Former Secretary Clinton's Secret Emails Subpoenaed in House's Benghazi Investigation

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Graphic used by Office of Speaker of the House John A. Boehner
Former Secretary Clinton's Secret Emails Subpoenaed in House's Benghazi Investigation

Former Secretary Clinton's Secret Emails Subpoenaed in House's Benghazi Investigation


United States House of Representatives

March 5, 2015

Speaker of the House John Boehner

Former Secretary Clinton’s Secret Emails Subpoenaed in House’s Benghazi Investigation

March 5, 2015 | Matt Wolking

Late yesterday, the House Select Committee on Benghazi announced it had “issued subpoenas for all communications of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton related to Libya” in light of new revelations that she exclusively used a private email system and server to conduct official government business, skirting federal records law and preemptively thwarting any proper oversight.

In a tweet late last night, Clinton said, “I want the public to see my email. I asked [the Department of] State to release them.” Of course, that is not the primary issue, because the Obama administration only has the emails Clinton chose to release, and both the White House and the State Department have refused to say for certain that she has provided and preserved all relevant emails as required by federal law.

This is why the subpoenas are necessary, as well as the Select Committee’s “preservation letters to internet firms informing them of their legal obligation to protect all relevant documents.” Currently, nothing is to stop Hillary Clinton from destroying emails and documents she would like to keep secret.

Here’s what we do know:

[excerpted quotes from media]

Commenting on Clinton’s actions, Speaker Boehner said: “It doesn't matter if the server was in Foggy Bottom, Chappaqua or Bora Bora. The Benghazi Select Committee needs to see all of these emails, because the American people deserve all of the facts.”

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).