Perjury Act, 1911

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Date of Commencement: 1 January 1912 (s. 19)
For corresponding provisions in Hong Kong law, see Part V of the Crimes Ordinance (Cap. 200), which is originally enacted in the Perjury Ordinance (Cap. 214, 1970 Ed.).

Perjury Act, 1911.

[1 & 2 Geo. 5. Ch. 6.]



A.D. 1911. 

ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS.


Section.
1. Perjury.
2. False statements on oath made otherwise than in a judicial proceeding.
3. False statements, &c. with reference to marriage.
4. False statements, &c. as to births or deaths.
5. False statutory declarations and other false statements without oath.
6. False declarations, &c. to obtain registration, &c. for carrying on a vocation.
7. Aiders, abettors, suborners, &c.
8. Venue.
9. Power to direct a prosecution for perjury.
10. Jurisdiction of quarter sessions.
11. Application of Vexatious Indictments Act, 1859.
12. Form of indictment.
13. Corroboration.
14. Proof of certain proceedings on which perjury is assigned.
15. Interpretation, &c.
16. Savings.
17. Repeals.
18. Extent.
19. Short title and commencement.
Schedule.

UK Parliamentary White Paper Cmd 1704 (page 1 crop).jpg

CHAPTER 6.

A.D. 1911.  An Act to consolidate and simplify the Law relating to Perjury and kindred offences.[29th June 1911.]

BE it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

Perjury.  1.—(1) If any person lawfully sworn as a witness or as an interpreter in a judicial proceeding wilfully makes a statement material in that proceeding, which he knows to be false or does not believe to be true, he shall be guilty of perjury, and shall, on conviction thereof on indictment, be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding seven years, or to imprisonment with or without hard labour for a term not exceeding two years, or to a fine or to both such penal servitude or imprisonment and fine.

(2) The expression “judicial proceeding” includes a proceeding before any court, tribunal, or person having by law power to hear, receive, and examine evidence on oath.

(3) Where a statement made for the purposes of a judicial proceeding is not made before the tribunal itself, but is made on oath before a person authorised by law to administer an oath to the person who makes the statement, and to record or authenticate the statement, it shall, for the purposes of this section, be treated as having been made in a judicial proceeding.

(4) A statement made by a person lawfully sworn in England for the purposes of a judicial proceeding—

(a) in another part of His Majesty’s dominions; or
(b) in a British tribunal lawfully constituted in any place by sea or land outside His Majesty’s dominions; or
(c) in a tribunal of any foreign state,

shall, for the purposes of this section, be treated as a statement made in a judicial proceeding in England.

(5) Where, for the purposes of a judicial proceeding in England, a person is lawfully sworn under the authority of an Act of Parliament—

(a) in any other part of His Majesty’s dominions; or
(b) before a British tribunal or a British officer in a foreign country, or within the jurisdiction of the Admiralty of England;

a statement made by such person so sworn as aforesaid (unless the Act of Parliament under which it was made otherwise specifically provides) shall be treated for the purposes of this section as having been made in the judicial proceeding in England for the purposes whereof it was made.

(6) The question whether a statement on which perjury is assigned was material is a question of, law to be determined by the court of trial.

False statements on oath made otherwise than in a judicial proceeding.  2. If any person—

(1) being required or authorised by law to make any statement on oath for any purpose, and being lawfully sworn (otherwise than in a judicial proceeding) wilfully makes a statement which is material for that purpose and which he knows to be false or does not believe to be true ; or
(2) wilfully uses any false affidavit for the purposes of the 41 & 42 Vict. c. 31. Bills of Sale Act, 1878, as amended by any subsequent enactment,

he shall be guilty of a misdemeanour, and, on conviction thereof on indictment, shall be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding seven years or to imprisonment, with or without hard labour, for a term not exceeding two years, or to a fine or to both such penal servitude or imprisonment and fine.

