Gentlemen of the North

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Gentlemen of the North  (1920) 
by Hugh Pendexter
[Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, 1920. Frontispiece by Ralph Pallen Coleman.] The time is when the fur trade wars between the North West Company and the X. Y. Company was at its peak, and no trick was too dirty for them. The protagonists—a young lad and lady in the opposing camps—have problems aplenty; including drunken Chippewas and Creed (drunk on the rum exchanged for the fur). But these are the "peaceful" Indians; out there are marauding gangs of the utterly savage Sioux and Cheyennes, just waiting...

Almost all the Indians named in the story were real characters. Old Tabashaw was killed by a Sioux war-party at Wild Rice River in the winter of 1807. Eshkebugecoshe, or Flat Mouth, chief of the Pillager Chippewas, was about thirty years old at the time of the story, and was one of Henry's hunters on Red River. He is credited with influencing the Chippewas to cease their practice of poisoning, and he refused to fight against the United States in 1812. —from the Preface


GENTLEMEN OF
THE NORTH

HUGH PENDEXTER


Gentlemen of the North--frontis.jpg

"I seized her hand and waited a second to make sure I was right"

    OTHER BOOKS BY THE AUTHOR

RED BELTS

Gentlemen
of the North

By
Hugh Pendexter

Logo of Doubleday, Page & Co.jpg

Frontispiece
by
Ralph Pollen Coleman

Garden City New York
Doubleday, Page & Company 1920

COPYRIGHT, 1920, BY
DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INCLUDING THAT OF
TRANSLATION INTO FOREIGN LANGUAGES
INCLUDING THE SCANDINAVIAN

COPYRIGHT 1919, BY THE RIDGWAY COMPANY

TO
HUGH PENDEXTER, Jr.
GOOD PAL, GOOD SON,
THIS BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY
DEDICATED

PREFACE

IN building this story I have made use of the following books for colour and historical facts: Alexander Henry's Journal, edited by the late Dr. Elliott Coues; "Lewis and Clark's Expedition," Chittenden's "American Fur Trade," H. H. Brackenridge's journal of his Missouri trip in 1811. Almost all the Indians named in the story were real characters. Old Tabashaw was killed by a Sioux war-party at Wild Rice River in the winter of 1807. Eshkebugecoshe, or Flat Mouth, chief of the Pillager Chippewas, was about thirty years old at the time of the story, and was one of Henry's hunters on Red River. He is credited with influencing the Chippewas to cease their practice of poisoning, and he refused to fight against the United States in 1812. Le Borgne is drawn after descriptions given by Brackenridge, members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, Henry and others. For the sake of speeding up the action I have forced the coalition of the N. W. and the X. Y. companies by a few months. The merger was completed on November 5, 1804, and the winter express brought the news to Henry at the Pembina post on January 1, 1805.

Hugh Pendexter.

January 5, 1920.
Norway, Maine.

CONTENTS

  1. chapterpage
  2. I. The Ice Goes Out 3
  3. II. The Brigade Goes Out 26
  4. III. The Stolen Voice 51
  5. IV. Superstition Versus Rum 66
  6. V. The River Sets a Trap 85
  7. VI. Besieged 113
  8. VII. The Sioux Receive Reinforcements 121
  9. VIII. We Meet Black Cat's People 137
  10. IX. At the Mlnnetaree Village 162
  11. X. Le Borgne Plans A Feast 187
  12. XI. The Pillager Shakes the Calf's Tail 212


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1926.


The author died in 1940, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.