Indoor and Outdoor Gymnastic Games

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Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics Spalding.jpg

A. G. SPALDING

From Photograph Taken in San Francisco in November, 1879

 
 
  Spalding "Red Cover" Series of

Athletic Handbooks
No. 40R

 
 
 
 


Indoor and Outdoor

GYMNASTIC

GAMES



COMPILED BY

A. M. CHESLEY

PHYSICAL DIRECTOR ORANGE Y. M. C. A.






 
  PUBLISHED BY

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING
COMPANY

21 Warren Street, New York

 
 
 
 
 

Copyright, 1913

BY

American Sports Publishing Company

New York

© CI.A361015

PART I.

Simple Games for a Large Number.

PAGE
Ball Tossing Games
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
Mount Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
Bound Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
Curtain Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
Bombardment
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23
Mat Tag
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
All Run
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Spud
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Babylonian
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Roll Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Medicine Ball Passing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Corner Ball
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26
Captain or Centre Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
Dodge Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Peg Driving
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29
Man Overboard
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Knee Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Ball Hustle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Kick Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31


Tag Games.

Skip Away
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Whip Tag
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Three Deep
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32
Prisoner's Base
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Ham, Ham, Chicken, Ham, Bacon
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Puss in the Corner
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Group Play
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Garden Scamp
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Link Chase
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Battering Ram
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Day and Night
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Siege
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Running for Places
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
Front Duty
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
Bull in the Ring or Hare
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
Black Man
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Tender Green
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Blind Man's Buff
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Fox
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Lame Goose
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Sculptor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
The King's Run
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Follow My Leader
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Bull in the Ring or Sheep Fold
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Leap Frog Games
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
Foot and a Half
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
Tag Game
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Cross Tag
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Squat Tag
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
King's Land
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
Sailors' Tag
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
Blind Man's Biff
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
Hang Tag
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46


Racing Games.

Club Hustle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Three Indian Club Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Indian Club Circle Pull
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Short Dash
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Y. M. C. A. Potato Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Potato Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Relay Pursuit Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Obstacle Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Human Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Wheelbarrow Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
Knapsack Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
Hopping Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
Chariot Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
Tug of War
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50


PART II.

Games for a Few.

BALL GAMES.

Scrimmage Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Basket Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
Newcomb
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
Hand Polo
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Charley Horse Polo
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
60
Bar Bell Polo
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
60
Pin Hockey
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
60
Gas Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Hand Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Hand Tennis
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Indoor Base Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Ling Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Lang Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Square Ball
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Indoor Cricket
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
Goal Throwing Game
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65


Other Games and Athletic Feats.

Baste the Bear
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
Sling the Monkey
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
Walk Moon, Walk
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
Test Mettle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67

Athletic Feats.

The Palm Spring
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
Trial of the Thumb
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
The Finger Feat
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
Prostrate and Perpendicular
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
Knuckle Down
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
The Tantalus Tricks
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
The Triumph
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Dot and Carry Two
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Foot Throw
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Breast to Mouth
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Jumping Through Fingers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
Catch Penny
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
The Turn Over
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
The Long Reach
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
Stooping Stretch
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
Out Hopping Game
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
Foot in the Ring
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Rooster Fight
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Hand Wrestle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Tug of War for Two
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Pole Tug
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
French or Indian Wrestle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Sitting Toe Wrestle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Standing Toe Wrestle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Dog Fight
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Skin the Snake
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74


Oat Bag Games.

Oat Bags
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
Mat Tossing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
Circle Piling
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
Quick Passing in Circle
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
Competitive Relay Race
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
Single Line Passing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
Double Line Passing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
Stake Guard
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
78
 
 

Introduction

 

The accompanying manual of gymnastic games was worked out by Mr. Chesley while a student of mine at the Y. M. C. A. Training School. His aim was to make a compilation of games that should be of practical use under the conditions of the ordinary gymnasium. To this end he made a careful examination of the literature of the topic. Between four and five hundred games were carefully examined with reference to the following elements:

First—Adaptability in point of interest, muscular exercise, and the like to the different ages of boys and young men ordinarily frequenting gymnasiums.

Second—A sufficient degree of simplicity so that the games could be played from the rules without the necessity of personal instruction.

Third—Emphasis upon those games which admit of being played by a large number of persons at one time.

Fourth—The games have been selected also with reference to their value in effecting respiration, circulation and nutrition of the body.

The specific questions which have been asked of these games are: Are they interesting? Do they involve frequent contractions of the great muscular groups of the body? Do they demand moderate or excessive efforts? Is the effect upon the heart and circulation good or bad? Is the effect upon the position of the chest such as to interfere with respiration? Is the exercise intermittent, so as to allow the muscles to recover their tone, and not be overcome by the toxins of fatigue? Is there danger of competition such that excessive expenditure of energy will be involved, or that emotions will be unduly excited? Is the muscular action so localized as to render development uneven?

Is the game adapted to the stage of life of the individuals under consideration?

All of these games were examined not only with reference to these principles, but they were then carefully tested on the gymnasium floor with groups of boys and young men. It is not meant that each game was worked over with reference to these elements and the best work selected.

I believe the collection to be the best available. I also believe that the classification according to years is correct and practically useful. While the book is distinctly aimed at providing games for boys, personal experience has shown that a large number of these games are equally adapted to women and girls.

LUTHER GULICK, M. D.

A Manual of Gymnastic Games for Male Adolescents

It is the intent of this introduction to prove, somewhat, the value of play and of games of the right kind, at the right time, in the young man's life.

The chief reason for choosing this subject for a thesis is the large demand for suitable games for gymnasium use. As to what comprises suitable games, we will assume the following :

"It must be intrinsically interesting. The men must like to play it apart from the good that they get out of it."

(Athletic League Letters; Games VIII., p. 28, Dr. Gulick.)


The rules should be simple enough not to detract from the interest of the game. The majority of games should admit a large number of players. This is one of the most difficult, as well as one of the most important, qualifications to fulfill. Does the game "violate any of the fundamental conditions of organic life; or, to put it positively and more fairly, does it favor the fundamental conditions, the fundamental necessities of respiration, circulation, nutrition and nerve action? If it favors these it is useful from the physical standpoint."

(Athletic League Letters: Sept. 25, 1899, p. 7, Dr. Gulick.)


As to the real value of games, physiologically and psychologically, and how much they may be used with real benefit, opinions of leading lights in the physical training world are so varied that a direct statement is impossible. All believe in them somewhat. It seems to be a matter of degree which much be decided by the physical director in his own peculiar field and conditions.

At the First National Convention of the A. A. A. P. E., April 4, 5 and 6, 1889, Boston, the following resolution was freely discussed and voted:

"Whereas, we believe that two serious obstacles to the Advancement of Physical Education in the United States are:

"(1). The disproportionate promotion of athletic sports, precluding devotion of the requisite time and attention to thorough and symmetrical physical development; and

"(2). The too frequent failure of school and college authorities to recognize and encourage such systematic gymnastic training; therefore, be it

"Resolved, That while athletic sports are highly desirable, the introduction and support of gymnastic instruction in our city and country schools and colleges are of too great importance to be precluded by said sports, and that a more prominent place in the curriculum be urged for systematic gymnastic training; and be it

"Resolved, That to this end the Physical Director should have control of both gymnastics and athletics in schools and colleges."

(American Physical Education Review, Vol. IV., No. 2, June, 1899, p. 196.)

Of course, conditions in the Young Men's Christian Association are even more complicated, having to deal with students, clerks and mechanics of all ages and temperaments, in one class upon the floor, and the physical director, for numerous reasons, without the power to dictate in all circumstances.

To return to the game itself. Dr. Gulick asks the following questions: "Does it involve frequent contractions of the great muscular groups of the body? Does it demand moderate efforts? What are its effects upon the heart and lungs? Does the game keep the position of the chest so as to interfere in any way with the function of circulation and respiration? The series of contractions should be intermittent, so as to allow the muscles to recover their tone and not be overcome by the results of fatigue. Is the danger of competition such that will lead men to excessive expenditure? Are there any parts of the body that are so called into action as to render their development excessive? Is the game adapted to the stage of life of the individual for whom it is designed?" (Athletic League Letters; Games, No. VIII., p. 28, Dr. Gulick.)

We proceed to quote from Dr. Gulick's article upon the "Psychological. Pedagogical and Religious Aspects of Group Games," as published in the Pedagogical Seminary, Vol. VI., No. 2, and reprinted in the Association Outlook for February, 1900:

"The studies relate:

"(a) To the psychology of play, particularly the plays of Anglo-Saxon adolescent males.

"(b) To the relation of these play instincts to the serious business of life, and particularly to the higher social and psychical function of living.

"(c) To the ways in which the truly religious life of service to humanity may be best initiated and fostered in the boy.

"(d) To the directions in which organizations for fostering the religious life may well direct their activities. * * * We propose to examine the characteristics of the Anglo-Saxon young man as shown by his spontaneous plays, particularly his nervo-muscular plays.

"The chief interests and activities of the young of all races and of the higher animals, centre about play, and in no other direction may we expect to find dominant characteristics exhibiting themselves with the power and clearness we may in this spontaneous play life."

This constitutes our second reason for selecting the subject of games for a thesis.

"Thus it may be that we can get important light in regard to the dominant characteristics of the Anglo-Saxon young man by making careful observation of his plays. * * * We shall observe the progressive character of the plays through the life of the individual. * * * Attention is called to the accompanying chart entitled, "Anglo-Saxon Boys' Plays." By this title it is not meant that these plays are exclusively carried on by Anglo-Saxon boys, for they are inclusive as well as differentiating. The chart is to be read from the bottom upward. It starts at zero, birth, and terminates at adult life. Its usefulness must depend entirely upon the general characteristics exhibited. Psychological facts, such as we are dealing with, cannot be represented in a graphic way so as to be complete in details. For instance, the games starting at the years seven and twelve, are only approximate. In some individuals these games would be two or even three years earlier, and in others, correspondingly later, than we find them on this chart. Then, again, there is no sharp division between the plays in the three groups, as shown by these two lines; they shade into each other. That which we attempt to characterize by these three groups are the chief interests of the period. I have attempted to arrange them in a somewhat psychological order, but even in individuals this varies so that only the progression from simple to complex, as a whole, can be accepted as expressing the thought.'

"This whole article of Dr. Gulick's cannot be reproduced here owing to lack of space, but should be carefully dwelt upon by every physical director in the country. A brief epitome, giving the main thought as directly applying to our subject, is the best that can be afforded.