False statements, &c. with reference to marriage.  3.—(1) If any person—

(a) for the purpose of procuring a marriage, or a certificate or licence for marriage, knowingly and wilfully makes a false oath, or makes or signs a false declaration, notice or certificate required under any Act of Parliament for the time being in force relating to marriage; or
(b) knowingly and wilfully makes, or knowingly and wilfully causes to be made, for the purpose of being inserted in any register of marriage, a false statement as to any particular required by law to be known and registered relating to any marriage; or
(c) forbids the issue of any certificate or licence for marriage by falsely representing himself to be a person whose consent to the marriage is required by law knowing such representation to be false,

he shall be guilty of a misdemeanour, and, on conviction thereof on indictment, shall be liable to penal servitude for a term not exceeding seven years or to imprisonment, with or without hard labour, for a term not exceeding two years, or to a fine or to both such penal servitude or imprisonment and fine.

(2) No prosecution for knowingly and wilfully making a false declaration for the purpose of procuring any marriage out of the district in which the parties or one of. them dwell shall take place after the expiration of eighteen months. from the solemnization of the marriage to which the declaration refers.

False statements, &c. as to births or deaths.  4.—(1) If any person—

(a) wilfully makes any false answer to any question put to him by any registrar of births or deaths relating deaths. to the particulars required to be registered concerning any birth or death, or, wilfully gives to any such registrar any false information concerning any birth or death or the cause of any death; or
(b) wilfully makes any false certificate or declaration under or for the purposes of any Act relating to the registration of births or deaths, or, knowing any such certificate or declaration to be false, uses the same as true or gives or sends the same as true to any person; or
(c) wilfully makes, gives or uses any false statement or declaration as to a child born alive as having been still-born, or as to the body of a deceased person or a still-born child in any coffin, or falsely pretends that any child born alive was still-born; or
(d) makes any false statement with intent to have the same inserted in any register of births or deaths;

he shall be guilty of a misdemeanour and shall be liable—

(i) on conviction thereof on indictment, to penal servitude for a term not exceeding seven years, or to imprisonment, with or without hard labour, for a term not exceeding two years, or to a fine instead of either of the said punishments; and
(ii) on summary conviction thereof, to a penalty not exceeding ten pounds.

(2) A prosecution on indictment for an offence against this section shall not be commenced more than three years after the commission of the offence.

False statutory declarations and other statements without oath.  5. If any person knowingly and wilfully makes (otherwise than on oath) a statement false in a material particular, and the statement is made—

(a) in a statutory declaration; or
(b) in an abstract, account, balance sheet, book, certificate, declaration, entry, estimate, inventory, notice, report, return, or other document which he is authorised or required to make, attest, or verify, by any public general Act of Parliament for the time being in force; or
(c) in any oral declaration or oral answer which he is required to make by, under, or in pursuance of any public general Act of Parliament for the time being in force,

he shall be guilty of a misdemeanour and shall be liable on conviction thereof on indictment to imprisonment, with or without hard labour, for any term not exceeding two years, or to a fine or to both such imprisonment and fine.

False declarations, &c. to obtain registration, &c. for carrying on a vocation.  6. If any person—

(a) procures or attempts to procure himself to be registered on any register or roll kept under or in pursuance of any public general Act of Parliament for the time being in force of persons qualified by law to practise any vocation or calling; or
(b) procures or attempts to procure a certificate of the registration of any person on any such register or roll as aforesaid,

by wilfully making or producing or causing to be made or produced either verbally or in writing, any declaration, certificate, or representation which he knows to be false or fraudulent, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanour and shall be liable on conviction thereof on indictment to imprisonment for any term not exceeding twelve months, or to a fine, or to both such imprisonment and fine.

Aiders, abettors, suborners, &c.  7.—(1) Every person who aids, abets, counsels, procures, or suborns another person to commit an offence against this Act shall be liable to be proceeded against, indicted, tried and punished as if he were a principal offender.

(2) Every person who incites or attempts to procure or suborn another person to commit an offence against this Act shall be guilty of a misdemeanour, and, on conviction thereof on indictment, shall be liable to imprisonment, or to a fine, or to both such imprisonment and fine.

Venue.  8. Where an offence against this Act or any offence punishable as perjury or as subornation of perjury under any other Act of Parliament is committed in any place either on sea or land outside the United Kingdom, the offender may be proceeded against, indicted, tried, and punished in any county or place in England where he was apprehended or is in custody as if the offence had been committed in that county or place; and, for all purposes incidental to or consequential on the trial or punishment of the offence, it shall be deemed to have been committed in that county or place.

