Edmund Dulac's picture-book for the French Red Cross

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Edmund Dulac's picture-book for the French Red Cross
by Edmund Dulac

circa 1914

Edmund Dulac's picture-book for the French Red Cross - color plate 01.jpg


ASENATH


EDMUND DULAC'S

PICTURE-BOOK

FOR THE FRENCH RED CROSS


Edmund Dulac's picture-book for the French Red Cross - title ornament.png


PUBLISHED FOR THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

BY HODDER AND STOUGHTON

LONDON ♦ NEW YORK ♦ TORONTO


CONTENTS


  PAGE
THE STORY OF THE BIRD FENG a Fairy Tale from China 1
YOUNG ROUSSELLE: a French Song of the Olden Time 5
LAYLÁ AND MAJNÚN: a Persian Love Story 9
THE NIGHTINGALE: after a Fairy Tale by Hans Andersen 29
THREE KINGS OF ORIENT: a Carol 41
SINDBAD THE SAILOR: a Tale from the Thousand and One Nights 43
THE LITTLE SEAMSTRESS: a French Song of the Olden Time 55
THE REAL PRINCESS: after a Fairy Tale by Hans Andersen 57
MY LISETTE: an Old French Song 61
CINDERELLA: a Fairy Tale from the French 65
THE CHILLY LOVER: a Song from the French 79
THE STORY OF AUCASSIN AND NICOLETTE: an Old World Idyll 81
BLUE BEARD: an Old Tale from the French 85
CERBERUS, THE BLACK DOG OF HADES 99
THE LADY BADOURA: a Tale from the Thousand and One Nights 102
THE SLEEPER AWAKENED: a Tale from the Thousand and One Nights 110
JUSEF AND ASENATH: a Love Story of Egypt 124


ILLUSTRATIONS


JUSEF AND ASENATH

Asenath Frontispiece
  PAGE


THE STORY OF THE BIRD FENG

The wonderful bird, like a fire of many colours come down from heaven, alighted before the princess, dropping at her feet the portrait 1


YOUNG ROUSSELLE

What do you think of Young Rousselle? 8


LAYLÁ AND MAJNÚN

In a high chamber of the palace — it was as wondrous as that of a Sultan 16
If the desert were my home — then would I let the world go by 18
She would sit for hours, with the bird perched on the back of her hand, listening to its soft intonation of that one word 'Majnún' 22


THE NIGHTINGALE

Even the poor fisherman would pause in his work to listen 32


THREE KINGS OF ORIENT

O Star of Wonder, Star of Night 41


SINDBAD THE SAILOR

Knowest thou that my name is also Sindbad? 50


THE LITTLE SEAMSTRESS

I never at all

Saw sewing so small!

55


THE REAL PRINCESS

Not a wink the whole night long 58


MY LISETTE

'Tis Lisette whom I adore,

And with reason, more and more!

62


CINDERELLA

'There,' said her godmother, pointing with her wand, … 'pick it and bring it along' 72


THE CHILLY LOVER

O Ursula, for thee

My heart is burning,—
But I'm so cold!

80


THE STORY OF AUCASSIN AND NICOLETTE

But Nicolette one night escaped 82


BLUE BEARD

Seven and one are eight, madam! 86


CERBERUS

Cerberus, the black dog of Hades 99


THE LADY BADOURA

Nay, nay; I will not marry him 102


THE SLEEPER AWAKENED

Behold the reward of those who meddle in other people's affairs 120


EDMUND DULAC 128


EDMUND DULACS PICTURE BOOK

PUBLISHED ON BEHALF OF THE

CROIX ROUGE FRANÇAISE

COMITÉ DE LONDRES

9 KNIGHTSBRIDGE, LONDON, S.W.

Président d'honneur Présidente
S. E. Monsieur PAUL CAMBON VICOMTESSE DE LA PANOUSE


Under the Patronage of

H.M. QUEEN ALEXANDRA


The work of the French Red Cross is done almost entirely by the willing sacrifice of patriotic people who give little or much out of their means. The Comité is pleased to give the fullest possible particulars of its methods and needs. It is sufficient here to say that every one who gives even a shilling gives a wounded French soldier more than a shilling's worth of ease or pleasure.

The actual work is enormous. The number of men doctored, nursed, housed, fed, kept from the worries of illness, is great, increasing, and will increase.

You must remember that everything to do with sick and wounded has to be kept up to a daily standard. It is you who give who provide the drugs, medicines, bandages, ambulances, coal, comfort for those who fight, get wounded, or die to keep you safe. Remember that besides fighting for France, they are fighting for the civilised world, and that you owe your security and civilisation to them as much as to your own men and the men of other Allied Countries.

There is not one penny that goes out of your pockets in this cause that does not bind France and Britain closer together. From the millionaire we need his thousands; from the poor man his store of pence. We do not beg, we insist, that these brave wounded men shall lack for nothing. We do not ask of you, we demand of you, the help that must be given.

There is nothing too small and nothing too large but we need it.

Day after day we send out great bales of goods to these our devoted soldiers, and we must go on.

Imagine yourself ill, wounded, sick, in an hospital, with the smash and shriek of the guns still dinning in your ears, and imagine the man or woman who would hold back their purse from helping you.

Times are not easy, we know, but being wounded is less easy, and being left alone because nothing is forthcoming is terrible. You have calls upon you everywhere, you say; well, these men have answered their call, and in the length and breadth of France they wait your reply.

What is it to be?

Will you please send anything you can afford to

EDMUND DULAC, c/o "The Daily Telegraph," London, E.C.