Dave Porter in the South Seas

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Dave Porter in the South Seas.djvu

Dave Porter Series



DAVE PORTER IN THE SOUTH SEAS


OR


THE STRANGE CRUISE OF THE STORMY PETREL


BY


EDWARD STRATEMEYER


Author of "Under Togo for Japan," "Under the Mikado's
Flag
," "At the Fall of Port Arthur," "Old Glory
Series
," "Pan-American Series," "Colonial
Series
," "American Boys' Biographical
Series," etc.


ILLUSTRATED BY I. B. HAZELTON


BOSTON
LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO.

Published, August, 1906


Copyright, 1906, by Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Company


All rights reserved


Dave Porter in the South Seas


Norwood Press
Berwick and Smith Co.
Norwood, Mass.
U. S. A.

Dave Porter South Seas p008.jpg

The canoe was sent closer and finally beached.—Page 258.


PREFACE


"Dave Porter in the South Seas" is a complete story in itself, but forms the second volume in a line issued under the general title of "Dave Porter Series."

In the first volume of this series, called "Dave Porter at Oak Hall," I introduced a typical American boy, and gave something of his haps and mishaps at an American boarding school of to-day. At this school Dave made a number of warm friends, and also a few enemies, and was the means of bringing one weak and misguided youth to a realization of his better self. Dave was poor and had to fight his way to the front, and this was not accomplished until he had shown those around him what a truly straightforward and manly fellow he was.

The one great cloud over Dave's life was the question of his parentage. He had been raised by those who knew practically nothing of his past, and when he thought that he saw a chance to learn something about himself, he embraced that opportunity eagerly, even though it necessitated a long trip to the South Seas and a search among strange islands and still stranger natives. Dave makes the trip in a vessel belonging to the father of one of his school chums, and is accompanied by several of his friends. Not a few perils are encountered, and what the boys do under such circumstances I leave for the pages that follow to tell.

In penning this tale, I have had a twofold object in view: first, to give my young readers a view of a long ocean trip and let them learn something of the numerous islands which dot the South Seas, and, in the second place, to aid in teaching that old truth—that what is worth having is worth working for.

Again I thank the many thousands of boys and girls, and older persons, too, who have shown their appreciation of my efforts to amuse and instruct them. I can only add, as I have done before, that I sincerely trust that this volume fulfills their every reasonable expectation.

Edward Stratemeyer.

April 10, 1906.

ILLUSTRATIONS

The canoe was sent closer and finally beached (page 258) Frontispiece
PAGE
Dave cleared the last hurdle, and came in a winner 87
"Tell me his name, at once!" 121
"Good-by to Oak Hall!" 137
Another flash lit up the scene 179
The former supercargo was washed off the steps and came down flat on his back 225
Billy Dill managed to catch the last one and turn him over 233
"I have come about seven thousand miles to see you" 274

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924.


The author died in 1930, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.