Power to direct a prosecution for perjury.  9.—(1) Where any of the following authorities, namely, a judge of, or person presiding in, a court of record, or a petty sessional court, or any justice of the peace sitting in special sessions, or any sheriff or his lawful deputy before whom a writ of inquiry or a writ of trial is executed, is of opinion that any person has, in the course of a proceeding before that authority, been guilty of perjury, the authority may order the prosecution of that person for such perjury, in case there shall appear to be reasonable cause for such prosecution, and may commit him, or admit him to bail, to take his trial at the proper court, and may require any person to enter into a recognizance to prosecute or give evidence against the person whose prosecution is so ordered, and may give the person so bound to prosecute a certificate of the making of the order for the prosecution, for which certificate no charge shall be made.

(2) An order made or a certificate given under this section shall not be given in evidence for the purpose or in the course of any trial of a prosecution resulting therefrom.

Jurisdiction of quarter sessions.  10. A court of quarter sessions shall not have jurisdiction to try an indictment for any offence against this Act, or for an offence which under any enactment for the time being in force is declared to be perjury or to be punishable as perjury, or as subornation of perjury.

Application of Vexatious Indictments Act, 1859.
22 & 23 Vict. c. 17.
 
11. The provisions of the Vexatious Indictments Act, 1859, and the Acts amending the same, shall apply in the case of any offence punishable under this Act, and in the case of any offence which under any other enactment for the time being in force, is declared to be perjury or subornation of perjury or is made punishable as perjury or as subornation of perjury, in like manner as if all the said offences were enumerated in section one of the said Vexatious Indictments Act, 1859: Provided that in that section a reference to this Act shall be substituted for the reference therein to the 14 & 15 Vict. c. 100. Criminal Procedure Act, 1851.

Form of indictment.  12.—(1) In an indictment—

(a) for making any false statement or false representation punishable under this Act; or
(b) for unlawfully, wilfully, falsely, fraudulently, deceitfully, maliciously, or corruptly taking, making, signing, or subscribing any oath, affirmation, solemn declaration, statutory declaration, affidavit, deposition, notice, certificate, or other writing,

it is sufficient to set forth the substance of the offence charged, and before which court or person (if any) the offence was committed without setting forth the proceedings or any part of the proceedings in the course of which the offence was committed, and without setting forth the authority of any court or person before whom the offence was committed.

(2) In an indictment for aiding, abetting, counselling, suborning, or procuring any other person to commit any offence herein-before in this section mentioned, or for conspiring with any other person, or with attempting to suborn or procure any other person, to commit any such offence, it is sufficient—

(a) where such offence has been committed, to allege that offence, and then to allege that the defendant procured the commission of that offence; and
(b) where such offence has not been committed, to set forth the substance of the offence charged against the defendant without setting forth any matter or thing which it is unnecessary to aver in the case of an indictment for a false statement or false representation punishable under this Act.

Corroboration.  13. A person shall not be liable to be convicted of any offence against this Act, or of any offence declared by any other Act to be perjury or subornation of perjury, or to be punishable as perjury or subornation of perjury solely upon the evidence of one witness as to the falsity of any statement alleged to be false.

Proof of certain proceedings on which perjury is assigned.  14. On a prosecution—

(a) for perjury alleged to have been committed on the trial of an indictment for felony or misdemeanour; or
(b) for procuring or suborning the commission of perjury on any such trial,

the fact of the former trial shall be sufficiently proved by the production of a certificate containing the substance and effect (omitting the formal parts) of the indictment and trial purporting to be signed by the clerk of the court, or other person having the custody of the records of the court where the indictment was tried, or by the deputy of that clerk or other person, without proof of the signature or official character of the clerk or person appearing to have signed the certificate.

Interpretation, &c.  15.—(1) For the purposes of this Act, the forms and ceremonies used in administering an oath are immaterial, if the court or person before whom the oath is taken has power to administer an oath for the purpose of verifying the statement in question, and if the oath has been administered in a form and with ceremonies which the person taking the oath has accepted without objection, or has declared to be binding on him.

