not quite unknown to the Reader. Exhibits Filial Piety in an Ugly Aspect; and casts a doubtful Ray of Light upon a very Dark Place 545
  6. Chap. XLIX.—In which Mrs. Harris, assisted by a Teapot, is the cause of a Division between Friends 558
  7. Chap. L.—Surprises Tom Pinch very much, and shows how certain Confidences passed between Him and his Sister 568
  8. Chap. LI.—Sheds New and Brighter Light upon the very Dark Place; and contains the Sequel of the Enterprise of Mr. Jonas and his Friend 577
  9. Chap. LII.—In which the Tables are Turned, completely Upside Down 593.
  10. Chap. LIII.—What John Westlock said to Tom Pinch's Sister; what Tom Pinch's Sister said to John Westlock; what Tom Pinch said to both of them; and how they all passed the Remainder of the Day 608
  11. Chap. LIV.—Gives the Author great Concern. For it is the Last in the Book 615

LIST OF PLATES.

  1. MEEKNESS OF MR. PECKSNIFF AND HIS CHARMING DAUGHTERS 14
  2. MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT SUSPECTS THE LANDLADY WITHOUT ANY REASON 24
  3. PLEASANT LITTLE FAMILY PARTY AT MR. PECKSNIFF'S 42
  4. PINCH STARTS HOMEWARD WITH THE NEW PUPIL 58
  5. MR. PINCH AND THE NEW PUPIL ON A SOCIAL OCCASION 79
  6. MARK BEGINS TO BE JOLLY UNDER CREDITABLE CIRCUMSTANCES 88
  7. MRS. TODGERS AND THE PECKSNIFFS CALL UPON MISS PINCH 163
  8. TRUTH PREVAILS, AND VIRTUE IS TRIUMPHANT 120
  9. MR. JONAS CHUZZLEWIT ENTERTAINS HIS COUSINS 138
  10. MR. PECKSNIFF RENOUNCES THE DECEIVER 160
  11. MARTIN MEETS AN ACQUAINTANCE AT THE HOUSE OF A MUTUAL RELATION 166
  12. MR. TAPLEY ACTS THIRD PARTY WITH GREAT DISCRETION 178
  13. MR. JEFFERSON BRICK PROPOSES AN APPROPRIATE SENTIMENT 199
  14. MR. TAPLEY SUCCEEDS IN FINDING A JOLLY SUBJECT FOR CONTEMPLATION 212
  15. THE DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP 232
  16. MR. PECKSNIFF ON HIS MISSION 235
  17. THE THRIVING CITY OF EDEN AS IT APPEARED ON PAPER 268
  18. THE THRIVING CITY OF EDEN AS IT APPEARED IN FACT 288
  19. BALM FOR THE WOUNDED ORPHAN 296
  20. MRS. GAMP HAS HER EYE ON THE FUTURE 320
  21. THE BOARD 327
  1. EASY SHAVING 346
  2. MR. MODDLE IS BOTH PARTICULAR AND PECULIAR IN HIS ATTENTIONS 384
  3. MR. PECKSNIFF DISCHARGES A DUTY WHICH HE OWES TO SOCIETY 387
  4. MR. TAPLEY IS RECOGNISED BY SOME FELLOW-CITIZENS OF EDEN 386
  5. MARTIN IS MUCH GRATIFIED BY AN IMPOSING CEREMONY 415
  6. MR. PINCH DEPARTS TO SEEK HIS FORTUNE 419
  7. MR. NADGETT BREATHES, AS USUAL, AN ATMOSPHERE OF MYSTERY 448
  8. MR. PINCH AND RUTH UNCONSCIOUS OF A VISITOR 452
  9. MYSTERIOUS INSTALLATION OF MR. PINCH 460
  10. MR. JONAS EXHIBITS HIS PRESENCE OF MIND 485
  11. MR. PECKSNIFF ANNOUNCES HIMSELF AS THE SHIELD OF VIRTUE 497
  12. MR. MODDLE IS LED TO THE CONTEMPLATION OF HIS DESTINY 521
  13. MRS. GAMP MAKES TEA 528
  14. MRS. GAMP PROPOSES A TOAST 563
  15. MR. PINCH IS AMAZED BY AN UNEXPECTED APPARITION 576
  16. WARM RECEPTION OF MR. PECKSNIFF BY HIS VENERABLE FRIEND 599
  17. THE NUPTIALS OF MISS PECKSNIFF RECEIVE A TEMPORARY CHECK 622

ERRATA.

Page 5, line 24 from top, strike out the parenthetical mark after "consequently."

Page 6, line 17 {{{1}}} for "buildings" read "building."

Page 7, line 28 {{{1}}} for "swagger," read "swaggerer."

Page 11, line 7 {{{1}}} for "of pocketing premiums," strike out "of."

Page 49, line 40 {{{1}}} for "she knew," read "he knew,"; for "she was right," read "he was right."

Page 108, line 27 {{{1}}} after "table" insert "beer."

Page 223, line 40 {{{1}}} for "appeared," read "appealed."

Page 297, line 41 {{{1}}} for "foundst," read "foundest;" for "wheezedst," read "wheezed;" bottom line, for "keptst," read "kept."

Page 567, line 9 {{{1}}} strike out the full stop after "his own," and before "I have been."

Page 576, line 20 {{{1}}} for "triumphed purpose," read "triumphant purpose."

This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.