"He divides the play life of the individual into three periods (approximately, as stated above). The first, from birth to seven, is distinctively the period when the individual plays alone. To be sure, they grow more complex as the boy grows older, but they are distinctively individualistic. To quote from the article:

" 'This large group of plays, it will be observed in the chart, are arranged in a column growing upward. By this it is meant to infer that these activities, these plays, having once entered into the life of the individual, remain throughout life of a greater or lesser degree of interest, and that further interests of a similar character come in.'

"It will be noted that I have inserted a few tricks of a solely individual nature, which are not distinctively applicable to the period of male adolescence, but which may or may not prove interesting to some individuals who happen to be alone in the gymnasium. The whole subject of gymnastics has its beginning in this period. The reason for this, as developed by Dr. Gulick, is most interesting.

" 'Recent investigators tell us that during the first one, two or three years of life, the spinal cord, together with certain lower parts of the brain, comes into its most complete activity; that it is the period for the acquirement of all those activities that depend upon the spinal cord. These we will know are the reflex activities. They constitute activities dependent upon the "lower level," so-called, of the nervous system, according to the Hughlings-Jackson theory. Thus, this period of development is the instinctive and the reflex period. Habits are being formed. "The best development of the later life is related to the best development of the earlier life."

" 'The second period of play life is from seven to twelve. Here the activities whose centre has been exclusively one's self changes to those plays whose centre of interest is one's self in relation to others. A glance through the list as outlined in this period will show what is meant. It is the individual competitive age. "The great group of tag plays — cross tag, wood tag, prisoner's base, black man, and the like — exhibits the hunting instinct. The great group of ball games of which the most common are One Old Cat; Rounders; the Marble games; these vary in details all over the country."

" 'The whole group of track and field sports acquire interest at this period — racing in its various forms; throwing in competition, jumping and pole-vaulting in competition, etc. This period should be watched as developing ethics, morality, justice — in fact, the higher development of the individuality.

" 'Coming now to our third major division, we find still more highly organized plays and games. These begain approximately at twelve. As I have remarked before, they may begin earlier or may be postponed; in some individuals they doubtless never begin. Attention is called to the characteristics of this group of games — base ball, basket ball, foot ball, cricket, hockey, are the chief games of the Anglo-Saxon young man.'

"Dr. Gulick goes on to describe this period as one of gangs, predatory activities, hero-worship, and, most of all, the stage when 'team-work is the key-note.' Not that all play team-work, but that is the ideal, the tendency of the period. It is the stage of co-ordination and self-sacrifice. The reason is obvious. 'Savages who have reached the stage of co-operation under a chief, of fighting in organized groups, are doing that which the Anglo-Saxon boy commences to do soon after he is twelve.' Thus, he explains, the youth rehearses his race instincts, and arrives at the age of adolescence to the period of highest development in his ancestors, that of self-sacrifice. Here his altruistic qualities begin to assert themselves, and he goes on to those higher developments of Christian thought and activity, reached only by the highly civilized (Anglo-Saxon) Christian man of to-day.

"The author goes further into the religious aspect of the subject, which we again recommend to the attention of our readers. The subject-matter seems of vital importance to the physical director of the Young Men's Christian Association.

"Enough has been said, we hope, to prove somewhat the value of games of the right kind, at the right time in the young man's life. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, while apparently knowing nothing of the systematic development of the man, as outlined by Dr. Gulick, must have had a presentiment of the value of play life. His thoughts are so delightfully apt and in line with the argument that we wish to express that we desire to quote from his 'Outdoor Papers':

" 'Never yet did an ill-starred young saint waste his Saturday afternoons in preaching sermons in the garret to his deluded little sisters and their dolls without living to repent it in maturity. The precocious little sentimentalists wither away like blanched potato plants in a cellar; and then comes some vigorous youth from his outdoor work or play and grasps the rudder of the age, as he grasped the oar, the bat or the plough.'

"Again, wisely said Horace Mann: 'All through the life of a pure-minded but feeble-bodied man, his path is lined with memory's gravestones, which mark the spots where noble enterprises perished for lack of physical vigor to embody them in deeds.'

"Again, 'We must not ignore the play-impulse in human nature, which, according to Schiller, is the foundation of all art. Meet Nature on the cricket ground or at the regatta; swim with her, ride with her, run with her, and she gladly takes you back once more within the horizon of her magic, and your heart of manhood is born again into more than the fresh happiness of the boy.'"

("Play in Physical Education," G. E. Johnston; American Physical Education Review, Vol. III., no. 3, p. 179.)

The belief that play activity has its root in instinct is by no means novel. Professor James, in his chapter on instinct, catalogues what seem to him to be the most prominent of the tendencies which are instinctive in the human species, and in the list is play. In 1877 John Strachan, a physician of Edinburgh, issued a little book in which he endeavors to show that play is instinctive, and that it is Nature's method of preparation for mature life, claiming that play activity, alone, is sufficient for the highest development of all the faculties, mental or physical. Mr. Johnson also claims in this article that play is a preparation for future serious occupations, and cites the play of kittens or young dogs as an example. But observation seems to teach us that in many cases the play activity seems to be a rehearsal of race instinct, as in the hunting and fighting games of boys. We are inclined to think that it is both.

The boy who is building a hut in the woods and the girl who is making a dress for her doll are working with all their might, but are nevertheless at play, acting from "inner necessity and impulse," and from tendencies which are clearly instinctive. Moreover, it is the glory of play, that it may not only prepare for future serious occupations, but does actually in some happy cases, develop into a life work. Art belongs to play, and he who paints or chisels or writes because he must is only following out a play impulse into and through maturity. It is serious now, and for that reason, and for dignity's sake, perhaps should be termed work rather than play.

To recapitulate. Play activity is rooted in instinct. It is a law of life, obedience to which prepares for the serious occupations of maturity. As a generator and conservator of nervous energy it surpasses all other forms of exercise. As a character builder it produces strength and positiveness of will. It is especially needed in the education of the city poor. Play should follow deep-seated and well-defined hereditary tendencies of the human species. Not only in games, but what may be termed in distinction, play should be utilized.

ANGLO-SAXON BOYS' PLAYS (Nervo-Muscular)

by A. M. Chesley

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p17.jpg
 
 
 

Note

These games are especially adapted to the Adolescent Period, but in many instances are played throughout the country by classes of all ages. Most of them have been tried, personally, by the writer, with success. A few, coming with splendid recommendation and seeming obviously adapted to the need, have not been tested

PART I.


SIMPLE GAMES FOR A LARGE NUMBER


Ball Tossing Game

Form a circle facing centre, double arms' length distance between players. One player in centre. Players toss a ball to each other, left or right, or over the head of one player only, to player beyond, the centre player endeavoring to get the ball or knock it to the floor, and in case of miss exchanging places with the player who caused the failure, either by poor throwing or catching.


Ball Tossing Games
(Mind and Body, Vol. II., No. 19, p. 136.)

Form a circle in front in close order, wide enough to permit the passage or escape of the centre player. Pupils face the centre. The centre player tosses the ball to whomsoever he likes, such player in turn tossing the ball back to the centre player who must catch it and escape with it through one of the openings, the player who threw the ball endeavoring to catch him before he can succeed. Places are exchanged when the centre player has been caught.

The centre player of a circle tosses the ball to his playmates a number of times agreed upon — four, six or eight times. Upon the last return toss the players scatter, the centre player endeavoring to hit some one with the ball before the players can get too far away from him. The player who is hit exchanges places with the centre player.

Ball Passing Games and Diversions
For Basket Ball; also to be played with Oat Bags.
(Mind and Body, Vol. IV., No.. 42, p. 141.)

I. The players are divided into two parties. Each party then arranges itself into two ranks facing each other. The ranks are from two to five paces apart, as space will permit, and the two parties are two or three paces apart. The ranks in each party are numbered 1 and 2. All being ready, a ball is given to the first member of Rank 1 in each party. He throws to the member of Rank 2 just opposite him, who throws it to the second member of Rank 1, and so on. When the ball gets to the last member by the same zig-zag path, the party which returns the ball to the first member first, wins the game. (See figure.)

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p20a.jpg

2. The players are arranged in four ranks, numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. (See figure.) Ranks 1 and 2 face ranks 3 and 4. Ranks 1 and 3 constitute one party and 2 and 4 the other. Hence the ball must be thrown over one rank each time. Otherwise the game is like No. 1.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p20b.jpg

3. The players form a circle facing inward. Each half of the circle constitutes a party, as shown in the cut. Otherwise the game is the same as before.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p21a.jpg

4. The two parties form separate circles, the one within the other. The inner party faces outward, the other party faces inward. Two balls are used by each party.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p21b.jpg
5. The parties form separate circles and the ball must pass around the circle three times. The party which first accomplishes this wins.

Mount Ball
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 6, 1894.)

This ancient game is played under difficult but very amusing conditions. The players "pair off" according to height, strength and agility, and form a double circle, faces to the centre, with from two to six paces interval between pairs, according to the number of players taking part. A coin or other article tossed in the air decides who of the pairs shall become "pack-mule" or "pony" and who "rider." Those designated as riders take a stride position sideward and brace themselves by placing both hands on the knees, which should be kept extended, the body being forward in order that the riders in the rear, outer circle, may readily mount by straddling their shoulders, upon the command of the leader of the game to "Mount." The riders having mounted, play "catch ball," the ponies (as the play becomes better understood) growing restive, turning right, left or about, in order to make the ball catching as difficult as possible. When the ball has been missed by a rider, all immediately dismount and flee, the pony of the rider who missed the ball quickly picking it up and commanding all to "stand" or "halt." All riders obey by standing still and the pony endeavors to hit a rider who may jump upward, or drop, but not otherwise leave his place. The other ponies remain in position in order that the riders may be readily distinguished. If the player who aims to hit a rider is successful in properly hitting him, places are exchanged, riders becoming ponies and ponies riders. If not successful, the game is continued as at first. The ball must at no time be held by a player but tossed as quickly as caught, no matter in what position the rider may find himself. The play may also be so directed that any pony can pick up the ball and aim it at the nearest rider. The leader of the game gives the command to mount and dismount, determining the "misses" and "hits."

Bound Ball
(Mind and Body, Vol. I. No. 10, p. 16.)

The players divide into two equal parties and take their places on both sides of a line marked on the floor, at a distance of about five paces from it. The players on each side group themselves so that each man will have a space of from four to six feet square to move about in. The leader of the game throws the ball into the midst of the players of either group in such a way that it will rebound, the play consisting in keeping the ball by striking it with the hand from above, downward, and upon the first opportunity directing it into the opposite group on the other side of the line. This group retaliates in the same manner, landing the ball in the first group, and so on. The score keeper notes the following errors, twelve of which lose the game: Failure to strike the ball from above; failure to bound the ball, before landing it in the opposite field; "deadening," i.e., permitting the ball to roll instead of bounding it. In case the ball does not rebound in the opposite field, the group from which it came has another trial.