(2) In this Act—

The expression “oath” in the case of persons for the time being allowed by law to affirm or declare instead of swearing, includes “affirmation” and “declaration,” and the expression “swear” in the like case includes “affirm” and “declare”; and

The expression “statutory declaration” means a declaration made by virtue of the 5 & 6 Will. 4. c. 62. Statutory Declarations Act, 1835, or of any Act, Order in Council, rule or regulation applying or extending the provisions thereof ; and

The expression “indictment” includes “criminal information.”

Savings.  16.—(1) Where the making of a false statement is not only an offence under this Act, but also by virtue of some other Act is a corrupt practice or subjects the offender to any forfeiture or disqualification or to any penalty other than penal servitude, or imprisonment, or fine, the liability of the offender under this Act shall be in addition to and not in substitution for his liability under such other Act.

(2) Nothing in this Act shall apply to a statement made without oath by a child under the provisions of the 4 Edw. 7. c. 15.
8 Edw. 7. c. 67.
 
Prevention of Cruelty to Children Act, 1904, and the Children Act, 1908.

(3) Where the making of a false statement is by any other Act, whether passed before or after the commencement of this Act, made punishable on summary conviction, proceedings may be taken either under such other Act or under this Act:

Provided that where such an offence is by any Act passed before the commencement of this Act, as originally enacted, made punishable only on summary conviction, it shall remain only so punishable.

Repeals.  17. The enactments specified in the schedule to this Act are hereby repealed, so far as they apply to England, to the extent specified in the third column of that schedule.

Extent.  18. This Act shall not extend to Scotland or Ireland.

Short title and commencement.  19. This Act may be cited as the Perjury Act, 1911, and shall come into operation on the first day of January nineteen and hundred and twelve.

SCHEDULE.



Section 17. 

Enactments Repealed.

Session and Chapter. Title or Short Title. Extent of Repeal.
32 Hen. 8. c. 9. Agenst maintenaunce and embracery byeng of titles, &c. In section three, the words “or suborne any witnes by tres, rewardis, promises, or by any other sinistre labour or meanes,” and the words “or to the procurement or occasion of any manner of pjury by false verdict or otherwise.”
5 Eliz. c. 9. An Act for the Punyshement of suche persones as shall procure or comit any wyllful Perjurye. The whole Act.
1 Ann. stat. 2. c. 9. An Act for punishing of Accessories to feloneys and Receivers of stolen Goods, and to prevent the wilful burning and destroying of Ships. Section three from “and if convicted” to the end of the section.
12 Geo. 1. c. 29. The Frivolous Arrests Act, 1725. In section four, the words “or of wilful and corrupt perjury or of subornation of perjury.”
2 Geo. 2. c. 25. The Perjury Act, 1728 The whole Act.
24 Geo. 3. sess. 2. c. 25. The East India Company Act, 1781. Section seventy-five from “and if any such witness” to the end of the section.
42 Geo. 3. c. 85. The Criminal Jurisdiction Act, 1802. Section five.
42 Geo. 3. c. 116. The Land Tax Redemption Act, 1802. Section one hundred and ninety-three.
48 Geo. 3. c. 149. The Probate and Legacy Duties Act, 1808. Section thirty-seven from “and if any person or persons making any such affidavit” to the end of the section.
54 Geo. 3. c. 159. The Harbours Act, 1814. Section twenty-five.
56 Geo. 3. c. 46. The Civil List Audit Act, 1816. Section eleven.
1 & 2 Geo. 4. c. 121. The Commissariat Accounts Act, 1821. Section twenty-eight.
3 Geo. 4. c. 114. The Hard Labour Act, 1822. In section one, the words “wilful and corrupt perjury or of subornation of perjury.”
7 Geo. 4. c. 16. The Chelsea and Kilmainham Hospitals Act 1826. Section twenty-eight.
7 Geo. 4. c. 46. The Country Bankers Act, 1826. Section eighteen from “and if any such secretary” to the end of the section.
7 & 8 Geo. 4. c. 53. The Excise Management Act, 1827. Section thirty-one.
10 Geo. 4. c. 24. The Government Annuities Act, 1829. Section forty-four.
10 Geo. 4. c. 50. The Crown Lands Act, 1829. Section eighty-three.
1 Will. 4. c. 22. The Evidence on Commission Act, 1831. Section seven from “and if upon such oath or affirmation” to the end of the section.
2 & 3 Will. 4. c. 53. The Army Prize Money Act, 1832. Section forty-five.

