1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Tattersall's

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TATTERSALL'S, the London horse auction mart, founded in 1766 by Richard Tattersall (1724-1795), who had been stud groom to the second duke of Kingston. The first premises occupied were near Hyde Park Corner, in what was then the outskirts of London. Two " Subscription rooms " were re- served for members of the Jockey Club, and they became the rendezvous for sporting and betting men. Among the famous dispersal sales conducted hy " Old Tatt" were those of the duke of Kingston's stud in 1774 and of the stud of the Prince of Wales (afterwards George IV.) in 1786. The prince often visited Richard Tattersall, and was joint proprietor with him of the Morning Post for several years. He was succeeded by his son, Edmund Tattersall (1758-1810), who extended the business of the firm to France. The third of the dynasty, Richard Tattersall (1785-1859), the eldest of Edmund's three sons, became head of the firm at his father's death. He had his grandfather's ability and tact, and was the intimate of the best sporting men of his time. Another Richard Tattersall (1812-1870), son of the last, then took command of the busi- ness. His great-grandfather's 99-year lease having expired, he • moved the business to Knightsbridge. Richard was followed by his cousin, Edmund Tattersall (1816-1898), and he by his eldest son, Edmund Somerville Tattersall (b. 1863).

A son of the second Richard Tattersall, George Tattersall (1817-1849), was a well-known sporting artist. In 1836 he compiled a guide to The Lakes of England illustrated with forty- three charming line drawings, and he showed skill as an architect by building the Tattersall stud stables at Willesden. His experience in this and similar undertakings led him to publish Sporting Architecture (1841). In the same year, under the pseudonym " Wildrake," he published Cracks of the Day, describing and illustrating sixty-five race-horses. He also con- tributed illustrations to the Hunting Reminiscences of Nimrod (Charles J. Apperley), the Book of Sports (1843), and the New Sporting Almanack.