Civil Rights Act of 1964

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88TH UNITED STATES CONGRESS
2ND SESSION

An Act
To enforce the constitutional right to vote, to confer jurisdiction upon the district courts of the United States to provide injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations, to authorize the Attorney General to institute suits to protect constitutional rights in public facilities and public education, to extend the Commission on Civil Rights, to prevent discrimination in federally assisted programs, to establish a Commission on Equal Employment Opportunity, and for other purposes.


Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
That this Act may be cited as the "Civil Rights Act of 1964".
• Title I – VOTING RIGHTS
• Title II – INJUNCTIVE RELIEF AGAINST DISCRIMINATION IN PLACES OF PUBLIC ACCOMMODATION
• Title III – DESEGREGATION OF PUBLIC FACILITIES
First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
• Title IV – DESEGREGATION OF PUBLIC EDUCATION
• Title V – COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS
• Title VI – NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS
• Title VII – EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
• Title VIII – REGISTRATION AND VOTING STATISTICS
• Title IX – INTERVENTION AND PROCEDURE AFTER REMOVAL IN CIVIL RIGHTS CASES
• Title X – ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE
• Title XI – MISCELLANEOUS


Approved July 2, 1964.


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