Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/Celenderis

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A titular see of Asia Minor.

Celenderis was a port and fortress in Isauria, founded by the Phoenicians or, according to legend, by Sandacos, son of Astynoös and grandson of Phaethon. It figures in Parthey's "Notitiae episcopatuum" as late as the twelfth or thirteenth century, as a suffragan of Seleuceia. Lequien (II, 1015) gives four titulars: Musonius in 381, Julianus, or Julius, in 451 and 458, Peter at the Trullan Council in 692, and Eustathius at Nicaea in 787. Another, whose name is unknown, was amongst the friends of Photius in 878. We must add two names: Asterius, a correspondent of Severus in 508 and 511, and Pelagius in 518 (E. W. Brooks, "The Sixth Book of the Select Letters of Severus", II, 4; "Vita Severi", 28; "Chronique de Michel le Syrien", ed. Chabot, 267). Celenderis is to-day a little village, commonly called Kilindria, the chief centre of the caza of Gulnar in the vilayet of Adana, with 210 inhabitants, mostly Greeks. It has a pretty roadstead, but of difficult approach. There are Roman and medieval ruins, among them those of an aqueduct, a castle, beautiful sarcophagi, etc.

S. Pétridès.