Constitution Sixteenth Amendment Act of 2009

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Constitution Sixteenth Amendment Act of 2009
enacted by the Parliament of South Africa
The Constitution Sixteenth Amendment Act of 2009 is an act of the Parliament of South Africa amending the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. A presidential proclamation brought it into force on 3 April 2009. It altered the provincial boundaries to transfer Merafong City Local Municipality (including Khutsong) from North West to Gauteng. Merafong City had originally been included in North West by the Constitution Twelfth Amendment Act of 2005, but the change was met with strong opposition in Khutsong, and it was eventually decided by the government to return the area to Gauteng.

See Notice 1490 of 2008 for the maps referred to in the sections inserted by this Act.


(English text signed by the President.)
(Assented to 25 March 2009.)



Act


To amend the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, in order to re-determine the geographical areas of the provinces of Gauteng and North West; and to provide for matters connected therewith.


Parliament of the Republic of South Africa enacts as follows:—


Amendment of Schedule 1A to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, as inserted by section 4 of the Constitution Twelfth Amendment Act of 2005 and amended by section 1 of the Constitution Thirteenth Amendment Act of 2007

1. Schedule 1A to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, is hereby amended by—

(a) the substitution, under the heading “The Province of Gauteng”, for the reference to “Map No. 4 of Schedule 1 to Notice 1998 of 2005” of a reference to “Map No. 4 in Notice 1490 of 2008”; and

(b) the substitution, under the heading “The Province of North West”, for the reference to “Map No. 5 of Schedule 1 to Notice 1998 of 2005” of a reference to “Map No. 5 in Notice 1490 of 2008”.


Short title and commencement

2. This Act is called the Constitution Sixteenth Amendment Act of 2009, and comes into operation on a date determined by the President by proclamation in the Gazette.

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