A Treatise upon the Small-Pox

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A Treatise upon the Small-Pox  (1723) 
by Richard Blackmore

A medical work upon small-pox, published late in the life of its author, Sir Richard Blackmore. In its second part, it argues against the process of small-pox inoculation (i. e., vaccination), which had been introduced formally into the United States two years prior, making it one of the earliest works of scientific literature in the history of anti-vaccination movements.

A

TREATISE

UPON THE

SMALL-POX,

In Two PARTS.

CONTAINING,

I. An Account of the Nature and several Kinds of that Disease, with the proper Methods of Cure.

II. A Dissertation upon the modern Practice of Inoculation.


By Sir RICHARD BLACKMORE, Knt.


A Treatise upon the Small-Pox-Image1.jpg


LONDON:

Printed for John Clark, at the Bible and Crown in the Poultry, near Cheapside. M. d. cc. xxiii.(Price 1s. 6d.)


Chapters (not listed in original)

The Preface
I. An Account of the Nature and several Kinds of that Disease, with the proper Methods of Cure.
Part 1, Section I - Of the Nature of the Small-Pox.
Part 1, Section II - Of the several Sorts or Species of the Small-Pox.
Part 1, Section III - Of the Method of Cure.
II. A Dissertation upon the modern Practice of Inoculation.
Part 2 - The Introduction
Part 2 - An Inquiry
Contents
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This work was published before January 1, 1927, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.