Curtain Ball

(Mind and Body, Vol. IV., No. 38, p. 34.)

Similar to Volley Ball. Half of the players stationed on one side of a curtain about eight feet high and half on the other, thus hiding the players from each other's view. Rest of the game same as Volley Ball. Two umpires necessary.

Bombardment

Similar to Battle Ball. More can play. Have as many pins or Indian clubs set up as men playing. Players all stand in front of pins at either end of gymnasium and keep as many balls busy as you have on hand. Every pin knocked down counts one point for the side knocking it down. Balls may be thrown against the wall behind the pins and carromed back, knocking down pins in that way. Men must not step over the centre line in throwing the ball or for any reason. With the use of the medicine balls and two or three basket balls, twenty players can be kept exceedingly busy.

Mat Tag

(Era—1893—Page 872.)

Place mats on the floor some distance apart. One man takes his place in centre of the floor with the ball and tries to hit one of the other players while they cross from one mat to another, the mats being places of safety. When he hits another player, the player hit takes his place.

All Run

In "All Run" a square is made in the centre of the floor in which all of the players gather, one man being chosen or volunteering to take first throw. The ball is then thrown in the air and everyone runs to get as far away from the centre as possible except the thrower, who must catch the ball and then cry "Hold," at which all the rest instantly stop. He then chooses a man at whom to throw the ball, he being obliged to stand on the spot where he caught the ball. If he hits the man at whom he is throwing, that player takes his place; if he misses him, the players all return to the centre and he is given another trial. If he misses the second time, he is obliged to stand twenty feet from the square, with his back to the players and each player has one chance to hit him with the ball.

Spud

"Spud" is played ordinarily with an old indoor base ball somewhat soft from use. A basket ball or volley ball may be used. All gather around one of the players who drops the ball, at the same time giving one of the names or numbers. The person called immediately obtains possession of the ball and throws from where he stands at one of the players (who scatter). If he hits a player that man strives to hit another and so on until someone misses hitting. One miss counts one spud. The person who misses continues the game in the centre. Three misses or spuds make the guilty party liable to punishment in "All Run."

Babylonian
(Era— 1893— p. 311.)

Played with the big medicine ball. Team composed of eight or twelve men each; eight seems to be the better number. The teams are placed in line sideward, facing each other. The men clasp one another around the waist and in no case must the hold be broken. At the word "Go," each team rushes toward the centre, using the feet only in working the ball toward the centre, each team endeavoring to get the ball across the opposite goal. Should a hold be broken or the men fall down, the whistle is blown, lines formed over again and the team breaking or fouling loses a point, three fouls making a goal. Best two in three or three in five goals constitute the game. The ends are the men who must do the best work, preventing the ball from going out at the sides, also keeping the lines closed up. If the ball goes out of bounds, it must be placed in the centre again; then the game continues. Tripping, breaking hold or unnecessarily rough play constitute fouls, at the discretion of the referee.

Roll Ball
(Mind and Body, Vol. V., No. 55; Mind and Body. Vol. IV., No. 39; Mind and Body, Vol. II., No. 24.)

Players form, in a circle with hands grasped. A starter stands in the centre and tries to kick the ball so that it will roll but not leave the ground, and pass through between two members of the circle. These roll it back. This continues until the ball goes through, when the player on whose right side it passed, exchanges places with the centre player.

Medicine Ball Passing
(Physical Education, Vol. IV, page 90.)

Great sport can be attained by adding several articles; for instance, basket ball, base ball, tennis ball, Indian club, dumb bell, etc., if the class is large. This combination keeps one in a state of excitement, and perhaps in some instances too much, but still is a very practical game for the gymnasium. A penalty may be attached to the person dropping or failing to pass accurately. It may be to withdraw from the circle after making two or more such errors.

Corner Ball
(Mind and Body, Vol. V., No. 56, p. 186.)

A space about thirty feet long and twenty feet wide is needed for the game. (See figure.) A line (1) divides this into two equal parts. At each corner is a base. Each party forms in a straight line about eight feet from the line. Two members of each party take positions in the bases on the other side. Number one of the first party then throws the ball over the heads of the second party, to one of his fellows on either of the bases. If he catches it, he throws it back. The opposing party tries to intercept the ball and, if successful, gains one point. The play then continues, the other side throwing the ball.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p26.jpg

The rules of the game are:

  1. The members of each party may move about freely in their space.
  2. No member may cross the line.

Captain or Centre Ball
(American Physical Education Review.)
March, '99, p. 73

The field is divided into two equal parts with a neutral space of about two feet intervening, each half again being subdivided into five squares or bases (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) and a centre base (6) as per diagram.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p27.jpg

Place a spring-board in the centre square. The line up of the players is the following: A takes centre. B first, C second, D third, E fourth, and F fifth bases, while guards G, H, I and J line up in the opposing players' territory. The opposing players or team take the same position on the other side of the field. Play begins with the umpire taking his place in the neutral place and tossing up the ball. The players of both sides try to gain possession. If, for instance, guard H succeeds, he throws the ball to one of the basemen of his side, say B, who in turn will throw the ball to centre A, while the guards of the opposing team do their best to prevent a throw to centre, by holding up their hands, catching the ball and throwing same to their own side.

  1. If a baseman is successful in throwing the ball to centre, it counts one point for his side. Then the ball is returned to the umpire who begins play again by tossing it up.
  2. If the centre player, in trying to catch the ball, steps off the board, it does not count one point, but he has the privilege of returning the ball to one of his basemen without interference of the opposing guards.
  3. If a throw from a baseman to centre is blocked by the opposing guards, he should pass the ball on to the next baseman or to the guards of his side, who pass the ball on to the next baseman, etc., keeping the ball moving as much as possible.
  4. A throw from a guard to centre does not count one point, but centre can pass the ball to one of his basemen (opposing players being allowed to interfere).
  5. Guards are not allowed to cross the boundary line or to step within the squares, nor are the basemen allowed to leave their bases. Leaving the bases or crossing the boundary line to interfere with a play or gain possession of the ball is to be punished by giving the ball to the opposing side, or awarding them a point,
  6. Kicking or striking the ball out of a player's hands may be allowed, but if all rough playing is to be avoided it should not be permitted.
  7. If the captain or player of a team is about to protest a decision of the umpire, he must raise his hand, and then the umpire will call time, but if he leaves his place before time is called, the umpire will give one point to the opposing team.
  8. If the centre is so thoroughly blocked that the ball cannot reach him, a point may be scored by passing the ball from base to base to their respective order in an uninterrupted circle.

Two fifteen-minute hales may be played.

The usual number of players is twenty, ten in each team; but we have played with as many as thirty or forty. If forty, number of bases and guards may be doubled.

Dodge Ball
(Mind and Body, Vol. IV., No. 38, p. 34.)

Of any even number of players, half form a circle, while the other half stands inside the ring, facing outward. Those in the centre dodge the ball, which, while in play, is thrown by any of those forming the circle, with the intention of striking the centre ones out. Those put out take their places among those of the circle, and have an equal chance at those remaining in the centre. Only one is put out at a time. This is kept up until only one is left, who is titled King, after which the players exchange places, i. e., those who were in the centre now form the circle.

Note.—If the touch is preceded by a bound of the ball it does not count.

*[1]Peg Driving, or Another Centre Ball
(German- American Gymnastics, Stecher, p. 301.)

This game may be played indoors as well as outdoors, as many as ten to fifty participating. There must be a sufficiently large and even surface on which to form a circle, with room enough between the players for them to move about freely. Each player must have a stick or wand about three feet long. A basket ball is used. If played outdoors, each player except one makes a hole about four inches in diameter in front of the place he occupies in the circle in which to place one end of his stick. If played indoors, a chalk ring may be made to indicate a hole. A hole or chalk ring large enough to hold the ball must be made in the centre of the circle.

In beginning the game all players place one end of their stick into the centre hole under and around the ball. Upon counting one, two, three, all uplift the ball with their sticks and rush for a ring or hole in which to place one end of their stick. when all holes are taken, one player will be left as "centre player or "it." He must now roll and push the ball from where it may have fallen, into the centre hole, with his stick, at the same time guarding against the other players who strive to direct the ball from its course, it being the duty of all players to prevent him from getting it into the centre ring or hole. Attacks on the ball are best guarded against by placing the stick in front of the ball so as to ward off the thrusts in its direction. Any player may leave his place to attack the ball, but as soon as the centre player spies a vacant hole he may abandon the ball and aim to place his stick in the vacant hole. The players who may have left their places will then scramble for holes (or rings), and one of their number will always be left as centre player. Such centre player then attempts to get the ball into the centre ring or hole. If successful, the game is begun over again. During the game any unoccupied ring or hole may, at any time, be taken by any player, and the more this is done the livelier and more interesting the game will be.

Ball Hustle

Conducted in the same manner as Club Hustle, page 47, excepting that a basket ball is used instead of an Indian club.

Man Overboard
(W. H. Kinnicutt, M.D., Physical Director Cleveland Y.M.C.A.)

A rollicking hygienic game. Any number of players sit in a ring and throw a heavy medicine ball in any direction. The object is to throw with such force that the catcher is overbalanced and rolled backward to the floor. The legs must be kept before the body and not interlocked with another's.

Knee Ball
(W. H. Kinnicutt, M.D., Physical Director Cleveland Y.M.C.A.)

An hygienic game simply. A large medicine ball is placed in a ring of players, who have their arms around each other's waists, the ball being lifted with the feet to position, is kept from falling to the floor by the players bumping it with their knees. About ten players make the best game.

Kick Ball

Any number of players sit in a ring with hands braced behind hips; a medicine ball—preferably 14-inch—is kicked or pushed with the foot or feet in any direction. An hygienic game only.

TAG GAMES
Skip Away
(Mind and Body, Vol. II., No. 24, p. 242.)

A circle is formed and hands are grasped. One of the players, running on the outside, taps another who immediately starts to run in the opposite direction, the place he left remaining vacant until one or the other shall have returned to it first. The unsuccessful player continues the running, etc. The players, upon meeting, may exchange greetings, bow to each other, or perform some other courtesy or exercise before completing the circuit. This play, if the number of players is sufficiently large, may also be played in a double circle, an inner and outer ring, the players facing each other and grasping their uplifted hands, thus forming an arch under which the two running players must wind their way.

Whip Tag
(Mind and Body, Vol. II., No. 20, p. 158.)

For any number. Form a circle, all facing the centre and holding their hands behind their backs. One running around the circle will drop the "beetle" (a sack similar to a policeman's club, stuffed with cotton batting, or a towel with a knot in the end will do) into the hand of another. The person receiving the "beetle" quickly turns upon his right-hand neighbor, and with a series of blows chases him around the circle and back to his place. If the neighbor can run faster than the holder of the "beetle" he will, of course, escape the blows. The holder of the "beetle" now takes the place of the last leader.

Three Deep

(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. i, p. 13.)

Twenty-four or more players form a circle of pairs with space enough between the players (who stand closely one behind the other, facing the centre of the circle) to allow the runners to turn and run in all directions. Two players on the outside of the circle and at a distance from each other begin the game. One of them, the "tagger," seeks to tag the other player before he can secure a place in front of any of the pairs forming the circle. If he succeeds in this roles are changed, the player tagged becoming "tagger" and the former "tagger" in return endeavors to secure a place in front of some pair. But whenever the runner (the player pursued) has succeeded in getting in front of a pair before being tagged, then the hindmost (the last or third, in the respective rank) must take to his heels and seek to evade the unsuccessful "tagger," who now turns his attention to him. In seeking to evade a tagger the successive players may run in any direction, either left or right through and across the circle, but not pass, in front of any one rank to another rank in such a manner as to induce wrong starts. A hindmost player may also form in front of his own rank, making the second player in such rank hindmost or "third." The play is always directed against the third or last of a rank, two players being the number limited to each place.

(When classes of players in the beginning are too large the circle may be formed by rows or ranks of threes, instead of twos or pairs.)

Expert players can form several circles and run from circle to circle, two pairs playing simultaneously. The above play can be varied in a number of ways, as follows:

(a) The players may reverse the order of forming for the play, facing outward from centre instead of toward the centre. The pursued player in this case forms in the rear instead of in the front, and the first takes the part of the third or hindmost player,

(b) The last form may also be played in such a manner that all the front or outside ones grasp hands sideward, while all the second ones place their hands on the shoulders of the front players. In this form of the play the second player must push the front player away from his place at the proper time (when a third player enters the circle and places hands on his shoulders). The entry into the circle must not be hindered.

(c) The circle of pairs may be formed so that the players face each other with uplifted arms, hands grasped to form an arch. The pursued player may take his place between any two players, the one on whom his back is turned becoming third or pursued player.

(d) The last form can also be played with the class in other formation than that of a circle; the pairs may also scatter over the playground and play without the holding of hands or uplifted arms.

(e) Another form is to form two ranks, one on each of opposite goals, about twenty paces apart. A player steps out toward a goal and taps or hits any of the outstretched hands. The player tagged becomes pursuer, and must try to catch the tagger before he can reach his own goal. If successful, the player caught must go to the tagger's goal and the tagger turns his attention to his victim's goal.

(f) In the first description of the game various exercises may be introduced, as vaulting over each other or slipping to place between the legs of those in front, all players standing in stride position sideward. In a spirited game it is not necessary for the runner to stand in front of a pair, he simply touching base, the place in front of a pair, with a hand or foot, sufficing.

Prisoner's Base[2]

(Champlin's Cyclopedia of Games and Sports.)

Played by any number of persons, though the best number is from twelve to sixteen. Two "Bosses" or enclosures, are marked off, each large enough to hold half the players, and two "Prisons," a little smaller, some distance from the Bases, according to convenience. Two methods of laying out ground are shown in the diagrams.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p34.jpg

The players are divided into two opposing sides, each of which occupies one of the Bases. A player from one side begins the game by running beyond the bounds of his Base and one on the opposite side pursues him. A second man from the first party chases the pursuer, and so on, each party sending out as many men as they choose. If any one is touched, while out of bounds, by a player on the opposite side who left bounds after him he must go to the prison belonging to the enemy, and stay there until he is released by one of his own side. The Prison of each side is opposite the Base of the other side, as shown in the diagrams. No one is allowed to touch the catcher as he returns to his Base, which he must do at once. A prisoner can be released by any one of his friends who can run from his Base to the Prison without being caught. (When more than one player is in Prison they may link hands, and reach out into the playing space, the man touched being the only one released.) The prisoner and his friend may then return to their Base in safety. But if a player is caught while attempting a release he must himself go to Prison. The game is won by the party that succeeds in getting all its enemies into Prison at the same time. It is necessary for a player to remember who of his opponents left their Base before him and who after him, so that he may know whom to chase and whom to avoid. When a large number of players are out of bound this makes the game quite complicated.

Ham—Ham—Chicken—Ham—Bacon

This game is played by the youths of Washington, D. C, on the streets, using the curbs as goals. The game can well be applied to the gymnasium, however, using the mats at either end of the floor or a chalk line at either end.

All the players congregate on one side. One player in the centre endeavors to make them step off the curb by shouting, "Ham—Ham—Chicken—Ham—Bacon," the word "bacon" being the signal for all to cross to the other side, while he endeavors to catch one. The one caught must help him catch the others. If any one steps off before the centre man says "Bacon" he has to go to the aid of the catcher. For instance, the trick is adopted of shouting, "Ham—Ham—Chicken—Ham" and stopping short and causing some one to step off. Or of substituting other words for "Bacon," which may draw some one from their base. When all are caught the game begins anew.

Puss in the Corner

This game may well be applied to the gymnasium for a large number, using various obstructions as corners. If, when the change is made from one corner to the other, more than half the distance is covered, the "puss" is obliged to continue, thus crowding the other "puss" from his corner and enabling the catcher to obtain a vacant corner, only one "puss" being allowed in a corner at a time. The catcher tries to get into the empty corners, forcing the others out. The "puss" caught or left without a corner is "it."

Group Play
(Mind and Body, Vol. II., No. 18, p. 118.)

Any multiple of three, four or five can engage. The players having been divided into corresponding groups march (if five groups have been formed) to the four corners of a large square (the room), one of the groups forming in the centre of the square. The position of each of the five groups must be sharply defined by chalk lines on the floor, i. e., for each group a house (small square) should be drawn within the walls of which the respective group players must be stationed. Any one of the players now leaves his group and proceeds toward the centre group, whereupon a player from any other group immediately seeks to fill the place made vacant by the first player. Other players now make similar attempts to fill the vacancies ensuing in the different groups. Meanwhile the player who began the game bestirs himself to get a place in any one of the squares. Should the game, at any time, come to a halt because all the squares are filled, then the last player to enter a square selects the next leader. The game is readily understood with a little practice, and may be changed in a number of ways, the players walking, hopping or running from place to place, etc.

Garden Scamp
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 2, p. 13.)

Players form a ring grasping hands sideward. One of the players, on the outside, says, "Who let you in my garden?" to which the scamp replies, "No one," and runs, the gardener giving chase. He may be armed with the "beetle" or towel as in Whip Tag. He is obliged to follow the "scamp" through the openings, performing all the movements, as jumping over one player, crawling between the legs of another, somersaults, etc. The chase ends with the scamp being caught, or when the gardener loses track of him, by performing the wrong movement in some way. The physical director, referee or players may decide.

Link Chase
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 3, p. 15.)

Two players link hands and attempt to tag some of the surrounding players. All players tagged take their places between the two first players, the chain growing longer with each new addition. The outstanding players can break the chain if pressed too closely. If successful in this, those forming the chain must run to base to unite again, the other players tagging or riding (straddling) them by jumping on their backs while on their way to the base. Players stepping out to rest must not leave bases. The last two players caught must begin the game anew.

Battering Ram
(Mind and Body, Vol. III., No. 25, p. 17.)

Players form a circle, joining hands, one of their number being inside and one outside of the same. The centre player attempts to escape from within the circle by jumping over or by passing quickly under the arms of the players, or by breaking through, the player on the outside assisting him in any way he can. Upon his escape the player who is most responsible takes his place within the circle.

Day and Night
(Mind and Body, Vol. IV., No. 40, p. 90.)

Players divided into two parties, formed in two lines, back to back, about three paces apart, as shown in cut.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p37.jpg

One of the lines is named the "Day Party," the other the "Night Party." The leader has a disk painted black on one side and white on the other. (A coin may be used instead of the disk.) In front of each party is a goal. The leader throws the disks into the air. If the white side is up when the disk has alighted he cries out, "Day." The "Day Party" then rushes toward its goal and the "Night Parly" pursues, tagging as many members of the "Day Party" as possible. These they take back to their own goal. The captured members are now out of the game. The sides now change, the disk is thrown again, and the party whose side turns up starts for goal as before. The game continues in this way until all the players on one of the sides are out.

Siege
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 7, p. 16.)

The party is divided equally. One side (determined by toss of a coin) has possession of the field, and is distributed over the same in such a manner that each player has ample room to move about. The other side, on the outside of the field (a chalk line six feet from the wall, around the room), surrounds it by movements calculated to engage as many of the enemy in the contest, from as many points as possible. The game consists in overpowering the enemy, and making as many prisoners as possible. The stronger players must cope with their equals, the weaker ones with their kind. Wrestling on the ground or dragging is not to be permitted. If, by means of pulling, pushing or carrying, without interference of a third party, a player succeeds in forcing his opponent from the battlefield, such vanquished opponent must repair to the prisoners' guard without. If a player from outside the field is brought safely within (a distance of five feet on either side of the line determining the outcome) he must repair to the prisoners' guard within (on the centre of the field). Prisoners who escape from their guards unseen cannot participate in the game again, but must remain outside of the playground.

Running for Places
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 6, p. 16.)

Form circle and number off in threes. A corresponding number of players, not numbered, are in the centre of the circle. These alternately call out a number, whereupon all players holding such numbers must quickly exchange places, the player having called the number striving to catch one of the running numbers. If he succeeds in catching one he takes his place and another player calls out a number.

Front Duty
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 11, p. 16.)

The players select two leaders whose generalship throughout the game can be relied upon. The leaders, in turn, enlist their followers, and the ranks of both sides filled, the opposing forces march in opposite directions and fly their respective standards above their camps. The forces bivouacing soon become deeply interested in an engagement between the outposts or pickets, of whom a number have been placed on guard by each commander at a short distance from camps. The outcome is finally decided when one of the combatants has been overpowered and brought within the enemy's picket line. The struggle between the outposts continues until the last on either side return to their camp to report that the enemy is in sight. Immediately a line of battle is formed, the players in single or double lines in front locking arms or grasping hands, the command to "Charge" following. Amidst songs and shouts and the din of battle the hosts meet. The side which is successful in forcing its opponents to retreat a given distance wins the battle.

Bull in the Ring, or Hare
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 11, p. 16.)

All form circle around the hare. The hare now tries to escape by all possible means. Should he succeed the players pursue him, the one first catching him becoming hare in the next game.

Black Man
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. II, p. l6.)

"Black man" at one end of the floor, players at other. If the "black man," while running to the goal which the players have left, taps a player such player must help him be "black man." The "black man" and all who have been caught in this way may grasp hands.

Tender Green
(German-American Gymnastics, Stecher, p. 320.)

The game is very like "Black Man," in some places called so. It differs from "Black Man" in that the one who is "it" must fold his hands and must tag one or more of the other players in this position only. After he has caught one or more of the players they must join hands, and the end players only are allowed to tag the other players, the other players having right to break through the line if they can. When all the players are caught the first one tagged is "it."

Blind Man's Buff

This game needs no description. Care should be taken that the blind man does not injure himself against the walls.

Fox

This is a game in which knotted handkerchiefs are required. A small base called "The Den" is marked out and one of the players, elected by chance or otherwise, takes his station within it and represents the "Fox." When the "Fox" is ready he calls out, "Twice five are ten," which sapient remark is answered by the out players with "Fox, come out of your den." Fox immediately complies with this request and hops out, endeavoring to touch one of the players who dodge around him and do their best, without touching him, to make him put both feet to the ground, which entitled them to give him a good drubbing with their knotted handkerchiefs while he is running home. If the Fox can touch one of his would-be tormentors while he is hopping the player touched becomes Fox.

Lame Goose
(German-American Gymnastics, Stecher, p. 318.)

A goal is selected to which one of the players, called "Lame Goose," repairs. The other players call out to him, "Lame goose, lame goose, can't catch anybody" and run up and down in front of his goal, tantalizing him in all manners conceivable. "Can't I, though," replies the Lame Goose, and starts after the players. He must not, however, run after them, but must take three steps only and then hop on one leg, and as soon as he "breaks" all the players rush at him and drive him to his goal, pommelling him on the back with their fists, until he has reached it. If, however, the lame goose succeeds in tagging one of the players he joins the other players in driving the one tagged to the goal, as described above, and the player tagged is "it."

Sculptor
(German-American Gymnastics, Stecher, p. 316.)

One of the players, called the "Sculptor," arranges the other players in different positions and attitudes as statues. No player dares move or speak, for as soon as he does the sculptor punishes him by beating him with a knotted handkerchief or towel (the sack-beetle). After having arranged the players to suit his fancy the sculptor leaves the playground, saying: "The sculptor is not at home." No sooner is he gone than the statues come to life, sing, dance, jump and play havoc in general. On the return of the sculptor he counts, "One, two, three," and any player who is not in his former posture at "three" receives a beating with the knotted handkerchief from the sculptor. Should the sculptor punish the wrong statue all the players rush at him with knotted handkerchiefs and drive him to a goal previously decided upon, and the game is resumed with some other player as sculptor.

The King's Run
(German-American Gymnastics, Stecher, p. 320.)

Two sides, divided as equally as possible in regard to numbers and strength, stand at a convenient distance opposite each other, the players grasping hands firmly. Each side has a captain or king, as he is sometimes called, who stands at the left end of the line. At his command one of the players runs with all his might and tries to break through the enemy's line. If he succeeds all the players cut off from the captain's end of the line must cross over and join the other side. If he fails he must join the enemy's side. The other side then sends out one of their men, and so on, until but one man, the king, is left. He is allowed three trials to break through the enemy's line and redeem his fallen fortunes; but if in three times he does not succeed his side has lost the game. To make the game shorter the players cut off from their own line and the runners who fail to break through the enemy's line are out of the game until it is ended.

Follow My Leader
(Sports and Pastimes of American Boys, Chadwick.)

A bold, active boy should be selected as leader, and all the other players must arrange themselves in a line behind him. He commences the game by jumping, running, hopping or getting over any obstacle that may present itself, and then continues his course, scrambling over everything and varying his actions as much as possible; all his followers must, according to the rules of the game, do exactly as he does. If any one fails in performing the tasks he must take his place behind all the rest until some other player makes a blunder and in his turn goes last.

Bull in the Ring, and Sheep Fold

In "Bull in the Ring" one takes his place in the centre of the circle and endeavors to break out. Upon doing so, the rest chase him, the one catching him taking his place as bull. A similar circle is formed for "Sheep Fold," the sheep inside, and the wolf out. The wolf attempts to break through the joined hands so as to reach the lamb, but if he does so, the sheep-fold opens on the opposite side letting the lamb out and closing the wolf in. The latter now tries in the same manner to get out, and if he does so, the lamb is admitted again. If the wolf succeeds in catching the lamb, the two players between whom he broke through the sheep fold last, become the wolf and lamb in their turn.

Leap-Frog Games

All are familiar with the ordinary leap-frog where the players stand side by side, in which case the leaper goes over them side-wise, or they stand in file, in which case he leaps from their backs over their heads. When he has thus gone over the whole line, he makes a back and the player who is thus left in the rear, becomes the leaper.

For competition the players may be divided equally, forming two lines. At the word "Go," the two rear players jump swiftly over the backs of the players in front. When every player has jumped over the back of every other player, that line has completed its work and, if ahead of the other line, wins the race. A most interesting game if given a fair trial. The same game may be played crawling between the legs instead of jumping over the backs.

Foot and a Half

The person to be jumped over moves by degrees farther and farther from the point where the jump begins. A line is drawn (sometimes called the "Garter") to mark where the jump begins, and whoever steps on it must take the place of the player leaped over. After the players in turn have leaped, the last cries "Foot and a Half!" and the player who is making the back thereupon places his right heel in the hollow of his left foot, advances the latter so that its hollow covers his right toe and then brings up his right foot to its original position. The players then leap again, always beginning at the "Garter," after which the back advances again in like manner, and the game goes on until some one treads on the "Garter" or fails in leaping. The unsuccessful one then makes a back and another game begins. This game is also called "Fly the Garter" and "Foot It."

Sometimes it is varied by allowing the last player in the first round to make a back at the spot he reaches in his jump. The back thus changes at each round, and as the position is moved forward such a distance each time, the players are often allowed one jump or a hop, skip and jump between the garter and the back.

French boys play one called "Sant de Mouton avec Mouchoirs" ("Sheep's Leap with Handerchiefs") in which each leaper is required, in his first turn, to lay his handkerchief on the back of the player he leaps over, and at his second turn to pick off his own handkerchief, leaving the others. He who fails makes a back for the others.

Tag Game

Played by any number of persons one whom tries to "tag" or touch any of the others he can. If he succeeds, the one tagged must take his place. When "tag" succeeds in touching another, he cries "No tag," which signifies that the player so touched must not touch the player who touched him until he has chased and touched somebody else. No player can be tagged when touching the "goal" which is any object agreed upon, such as a portion of a wall, etc. Or if the boys pursued can touch either wood or iron, they are safe, the rule being that he must touch them as they run from one piece of wood or iron to another.

Cross Tag

Any player who is chased can be relieved by any other player running between him and the one trying to tag him. The latter must then run after the player who ran between, till he in turn is relieved.

Squat Tag

When a player who is pursued is tired, he is allowed to stoop or squat close to the ground, the pursuer not being allowed to touch him in this position. The number of squats allowed varies from two to eleven.

King's Land

One, representing the king, stands the within the boundaries agreed upon at the beginning of the game. The other players can be touched by him only when they venture inside the boundary. By running in and out again on all sides, they strive to confuse the king and divert his attention from one to the other. In Connecticut the forbidden land is sometimes called "Van Diemen's land;" in New York, "Dixie's Land;" in Philadelphia, "Golden Pavement;" in Devonshire, England, "Judge Jeffrey's Land," and the old English name for it was "Tom Tiddler's Ground." The French call the king "Crow."

Sailor's Tag

All should be blindfolded. Place a knotted handkerchief or towel in the hand of each player. The players may be divided off in pairs, if desired. They then attempt to strike each other, blowing a whistle or crying "Here" after every strike. The one who crys out then moves away quickly, while the opponent slashes furiously at the place where the sound came from or where he thinks the other may be. Exceedingly laughable.

Blind Man's Biff

Place boxing gloves on one, or a number of pairs of player (blindfolded), and let them "biff" each other.

Hang Tag
(W. H. Kinnicutt, M.D., Physical Director Cleveland Y. M. C. A.)

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p46.jpg
This changes at once from an imbecile to an intensely active and interesting game by introducing this change: Any apparatus allowed for hanging; only one person allowed at a time upon a support and the last one assuming the hanging position has the claim, causing the former possessor to secure another support in order to be safe. A player cannot be caught when his feet do not touch the floor or mat.

RACING GAMES

Three Indian Club Race

Each player has three clubs placed in front of him at one end of the gymnasium. He must take the clubs, one at a time, and place them behind a certain line at the other end of the gymnasium and return to the starting line. If a man fails to place a club properly or stand it up, he must return and do so before winning or completing the race.

Another form of the "Club Race" is as follows:

The vertical line is the scratch from which the runners start and to which they run to finish the race. The square dots are spots on which the clubs are stood prior to starting the runners.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p47.jpg

The club each runner carries is made to stand over the crosses before another club can be picked up. The semicircular lines indicate the enclosures in which all the clubs must stand before the final dash to the scratch is made.

Club Hustle

Divide players equally. Form ranks in "front dress." Place an Indian club in the hand of each foremost man. At the word, "Go," he stoops and passes the club between his legs to player behind him, who continues it on down the line. When the rear player receives it, he runs to the head of the line and starts it again. When every player has thus been at the head of the line and the original starter has received the club at the foot of the line, and placed it in an upright position at the head of the line, the game is over. The side that completes the circuit first wins.

A little thought and ingenuity will suggest numerous ways of varying the sport, but a few suggestions are herewith given.

(1) At the signal, the club is grasped with the left hand and passed down the line, being touched only by the left hand of each man. The rear man passes it behind him and it is then passed forward by the right hands alone. The first man sets the club down across the line where it must remain standing or no point is made. If any but the one hand touches the club on its journey, a foul is counted, or the line wins that first gets the club to its place without fouling.

(2) Any number of clubs, say six, can be passed in the same way. All the clubs must be replaced across the line and remain standing before a side can score.

(3) One club can zig zag down and back, the first man grasping the club with his left hand and passing it behind him to his neighbor's right and so on. The rear man must pass it around behind him before starting it forward.

