Author:John Davies (1625-1693)

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
For authors with similar names, see Author:John Davies.
John Davies
(1625–1693)
English translator

Works[edit]

  • Treatise against the Principles of Descartes,’ 1654.
  • Sorel's ‘The Extravagant Shepherd, an Anti-Romance,’ 1654.
  • ‘Letters of M. Voiture,’ 1655.
  • ‘Apocalypsis, or a Discovery of some Notorious Heretics,’ illustrated, 1655.
  • G. Naudeus's ‘The History of Magic,’ 1656.
  • ‘Les Provinciales, or the Mysteries of Jesuitism,’1656.
  • Scuderi's ‘Clelia,’ 1656.
  • ‘Novels by Scarron;’ three were published separately in 1657, four others in 1662, the whole collected 1667.
  • ‘A Further Discovery of the Mystery of Jesuitism,’ 1659.
  • ‘Journal of Proceedings between Jansenists and Jesuits,’ 1659.
  • ‘Hymen's Præludia,’ concluding parts of ‘Cleopatra,’ a romance in 3 vols. 1658, 1659, 1660.
  • Some of the latter volumes of the Philosophical Conferences of the Virtuosi in France, 1661.
  • Blondell's ‘Treatise of the Sibyls,’ 1661.
  • E. de Aranda's ‘History of Algiers and Slavery there,’ 1662.
  • ‘Olearius's Travels (1633–1650) of an Ambassador of the Duke of Holstein in Russia, Persia, and India,’ two parts, 1662, collected 1669. (transcription project)
  • Solorzano's ‘La Picara, or the Triumphs of Female Subtilty,’ 1664.
  • De la Chambre's Art how to Know Men,’ 1665.
  • ‘The History of Caribby Islands,’ illustrated, 1666.
  • Florus's ‘Roman History,’ 1667.
  • ‘Murtadi's Egyptian History, from the French of Vallier,’ 1667.
  • ‘The Unexpected Choice,’ a novel by Scarron, 1670.
  • ‘Observations on Homer and Virgil,’ 1670, 1672.
  • ‘Life and Philosophy of Epictetus, with Cebes' Emblem of Humane Life,’ 1670.
  • ‘Epictetus Junior, or Maxims of Modern Morality,’ 1670, said to be an original compilation.
  • ‘Account of the Ceremonies of the Vacant See,’ 1671.
  • ‘History of Henry, surnamed the Great, King of France,’ 1672.
  • ‘Prudential Reflections, &c. in Three Centuries,’ 1674.
  • ‘Political and Military Observations,’ 1677.
  • Sanctorius's ‘Mediana Statica, or Rules of Health,’ 1677.
  • Tavernier's ‘History of the Seraglio,’ 1677.
  • ‘The History of Appian of Alexandria,’ 1679.
  • ‘Instructions for History, with a character of the most considerable historians,’ 1680.
  • Blondell's ‘Pindar and Horace compared,’ 1680.
  • Three Spanish novels, viz. (a) ‘All Covet, All Lose,’ (b) ‘The Knight of the Marigold,’ (c) ‘The Trepanner Trepann'd.’ Letters by Davies are prefixed to John Hall's ‘Paradoxes,’ 1653; Hobbes's ‘Letter of Liberty,’ 1654; ‘The Right Hand of Christian Love,’ 1655; ‘Astræa, or the Grove of Beatitude,’ illustrated, 1665; ‘Hierocles on the Golden Verses of Pythagoras,’ translated by Davies's friend John Hall, and prefaced by Davies with an account of Hall and his works, 1657; and ‘The Antient Rites and Monuments of the Church of Durham,’ 1672 (cf. Hearne, Coll., ed. Doble, i. 95). Davies seems to have edited ‘Enchiridion,’ 1686, by his friend Henry Turberville.
  • "I know my soul hath power to know all things"

Works about Davies[edit]


Works by this author published before January 1, 1924 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago. Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted. Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas.