Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/Charles-Antoine Coysevox

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A distinguished French sculptor, b. at Lyons, 29 Sept., 1640; d. at Paris, 10 Oct., 1720; he belonged to a family originally from Spain. At the age of seventeen he executed a much admired Madonna. In 1671 he was employed by Louis XIV on various sculptures at Versailles and at Marly. He was elected a member of the Academy in 1676, and had among his pupils his two nephews, Nicolas and Guillaume Coustou. Coysevox made two bronze statues of Louis XIV, the "Charlemagne" at Saint-Louis des Invalides, and other famous works, but his most famous is probably "La Renommée" at the entrance of the Tuileries - two winged horses bearing Mercury and Fame. Napoleon is said to have delighted in the sculptor's fancy that the horse of Mercury should have a bridle, but not that of Fame. Coysevox also produced some fine sepulchral monuments for the churches of Paris. We owe him a special debt for his contemporary portraits.

LÜBKE, History of Sculpture, tr. BENNETT (London, 1878); DILKE, French Architects and Sculptors of the XVIII Century (London, 1900).

M. L. Handley.