Indian Club Circle Pull

Form a circle, grasping hands. Place as many clubs as there are players inside the circle, in such a position that the players may move about them freely. Indicate which way the circle shall revolve, and start. Each man endeavors to make his neighbor knock down a pin by pulling him into them. Knocking down two pins causes the displacement of a player, taking a pin with him.

RACES

Short Dash

Run in heats of four, any distance compatible with the floor-space. First two men run in the second round, semi-final or final.

Y. M. C. A. Potato Race

(Rules found in the Official Handbook of the Athletic League of the Young Men's Christian Associations of North America.)

Potato Race

All are acquainted with the old-fashioned potato-race, where an equal number of potatoes for each player are placed in a line (as in the Indian Club Race, just described), the race being finished or won when all the potatoes (one at a time) are placed in the receptacle at the starting line and the final dash made for the finishing line. Rules found in the Official Handbook of the Amateur Athletic Union.

Relay (Pursuit) Race

For a running track, two teams of any equal number may enjoy this race. One team assembles at one end of the track and one at the other. One runner from each team is selected and started at the same time, both going in the same direction. Any number of laps may be completed (we will say two) when another runner stands ready to tap the hand of his mate and complete two laps, endeavoring to catch the opponent. If one side catches the other before all have run, that side wins, or the side that finishes its circuit first wins. Or the pursuit may be continued, the first runner taking up the running again for his team and so continuing until one side catches the other. The wildest excitement prevails and close watch will need be kept for fairness.

Obstacle Race

Place a number of pieces of apparatus around gymnasium, to be clambered or jumped over. Run two players at a time, narrowing it down to a final heat.

Human Race

Divide off in pairs. One player carries another from one end of the gymnasium across a certain line, when he in turn is picked up by him who was carried, and returned across the starting line. This may be run in heats and finals, thus increasing the interest.

Wheelbarrow Race

Divide off in pairs. One player takes the other by the feet, forming a wheelbarrow. He who pushes his barrow (who, of course, runs on his hands) across the finish line, at the other end of the gymnasium first, wins. Heats and finals, if desired.

Knapsack Race

Each player stands inside a cloth meal sack, holding the bag up with his hands. Heats and finals.

Hopping Race

On one foot (right or left) or both feet. Heats and finals.

Chariot Race

Two locking arms and racing two others around the hall. Three or four abreast may be used. Breaking hold gives race to other party. Heats and finals.

Tug of War

The tug may be pulled in two ways; in the first, there is no limit of time, but the teams pull until one has pulled the other over a given line; in the second, the pulling is for a certain number of minutes, and at the end of that time the team wins on whose side the middle of the rope is. In both methods the middle of the rope is marked, usually by tying a piece of colored cloth around it and a person acting as judge or referee holds it exactly over the line, as he gives the signal to begin pulling.

Standard rules for Tug-of-War may be found in the official handbook of the Amateur Athletic Union, published in Spalding's Athletic Library, by American Sports Publishing Company, 16-18 Park Place, New York.

A simpler method, if a rope is not accessible, is as follows:

Any number of boys standing behind each other, facing the center of their line (one-half of their number on each side of the centre), place their arms around the waist of the front player and lock or clasp hands, taking the best attitude for the exercise to follow. The two strongest boys, who were selected for the centre stays, place their right arm over each other's left shoulder, locking or grasping their hands or wrists on their backs. The pulling is frequently continued when the players are on the floor.

PART II.


GAMES FOR A FEW

Scrimmage Ball
(E. D. Angell, Plattsburgh, N. Y.)

Floor plan like following sketch. A floor marked for basket ball can be used. The ball should be a medicine ball weighing from four pounds upward. There should be an even number of men on each side, half of each team acting as forwards and the other half as guards.

THE GAME.

The ball is placed on the floor half way between the two goals. The players line up back of their respective goals.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p52.jpg

Positions of two Scrimmage Ball teams of eight men each at beginning of game and also floor plan. Guards step up to the line after forwards rush for the ball.

●—Forwards. ○—Guards. A-A—Goal Line. B-B—Foul Line. C—Ball.

At a signal from the referee, the forwards from each team rush for the ball and try to get it across their opponents' goal line by pushing, or scrimmaging it along with one hand. The guards' of each team must remain back of their respective goal lines and act as goal defenders. When a goal is made the ball is placed in the centre of the field again and at the referee's signal, the guards rush for the ball and the forwards become guards, and so on throughout the game, the guards and forwards changing positions at the end of each goal. The guards must remain back of their goal line and in defending goal are allowed to place one foot in front of goal line. If they step over the goal line with both feet to block a play it is a foul.

Fouls.—All rough play such as hitting, pushing, tackling, etc., propelling the ball with both hands at the same time, picking up the ball and throwing it, kicking the ball, or blocking with any part of the body except the hand. A player cannot hit the ball when he is down. When a man falls, he must be on his feet before he can touch the ball again. Violation of this rule is a foul.

Penalty for fouls.—When a foul is made, the forwards from the offended side are allowed to "kick a goal." The offenders must retire back of their goal line while the forwards stand in front of the goal on the foul line. (See diagram.) The ball is thrown into the air by one of the forwards while another of the forwards tries to bat it across the goal line as it descends. The forward that throws up the ball cannot bat it. The side that committed the foul try to prevent a goal by knocking the ball back into the field of play. If the ball touches the floor back of the goal, it is a goal and counts one point for the side that "kicked the goal," but if the ball is blocked and lands in front of the goal line it is again in play (the same as in Basket Ball), and the forwards from each team rush for the ball and continue the game as before. A regular goal from the field counts two points. A goal on a foul counts one point. The distance of the foul line from the goal line must be governed by the weight of the ball. The game should be played in two halves of five or ten minutes' duration. There is no off side play and no out of bounds.

In a large gymnasium or in certain circumstances, bounds may be used, the man touching the ball first putting it in play as follows: Have all the forwards stand at least ten feet from the man out of bounds and have him put the ball in play by scooping or knocking it into the field. The chief value of the game lies in the fact that no man has a more important position than any other on the team. As they become forwards and guards alternately, every man is afforded the same amount of exercise and the same opportunity to distinguish himself.


Basket Ball

Rules published yearly in Spalding's Athletic Library, by American Sports Publishing Company, 16-18 Park Place, New York.


Newcomb
BY CLARA G. BAER.
HOW TO ARRANGE THE GAME.

Divide the room into two equal parts by drawing a chalk line across the floor. This is called the Division Line.

About seven feet each side of this line draw shorter lines for the bases. If convenient, it might be well to draw these lines with colored chalk, or better still, have both division line and bases painted on the floor (black paint preferred) in lines from two to three inches in width. The space between the Jaases, separated by the division line, is called the "inside" of the base; beyond, where the players stand, "outside." For convenience the players are designated by colors (or numbers). If the class colors are pink and blue, one-half of the class play pink, the other blue.

The blues guard the ground of the pinks, and vice versa. The players are arranged at irregular intervals beyond the bases, which they are not permitted to cross except where the ball is thrown up by the referee (the instructor). This is done at the beginning of the game to decide which side shall have possession of the ball and after each foul. In order to prevent too great a rush for the ball it is well for each side to elect a captain, when the captains alone are permitted to cross the bases. If the game is played on the field and boundary lines are required, the ball is declared "out" when it touches outside of these lines.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p55.jpg

THE OBJECT OF THE GAME.

Is to make the ball touch the opposite ground beyond the base, when it is called a "touch down," and counts for the side sending the ball. At first "touch downs" are easily made, but when the players become expert in handling the ball it is seldom permitted to reach the floor, and the interest in the game increases proportionately.


RULES.

  1. The players shall stand outside of the bases.
  2. The players shall not step inside of the bases, except when the ball is thrown up at the beginning of the game and after each foul.
  3. The ball must be thrown by the hands. It may be thrown with one or both hands. It cannot be kicked.
  4. No player shall catch or throw the ball while on her knees. She must be on her feet.
  5. No player must fall on the ball.
  6. A "touch down" shall count one for the side sending the ball. A foul one against the side offending.
  7. A majority of points shall decide the game.
  8. The referee shall throw the ball directly upward from division line at the beginning of each game and after each foul.
  9. The referee shall decide the time, keep account of "touch down" and fouls.
  10. If a ball is batted inside of the bases by a player receiving it, it is declared "out," and is again thrown up by the referee. It does not count for, or against, either side.

FOULS.

  1. Throwing the ball between division line and either base.
  2. Pushing a player in order to gain possession of the ball.
  3. Violating Rules 2, 3, 4 and 5.

TACTICS.

As the object of the game is to guard the ground on which you stand, cover it as effectually as possible by even distribution of players, taking care that the best players are not together. If you have a weak spot try not to let the other side discover it, or they will throw their ball in that direction. Vary your plays. For a time aim far beyond the opposite base, then of a sudden throw the bell just outside the bases. This is a difficult play and should be only attempted by one who has a sure aim, as it may lead to a foul. For long distance, throw high or the ball may be intercepted. A low ball, when well sent, is very effectual for, unless a player has her movements well under control, in stooping she is apt to fall on the ball, which is a foul against her side, beside the "touch down" if she fails to catch the ball. Whenever possible, save a player on your side from the possibility of violating Rules 4 and 5. Personally, strive yourself to be the best; for the more expert the individuals become, the better will be the playing of each side as a whole.


Hand Polo
(Era, 1895, page 129.)

RULES.

1. Size of Team.—Each team shall be composed of five or six men, according to the size of the floor space.

2. Clothing and Shoes.—Players must wear rubber or soft-soled shoes (not leather or spikes). No one can wear hooks or any buckles that are liable to catch in coming in close contact with another player.

3. Umpire and Referee.—There shall be one umpire and two referees to each game. The umpire shall make all decisions, call all fouls, place ball in play, keep time; shall have power to warn and rule off the floor any vicious or ungentlemanly player, shall settle all disputes and keep account of fouls. The referees shall watch the goals and call goals when they are made.

4. Rules in Playing.—The ball shall be placed in the centre of the floor, at an equal distance from each goal. Each team shall line up back of their respective goals. At a signal from the umpire both teams shall rush for the ball, and continue to play until the signal to stop is given by the umpire. (The usual time is fifteen minutes innings with five minutes for rest.) When a goal is made, the referee shall call such and the umpire shall give the final decision whether it was made fairly or not. No one has a right to claim or call goals except the referee and umpire.