In section forty-six, the words “the offence of taking a false oath or suborning any person so to do or.”

Section forty-nine from “or shall knowingly take a false oath . . .” to “other military service.”

3 & 4 Will. 4. c. 41. The Judicial Committee Act, 1833. Section nine from “and every such witness” to the end of the section.
3 & 4 Will. 4. c. 49. The Quakers and Moravians Act, 1833. Section one from “and if any such person” to “notwithstanding.”
5 & 6 Will. 4. c. 62. The Statutory Declarations Act, 1835. Section five.

Section twelve from “and all and every” to the end of the section.

Section eighteen from “and if any declaration” to the end of the section.

Section twenty-one.

6 & 7 Will. 4. c. 71. The Tithe Act, 1836 Section ninety-three from the beginning of the section to “penalties of perjury, and”.
6 & 7 Will. 4. c. 86. The Births and Deaths Registration Act, 1836. Section forty-one.
1 & 2 Vict. c. 77. The Quakers and Moravians Act, 1838. Section one from “and if any such person” to “are or shall be subject.”
1 & 2 Vict. c. 105. The Oaths Act, 1838 In section one, the word “either” and the words “or a witness or a deponent” and from “and every such person” to the end of the section.
2 & 3 Vict. c. 71. The Metropolitan Police Courts Act, 1839. Section twenty-three.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 18. The Tobacco Act, 1840 Section ten from “and if such declaration” to the end of the section.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 72. The Marriage Act, 1840 Section four.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 86. The Church Discipline Act, 1840. Section eighteen from “and every such witness” to the end of the section.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 97. The Railway Regulation Act, 1840. Section four.
5 & 6 Vict. c. 29. The Pentonville Prison Act, 1842. Section twenty-seven.
5 & 6 Vict. c. 35. The Income Tax Act, 1842. Section one hundred and eighty.
5 & 6 Vict. c. 38. The Quarter Sessions Act, 1842. In section one, the following words:—
“6. Perjury and subornation of perjury;
7 Making or suborning any other person to make a false oath, affirmation, or declaration, " punishable as perjury or as a " misdemeanour;”
6 & 7 Vict. c. 18. The Parliamentary Voters Registration Act, 1843. In section forty-one, the words “and every person taking any oath or affirmation under this Act who shall wilfully swear or affirm falsely shall be guilty of perjury.”
6 & 7 Vict. c. 18.—cont. The Parliamentary Voters Registration Act, 1843. In section eighty-one, the words “and if any person shall wilfully make a false answer to either of the questions aforesaid he shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall and may be indicted and punished accordingly.”
8 & 9 Vict. c. 18. The Lands Clauses Consolidation Act, 1845. Section one hundred and forty-nine.
8 & 9 Vict. c. 20. The Railways Clauses Consolidation Act, 1845. Section one hundred and sixty.
8 & 9 Vict. c. 118. The Inclosure Act, 1845. In section one hundred and sixty-four, the words “shall wilfully give false evidence, or shall make or subscribe a false declaration for the purposes of this Act, or”.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 14. The Markets and Fairs Clauses Act, 1847. Section fifty-seven.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 15. The Gas Works Clauses Act, 1847. Section forty-four.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 16. The Commissioners Clauses Act, 1847. Sections thirteen and one hundred and eight.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 17. The Waterworks Clauses Act, 1847. Section eighty-nine.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 27. The Harbours, Docks, and Piers Clauses Act, 1847. Section ninety-six.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 34. The Towns Improvement Clauses Act, 1847. Section two hundred and thirteen.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 65. The Cemeteries Clauses Act, 1847. Section sixty-five
10 & 11 Vict. c. 69. The House of Commons Costs Taxation Act, 1847. Section five from “and any person” to the end of the section.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 89. The Town Police Clauses Act, 1847. Section seventy-six.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 109. The Poor Law Board Act, 1847. Section twenty-six from the beginning of the section to “penalties of perjury; and”.
11 & 12 Vict. c. 46. The Criminal Procedure Act, 1848. Section four from “both with regard” to “and otherwise.”
12 & 13 Vic c. 45. The Quarter Sessions Act, 1849. Section ten from from “both with regard” to “and otherwise.”
12 &13 Vict c. 78. The House of Lords Costs Taxation Act, 1849. Section five from “and any person” to the end of the section.
14 & 15 Vict c. 100. The Criminal Procedure Act, 1851. In section one, the words “both with respect to the liability of witnesses to be prosecuted for perjury and otherwise.”

