Author:Samuel Walter Miller

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Samuel Walter Miller
(1864–1949)
American linguist, classics scholar and archaeologist

Works[edit]

  • Mennipus in Lucian (1884) (external scan)
  • The Theater of Thoricus (papers of the American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Vol. IV., 1888). (external scan)
  • Latin Prose Composition for College Use, Leach, Shewell and Sanborn, Boston and New York, (1890, 1891) (external scans (multiple parts): 1, 2)
  • Key to Latin Prose Composition, 1894.
  • Pausanias and His Guidebook, 1894. (external scan)
  • History of the Akropolis of Athens, 1894. Published in the American Journal of Archeology
  • "The Old and the New," Commencement address, Stanford University, 1898. (external scan)
  • (tr.) with Miller De Bestiis Marinis (The Beasts of the Sea) by Steller, In an appendix to The Fur Seals and Fur-Seal Islands of the North Pacific Ocean, edited by David Starr Jordan, Part 3 (Washington, 1899), pp. 179–218. (external scan) (external scan)
  • (tr.) De Officiis (On Duties) by Cicero. Harvard University Press, 1913, (external scan)
  • (tr.) Cyropaedia, by Xenophon Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1914, (external scans (multiple parts): 1, 2)
  • "Dulce et Decorum est pro Patria Mori," Commencement address, University of Missouri, 1919.
  • Daedalus and Thespis, The Contribution of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece, Volume I: Architecture and Topography: The Macmillan Co., New York, 1929.
  • The Iliad of Homer: A Line for Line Translation in Dactylic Hexameters. With William Benjamin Smith. Macmillan, New York, 1944.


Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1, 1925.


The author died in 1949, so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or less. Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.