5. Fouls among the Players.—Fouls shall be called by the umpire. Any of the following acts shall constitute a foul. Any rough interference such as tripping, catching, holding, kicking, hooking, pushing, stepping upon or throwing an opponent, is a foul and shall be so called by the umpire; the ball then being passed to him shall again be put in play by picking for it at a signal from the umpire. If a foul is made within the distance of ten feet from the goal, it shall be placed ten feet to the side or back of the goal and there picked for. The goal tender can rest on both knees. No one is allowed to lie down across the front of the goal. Any interference with the goals shall constitute a foul. No player can interfere with another player in any way when that one is mare than six feet from the ball.

Fouls with the Ball.—The following shall constitute fouls with the ball: Picking it up with the hand, closing the fingers over it on the floor, holding it in the hand, catching it while it is in the air, kicking it, lying on it intentionally or throwing it.

6. Cost of Fouls.—Three fouls made in succession by one team between the making of a goal, shall constitute one goal less on the erring team; if said team has no goal to their credit, the opposing team shall have one goal added to their number. When a goal is made, the fouls of both teams shall be withdrawn.

7. Exchange of Position.—Whenever a goal is made and at the end of every inning, the teams shall exchange positions.

8. Disabled.—When a player becomes hurt in any way necessitating the calling of time, two minutes shall be given to resume playing before another player takes his place.

9. Disputes.—If any misunderstanding or quarrel shall occur, the umpire shall settle such matter in the quietest possible manner according to his own judgment, then calling upon the men to play. If either of the teams object to play in the time of three minutes, he shall proclaim the game in favor of the obeying team.

10. Fair Play.—The only fair way of opposing one another in playing, is by shouldering and bucking, which can only be done within the distance of six feet from the ball. The ball must be struck with the open hand, not the fist, or any mechanical device. The ball can be stopped with any part of the body. When a ball driven fairly hits the curtain, whether it goes through the goal or not, it shall be called a goal.

11. Ball.—The ball used in playing shall be a regular lawn tennis ball. A new ball shall be put into use for every match game.

12. The goals shall be made of wood, of two uprights and one cross piece, nothing to be used to hold them together at the bottom. The size, inside measure, shall be three feet six inches by three feet six inches. The inside of the goals shall have a curtain of very light weight material supported from the cross piece only, or of iron pipe and netting in the shape of a cage of same dimensions as the foregoing goal. These rules are not absolute, but are subject to change and modification upon the mutual agreement of the contracting teams.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p59.jpg


Position and name of each player both "lined up" and "in action."

Charley Horse Polo

Same rules as in Hand Polo except that regular hockeys are used. Shouldering and bucking are not allowed. Shin guards should be worn.


Bar Bell Polo

(W. H. Kinnicutt, Physical Director Cleveland Y. M. C. A.)

This game can be played by any number of players equally divided into two teams or sides. A basket ball is used, and an ordinary bar bell in the hands of each player is the "hockey." The ball is put in play in any convenient way, and each side endeavors to drive it into the opponents' goal (a parallel bar at each end of field, or jump standards) hitting the ball only by thrusting—no swinging blows allowed.

This method of striking is well adapted to the bar bell, and there is little danger of injury to other players or opponents.

The usual rules of polo are modified to meet the conditions of the game.


Pin Hockey

Played with hockey and tennis ball. Each player has two pins to guard. They are set two feet from the wall at either end of the gymnasium, and each pair of pins should be far enough from the next pair to allow the guardsman to move comfortably about them. Players stand in front of their pins, in beginning the game, and the ball is rolled in by the referee, to the centre. It is then anybody's ball. The walls should be as smooth as possible as the carroming against them, thus knocking down pins, is an important feature of the game. A board at either end of the gymnasium, behind the pins, may be used if the wall is not smooth.

While these games are of the fastest and most fascinating nature, it is questionable about the use of them in fine gymnasiums. The hockey do dent the floor somewhat, pins are sometimes split, windows not properly barred are broken, and unless the audience is in a safe place, ladies' hats are often disarranged.

Scoring.—Every pin knocked down scores one point for the offense, even though a man knock down his own pin.


Gas Ball

A tennis ball bounded in the centre of the floor by the referee starts the game. Each side endeavors to bat the ball into their opponents' goal or basket, as in Basket Ball. The ball may be batted, bounded or scooped with one hand only. The ball shall not be picked up or the fingers closed over it.

Fouls.—Same as in Basket Ball, with the above amendments.

Penalties.—Free throw, as in Basket Ball.

If possible, no boundary lines should be used. Carroming against walls should be encouraged if facilities permit.


Hand Ball

Rules found in Official Handbook of the Athletic League of the Young Men's Christian Associations of North America.


Hand Tennis
(Mind and Body, Vol. III., No. 28, p. 83.)

Even surface about 16 x 40 feet, divided into halves by a regular tennis net about two feet six inches high. The required

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limit lines are marked in the usual way (indoors with chalk), About three feet from the end line, another line, the "toe line." is marked. About ten feet from the net on both sides is marked the "short line." The players select sides and take positions behind the toe line. The beginner bounds the ball on the floor, striking it with either hand, as it descends again, to direct it over the net to the opposite player. Failure to send the ball over the net, or to land it within the lines on the other side of the net, results in forfeiting the ball to the opposite side. Should the opposite side, however, fail to return a properly directed ball, or drive it over the lines, the first player scores a point. Failure to stand between end lines at start of game, or, touching the net with any part of the body, counts a point for the opposite side. In active play the delivery can be made from any place within lines.

Indoor Base Ball

Rules published annually in Spalding's Athletic Library, American Sports Publishing Company.

Ling Ball
(Physical Education, Vol. IV. , No. 7, p. 91.)

The number that can play this is limited only by floor space.

Two lines parallel to each other are drawn upon the floor about 25 feet apart. An indoor base ball and bat should be used. The batter stands just behind one line, near its end, and behind this same line all the men that are to bat should stand, while the other team should be stationed about so as to catch the fly or pick up the grounders. The pitcher should stand on the line about two yards from the batter, and throw up the ball which the batter strikes. If the batter thinks that he cannot reach the opponents' side before being struck with the ball, he may go to one side, still keeping behind his own line, and wait for a chance to reach there. If he succeeds in getting there and back without being struck, it is a run.

Any number of men that have batted may be behind the lines at once, as long as there is a man home to take the bat in his turn. There are no fouls. A man must be given a fair chance to strike the ball. Three strikes are out. Three out, all out. If a man is not home to take his turn at the bat, it puts that man out.

Lang Ball
(Physical Education, Vol. IV., No. 7, p. 91.)

The ball used may be either a basket ball or light medicine ball. The rules for ordinary base ball will hold in this game, with the exceptions which will be mentioned. Any number may play the game. One side may play another or the players may rotate, as in base ball. A high bar is needed by which the batter can support himself by the hands. The ball must be struck with the bottom of one or both feet. A ball passing in front of a perpendicular drawn from the end of the bar is a fair ball. A ball struck by any other part of the body, or passing behind the aforesaid perpendicular, after being struck, is a foul. Three fouls are out. If the batter misses the ball entirely it is a strike. One strike is out, if caught on the fly. A fly caught is out under any circumstances. Convenient places on the floor may be chosen as bases. If a light ball is used, the runner may be struck with it between bases and thus be put out.

Square Ball
(Mind and Body, Vol. I., No. 9, p. 11.)

An open square (usually the whole gymnasium) and a rubber or hand ball, or bean bag or basket ball are necessary for this game. Four to eight players stand one at each of the corners (if eight, place one between any two corners) as outposts, and a like number in the centre of the square. The outposts toss the ball from post to post, the inner players avoiding proximity to the posts at which the ball may be held for the moment, the duty of the outposts being to throw the ball at the centre players, when opportunity offers for a sure strike. Upon striking a player who may avoid the ball in any way he can without leaving the square, the outposts quickly flee, the player who was hit as quickly as possible securing the ball and commanding all to stand. He then endeavors to strike the nearest outpost. All misses of the respective sides, centres and corners, may be scored with chalk marks at the respective places, three marks sufficing to oust a player. The party first out loses the game.

The game may also be played in such a manner that all outposts hit must enter the square, the last outpost, upon being hit, entering the square for a new game.

Indoor Cricket

Stand one Indian club at each end of the gymnasium. Make a spot with chalk one foot in front of each club, as "touch.' Six on a team is a good number. The batters (both from the same team) take their positions at either end of the gymnasium, with another Indian club apiece, placing one end in "touch."

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(X) Touch club. (.) Wicket. (1) Batters (2) Bowlers. (3) Fielders.

The duty of the bowlers is to knock down the club at the other end of the gymnasium with an ordinary basket ball, an old one preferred. He must stand behind "touch" in bowling. The batter defends his "wicket" with the club in his hand. If opportunity is offered, on striking the ball, he exchanges places with his mate at the other wicket, scoring one run. If either of the wickets are knocked down while either of the runners are out of touch, it puts the runner out who is nearest that wicket and the next in order takes his place at bat. When all that side has batted and been put out, the other side comes to bat. A wicket knocked down puts a man out, also a fly caught, a foul caught or a runner struck with a batted ball, or touched out.

Goal Throwing Game

Divide players equally in two lines, back to back, one end of the line near the basket. Place a ball each in the hands of the two players farthest from the basket. At the word "Go" the balls are passed quickly up the lines (passing to every man) until the head player receives it. He immediately throws a goal. If he fails he continues to shoot until he succeeds. (A fair man stationed underneath with a wand can keep the basket clear of thrown balls.) He then runs to the last man in line and passes the ball up in the same manner as in starting the game, to the head player who continues the game. The line which finishes first (every man having thrown a goal) and the ball returned to the foot of the line, wins the game.

The lines may be strung the length of the gymnasium, one line throwing in one basket and one in the other.

OTHER GAMES AND ATHLETIC SPORTS

Baste the Bear
(Games and Sports for Boys, Geo. Routledge & Sons.)

The players should toss up for the first bear who kneels on the ground within a circle marked out for that purpose; each bear may select his own master whose office it is to hold him by a rope and use his utmost efforts to touch one of the other players, as they try to thrash the bear with their handkerchiefs knotted and twisted very tightly. If the bear's master can touch one of the assailants without dragging the bear out of the ring or letting go the rope, the boy touched becomes bear, selects his keeper as before mentioned, and the sport continues.

Walk, Moon, Walk.
(Games and Sports for Boys, Geo. Routledge & Sons.)