Sections nineteen, twenty, twenty-one, and twenty-two.

15 & 16 Vict c. 56. The Pharmacy Act, 1852. Section sixteen from “shall wilfully” to “under this Act or”.
15 & 16 Vict c. 57. The Election Commissioners Act, 1852. Section thirteen.
16 & 17 Vict. c. 45. The Government Annuities Act, 1853. Section thirty-two.
16 & 17 Vict. c. 137. The Charitable Trusts Act, 1853. Section thirteen.
19 & 20 Vict. c. 54. The Grand Juries Act, 1856. In section one, the words “and every person taking any oath or affirmation in support of any bill of indictment who shall wilfully swear or affirm falsely shall be deemed guilty of perjury.”
19 & 20 Vict. c. 113. The Foreign Tribunals Evidence Act, 1856. Section three from “and if upon such oath . . .” to the end of the section.
19 & 20 Vict. c. 119. The Marriage and Registration Act, 1856. Section two from “and every person who shall knowingly” to the end of the section; and section eighteen.
20 & 21 Vict. c. 85. The Matrimonial Causes Act, 1857. Section fifty.
21 & 22 Vict. c. 78. The Parliamentary Witnesses Act, 1858. Section three.
21 & 22 Vict. c. 90. The Medical Act, 1858 Section thirty-nine.
22 Vict. c. 20. The Evidence by Commission Act, 1859. Section two.
22 & 23 Vict. c. 17. The Vexatious Indictments Act, 1859. In section one, the words “perjury, subornation of perjury.”
24 & 25 Vict. c. 10. The Admiralty Court Act, 1861. Section twenty-six from “and any person” to the end of the section.
24 & 25 Vict. c. 53. The University Elections Act, 1861. In section five, the words “falsely making any such declaration as aforesaid, or such declaration as is contained in the Schedule, or,” and the words “and any person wilfully making a false answer to any question put to him by the returning or other officer as herein-before provided”.
25 & 26 Vict. c. 53. The Land Registry Act, 1862. In section one hundred and sixty-four, the words “shall wilfully give false evidence, or shall make or subscribe a false declaration for the purposes of this Act, or”.
25 & 26 Vict. c. 67. The Declaration of Title Act, 1862. In section forty-four, the words “make or assist or join in or be privy to the making of any material false statement or representation or”.
25 & 26 Vict. c. 103. The Union Assessment Committee Act, 1862. In section forty, the words “or who upon any examination before any such committee wilfully gives false evidence.”
26 & 27 Vict. c. 87. The Trustee Savings Banks Act, 1863. Section forty-nine from “and if upon such oath"” to the end of the section.
27 & 28 Vict. c. 25. The Naval Prize Act, 1864. Section fifty.
27 & 28 Vict. c. 114. The Improvement of Land Act, 1864. Section five.
28 & 29 Vict. c. 36. The County Voters Registration Act, 1865. In section eleven, the words “and any person knowingly and wilfully making any false statement of fact in such declaration.”
29 & 30 Vict. c. 62. The Crown Lands Act, 1866. Section twenty-nine.
29 & 30 Vict. c. 108. The Railway Companies Securities Act, 1866. In section seventeen, the words “on conviction thereof on indictment to fine or imprisonment, or,” so far as relates to indictable offences under section sixteen of the same Act.
29 & 30 Vict. c. 109. The Naval Discipline Act, 1866. Section sixty-seven from “and where any such offence” to the end of the section.
30 & 31 Vict. c. 84. The Vaccination Act, 1867. Section thirty from “and every person” to the end of the section.
30 & 31 Vict. c. 136. The Parliamentary Costs Act, 1867. Section two.
31 & 32 Vict. c. 24. The Capital Punishment Amendment Act, 1868. Section nine.
31 & 32 Vict. c. 45. The Sea Fisheries Act, 1868. Section thirty-two from “and any person who wilfully” to “guilty of perjury.”
31 & 32 Vict. c. 71. The County Courts Admiralty Jurisdiction Act, 1868. Section nineteen from “and any person” to the end of the section.
31 & 32 Vict. c. 119. The Regulation of Railways Act, 1868. In section five, the words “on conviction thereof on indictment to fine and imprisonment, or”.

In section eight, the words “Any person who, when so examined on oath, makes any false statement, knowing the same to be false, shall be guilty of perjury.”

31 & 32 Vict. c. 121. The Pharmacy Act, 1868. Section fourteen from “and any person who shall” to “assisting him therein.”
31 & 32 Vict. c. 125. The Parliamentary Elections Act, 1868. In section thirty-one, the words “and shall be subject to the same penalties for perjury.”
32 & 33 Vict. c. 111. The Bishops Resignation Act, 1869. In section six, the words “and any person, when examined by such persons, who wilfully makes a false statement, whether on oath or not, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.”
33 & 34 Vict. c. 102. The Naturalization Oath Act, 1870. Section two.
34 & 35 Vict c. 36. The Pensions Commutation Act, 1871. In section nine, the words “shall be deemed to be guilty of a misdemeanour and” and the words “and to be imprisoned for any term not exceeding two years with or without hard labour.”
34 & 35 Vict. c. 78. The Regulation of Railways Act, 1871. In section ten, the words “on conviction thereof on indictment to fine and imprisonment, or”.
34 & 35 Vict. c. 83. The Parliamentary Witnesses Oaths Act, 1871. In section one, the words “Any person examined as aforesaid who wilfully gives false evidence shall be liable to the penalties of perjury.”
35 & 36 Vict. c. 8. The Deans and Canons Resignation Act, 1872. Section four from “and any person” to “guilty of a misdemeanour.”
35 & 36 Vict. c. 93. The Pawnbrokers Act, 1872. Section twenty-nine from “If any person makes a declaration” . . . to the end of the section.
36 & 37 Vict. c. 60. The Extradition Act, 1873. Section five from “Every person who” to “perjury.”
37 & 38 Vict. c. 88. The Births and Deaths Registration Act, 1874. In section forty, subsection one; and, in subsection two, the words “wilfully makes any false certificate or declaration under or for the purposes of this Act or”; and subsections three and four.
38 & 39 Vict. c. 55. The Public Health Act, 1875. Section two hundred and sixty-three.
38 & 39 Vict. c. 87. The Land Transfer Act, 1875. Section one hundred and one.
38 & 39 Vict. c. 89. The Public Works Loans Act, 1875. Section forty-four from “when examined” to “false evidence or”.
39 & 40 Vict. c. 36. The Customs Consolidation Act, 1876. Section thirty-six from “and any witness” to “penalties thereof.”
41 & 42 Vict. c. 26. The Parliamentary and Municipal Registration Act, 1878. In section twenty-five, the words “or knowingly and wilfully makes any false statement of fact in any declaration of the nature aforesaid.”
41 & 42 Vict. c. 31. The Bills of Sale Act 1878. Section seventeen from “Whoever” to the end of the section.
41 & 42 Vict. c. 33. The Dentists Act, 1878 Section thirty five.
43 & 44 Vict. c. 13. The Births and Deaths Registration (Ireland) Act, 1880. In section thirty, subsection one; and, in subsection two, the words “wilfully makes any false certificate or declaration under or for the purposes of this Act, or” and subsections three and four.
43 & 44 Vict. c. 19. The Taxes Management Act, 1880. In section sixty-three, the words “If any person wilfully and corruptly makes a false statement in any such oath of service he shall be guilty of misdemeanor, and shall be liable to imprisonment for six months with or without a fine not exceeding fifty pounds” (being subsection four of the said section).
43 & 44 Vict. c. 41. The Burials Act, 1880 In section ten, the words “any person who shall wilfully make any false statement in such certificate and”.
44 & 45 Vict. c. 62. The Veterinary Surgeons Act, 1881. Section eleven.
45 & 46 Vict. c. 37. The Corn Returns Act, 1882. In section twelve, the words “false or”.
45 & 46 Vict. c. 50. The Municipal Corporations Act, 1882. In section fifty-nine, the words “If any person wilfully makes a false answer thereto he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor” (being subsection three of the said section).

In section ninety-four, the words “and shall be liable to the same penalties for perjury.”

45 & 46 Vict. c. 51. The Government Annuities Act, 1882. Section eleven from “If a person” . . . to “twelve months” (being subsection three of the said section).
46 & 47 Vict. c. 51. The Corrupt and Illegal Practices Prevention Act, 1883. In section thirty-three, subsection seven, the words “and on conviction thereof on indictment shall be liable to the punishment for wilful and corrupt perjury.”
47 & 48 Vict c. 54. The Yorkshire Registries Act, 1884. Section forty-seven.
47 & 48 Vict c. 70. The Municipal Elections (Corrupt and Illegal Practices) Act, 1884. In section twenty-one, subsection five, the words “and on conviction thereof on indictment shall be liable to the punishment for wilful and corrupt perjury.”
48 & 49 Vict, c. 54. The Pluralities Act Amendment Act, 1885. Section seven from “and every witness” to the end of the section.
50 & 51 Vict. c. 28. The Merchandise Marks Act, 1887. In section eight, subsection (3) the words “on conviction on indictment to the penalties of perjury and”.
50 & 51 Vict. c. 47. The Trustee Savings Banks Act, 1887. In section two, the words “If any person on examination on oath or affirmation under this section wilfully gives false evidence, he shall be liable to the penalties for perjury” (being subsection five of the said section).
51 & 52 Vict. c. 46. The Oaths Act, 1888. Section one from “and if any person” to the end of the section.
52 & 53 Vict. c. 10. The Commissioners of Oaths Act, 1889. Section seven.
52 & 53 Vict. c. 49. The Arbitration Act, 1889. Section twenty-two.
54 & 55 Vict. c. 70. The Markets and Pairs (Weighing of Cattle) Act, 1891. In section three, the words “false or”.
55 & 56 Vict. c. 23. The Foreign Marriage Act, 1892. Section fifteen.
57 & 58 Vict. c. 46. The Copyhold Act, 1894. In section fifty-four, the words “If any person wilfully gives false evidence in any proceeding under this Act he shall be guilty of perjury” (being subsection five of the said section).
59 & 60 Vict. c. 25. The Friendly Societies Act, 1896. In section eighty-seven, the words “false or”.
61 & 62 Vict. c. 48. The Benefices Act, 1898. Section four from “For the declaration” . . . to “perjury” (being subsection four of the said section).
62 & 63 Vict. c. 23. The Anchors and Chain Cables Act, 1899. In section thirteen, the words “or (iii) make any false statement in a certificate of proof.”
2 Edw. 7. c. 8. The Cremation Act, 1902. In section eight, subsection two, the words “declaration or”.
2 Edw. 7. c. 17. The Midwives Act, 1902. Section eleven.
6 Edw. 7. c. 40. The Marriage with Foreigners Act, 1906. Section one from “If a person knowingly . . .” to “country or place” (being subsection two of the said section).
7 Edw. 7. c. 24. The Limited Partnerships Act, 1907. Section twelve.
8 Edw. 7. c. 28. The Agricultural Holdings Act, 1908. Section thirteen from “Any person who” to “punished accordingly” (being subsection five of the said section).
8 Edw. 7. c. 53. The Law of Distress Amendment Act, 1908. Section one from “and if any under tenant” to the end of the section.
8 Edw. 7. c. 69. The Companies (Consolidation) Act, 1908. Section two hundred and eighteen; and, in section two hundred and eighty-one, the words “on conviction on indictment to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, with or without hard labour, and”, and the words “in either case.”
9 Edw. 7. c. 49. The Assurance Companies Act, 1909. In section twenty-four, the words “on conviction on indictment to fine and imprisonment, or”.

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