All tie large knots in one corner of their pocket handkerchiefs and then toss up to see who shall be "Moon"; the loser is "Moon," and he must be blindfolded. "Moon" now stands with his legs stretched apart, while his playmates go behind him in succession, and thrust their handkerchiefs between his legs as far as they can and in whatever direction they wish. When all have done this, one of them cries "Walk, Moon, Walk!" which is a signal for the blindfolded player to walk forward until he treads upon one of the handkerchiefs, when, in an instant the other players pick up their knotted handkerchiefs with which they belabor the unlucky owner of the one trodden on, as he runs to a distant base and back, after which he becomes "Moon" and the game continues as before.

Sling the Monkey
(Games and Sports for Boys, Geo. Routledge & Sons.)

One of the players called the "Monkey" has the end of the rope tied around his middle in such a manner that his feet only just touch the ground; in his right hand he holds a piece of chalk. (The horizontal bar may be used to be suspended from.) The other players wait for a signal from the Monkey, and then commence drubbing him with their knotted handkerchiefs; the poor Monkey slung to the bar cannot defend himself, but if he can succeed in marking one of the players with the chalk, he is immediately released, and he that is chalked has to take his place. This is a famous game among sailors and affords considerable amusement to spectators as well as to the players themselves.

Test Mettle
(Mind and Body, Vol. II., No, 22, p. 200.)

Any number of pupils formed in two equal divisions on the opposite ends of the field can participate in this game requiring strength, skill and courage. A player called upon by his comrades advances to meet an adversary from the opposite field, who holds out his outstretched arm as a counter-challenge to hit him upon it. The challenge accepted (by striking with the open palm) the first player must either seek to return to his line by running or overpower his opponent by holding him to the ground. If he does not succeed in this, another from his side may advance to help him, another from the opposite side engaging in the fray and so on. No more than four pairs should be engaged at one time, in order to avoid confusion. Each time a prisoner is secured (overcome) the command "Halt" is heeded by both sides, the players returning to their respective goals. In all other respects the game is conducted the same as Prisoner's Base with the exception that all players running to the wrong (the enemy's) side, are regarded as deserters, who can be rescued as prisoners, or re-enter the play on their former side.

ATHLETIC FEATS
(Sports and Pastimes of American Boys.)

The Palm Spring

Performed by standing at a little distance from a wall with your face toward it and leaning forward until you are able to place the palm of your hand quite flat on the wall; you must then take a spring from the hand and recover your upright position without moving either of your feet. It is better to practice it first with the feet at a little distance only from the wall, increasing the space as you gradually attain greater proficiency in the exercise

Trial of the Thumb

Place the inside of the thumb against a wall or the edge of a table, being careful that neither of the fingers nor the palm of the hand touch it; next move your feet as far back as you possibly can, and then take a spring from the thumb and recover your standing position without shifting your feet forward. It greatly facilitates the spring if you rock yourself to and fro three or four times before you take it; and it is best to begin, as in the "palm spring," with the feet at a little distance from the table, increasing the "trial" of the thumb by degrees.

The Finger Feat

Place your hands horizontally across and close to your breast and put the tips of your forefingers together; another player should then endeavor to separate them by pulling at each arm; but if you hold them firmly in the manner described, he will be unable to achieve it, although he may be much bigger and stronger than you. It is not proper for the second player to use sudden or violent jerks in his attempts; he must employ only a steady, regular pull.

Prostrate and Perpendicular

Cross your arms on your body, lie down on your back and then get up again without using either your elbows or hands in doing so.

Knuckle Down

Consists in placing the toes against a line chalked on the floor, kneeling down and getting up again without using the hands or moving the feet from the line.

The Tantalus Tricks

Desire a player to stand with his back close to the wall, then place a piece of money on the floor at a little distance in front of him and tell him he shall have it if he can pick it up without moving his heels from the wall. It will be found impossible, as, in bending, a part of the body must necessarily go back beyond the heels.

Place the left foot and leg and the left cheek close against a wall; then lift the right foot slowly and endeavor to touch the left knee with it and stand steadily in that position.

The Triumph

Put your arms behind you and place the palms of your hands together, the fingers downward and the thumbs next your back; then turn your hands keeping the tops of the fingers close to your back and the palms still together, until the ends of the fingers are between your shoulders, pointing upward toward your head and the thumbs outside.

Dot and Carry Two

This is to be performed by three players, whom we will style A, B, and C, in the following manner: A, standing between B and C, must stoop down and pass his right hand behind the left thigh of B and grasp B's right hand; he should next pass his left hand behind the right thigh of C and take hold of C's left hand; B and C should each pass one arm around the neck of A, and the latter, by rising himself gradually, will be able to lift the others from the ground.

Foot-Throw

Put a basket ball between your feet in such a manner that it is held between your ankles and the inner side of the feet; then kick up backward with both your feet and in this manner try to jerk the ball over your head, catching it when it comes down.

Breast to Mouth

Measure the length of your arm from the outside of the elbow to the tip of the middle finger and mark it down on a stick; then hold the stick horizontally before you, with your elbow close to your side, placing the middle finger exactly over the mark, and keeping the fingers at right angles with the stick, and the thumb closed over them. You must now try to raise the left end of the stick from the horizontal up to your mouth, which should be done without changing the place of your fingers, bending your head, or moving your elbow from your side.

Jumping Through Fingers

Hold a stick of wood between the forefingers of each hand, and, without letting go, try to jump over it both forward and backward. You may also jump over your middle fingers placed together without touching or separating them with your feet.

Catch Penny

Place on your elbow three or four penny pieces in a heap, then drop your elbow very suddenly so as to bring your hand rather below the place where your elbow was and try to catch the money before it falls to the ground. A few trials will enable you to perform this trick with the greatest facility.

The Turn Over

Take a short run, place the toe of the right foot against a wall and throw the left leg over it, making a complete turn at the same time so that when your foot touches the ground your back is to the wall. The right foot is the pivot on which you turn and you must take especial care to keep it quite close to the wall while you perform the Turn Over.

The Long Reach

Chalk a line on the floor and then place the toes of both feet on it, being careful that they do not pass beyond; then throw forward either the right or left hand, no matter which, so far and no farther than you can easily spring back from and readily regain your upright position, without either moving your feet from the line, touching the floor with the hands in throwing them forward, or scraping the floor with them in the spring back. When you have in this manner ascertained the utmost distance to which you can stretch and from which you can recover, without scraping the hands or altering the position of the feet, you just stretch as far forward as you possibly can end, while supporting the body with one hand, chalk a line on the floor with the other. You may, in order to bring your body lower, move your feet backward from the line marked on the floor and by so doing you will be enabled to make a much greater stretch than you could otherwise have done. If you can manage to chalk two lines, your own length apart, it is a tolerably good stretch, but with a little practice you may chalk considerably further than that measure.

Some persons, in performing this feat, rest upon their elbows instead of their hands.


The Stooping Stretch

Chalk a line on the floor and place the outer edge of the right foot on it, and at a little distance behind the right foot place the left heel on the line. Then take a piece of chalk in your right hand, bend down and pass the right hand between your legs and under the right knee, and chalk a line on the floor as far from the former line as you can reach, but not so far but that you can easily recover yourself without touching the ground with your hands or removing your feet from the line. Your knee and body may project beyond the chalked line, provided you keep your feet properly placed.

There are a number of feats to be performed with chairs but which do not seem practicable for the gymnasium.


Out Hopping Game
(Mind and Body, Vol. II., No. 17, p. 99.)

Five players stand within a circle formed by from twenty to thirty boys. Four players attempt, by hopping on either the right or the left foot, to oust the remaining player from the circle, who seeks to avoid all thrusts and attacks by running and dodging. Upon being "hopped out" the next five players in order enter the circle, and so on, until all players in turn have been in the ring. The hoppers must at all times keep their arms folded over their chests, and never use their hands, simply pushing with their shoulders.


Foot in the Ring

Two players, one of which takes a lunging position forward left or right, the forward foot placed in a chalk ring six feet in diameter, the other player begins his manœuvres hopping on one foot, also with arms folded, and attempts by adroit attacks (feinting and pushing) to displace the other player. The other player must defend himself as best he can. The party in the ring loses, when displaced; the other player upon moving one of his feet.


Rooster Fight

Similar to Foot-in-the-Ring, excepting that both hop, each trying to displace the other by shouldering. Each player stoops and grasps his own ankles; then shoulders opponent as before. The first to remove hands from ankles or be bowled over is beaten.


Hand Wrestling

Two players face each other, feet planted firmly, full stride position left, right hands grasped. Each tries to displace the other. One foot moved displaces a player.


Tug-of-War for Two

Same position as in Hand Wrestling; hands grasping a strap or handle. Upon the word "Pull," try steadily to pull each other toward the designated goal.

Pole Tug

The game may be varied with the use of wands or poles, pushing or pulling. In pulling with pole, they stand with backs to each other and pull away from the centre.


French or Indian Wrestle

Two players lie on backs, side by side, locking arms, heads in opposite direction. Count "one, two, three;" at each count the adjoining legs are brought to perpendicular. At count three, catch at the knee and endeavor to make the opponent perform a back roll.


Sitting Toe Wrestle

Two players sit on mat facing each other, knees bent perpendicularly with toes touching opponent's. Pass stick under knees and clasp hands (not opponent's) in front of knees. At word "go" attempt to get your toes under opponent's toes and upset him.


Standing Toe Wrestle

(Y. M. C. A. Young Men's Era, 1892, page 1592.)

The arms are folded and, hopping on one foot, each wrestler tries to make his opponent put his other foot upon the floor, by a side movement of the leg.


Dog Fight

(Y. M. C. A. Young Men's Era, 1893, page, 341.)

Two players place themselves on their hands and knees, facing each other, about three feet apart. Place an endless strap or anything that will not cut into the flesh over the heads (which must be kept up and back) onto the necks. At the word "Go" the players pull against each other until one of them is pulled off the mat, or his head pulled forward, thereby releasing the strap, thus showing the other to be the victor.

Skin the Snake
(For any number.)

Players stand in line at "front dress." Each player stoops over, putting his right hand between his legs and grasping the left hand of the player behind him. At a given signal, the last man in line lies down on his back, putting his feet first between the legs of the player in front of him. The line walks backward striding the bodies of those behind, and immediately lying down upon having no more to stride. Upon completing the transformation, all are lying on their backs. Then the last man who laid down rises to his feet and strides forward up the line, the rest following as fast as their turn comes. During all these manoeuvres the grasp of the hands has not been broken. Upon performing rapidly, this presents a peculiar spectacle, yet is very simple.


Bean Bag Games
(Oat Bags and Passing Games, by R. A. Clark, M. D.)

The writer has been asked to put into shape some bag games which have proved useful in his work. The value of the medicine ball is generally conceded, but its usefulness for class work is limited, from the fact that several are needed and they cost from $4.50 to $10.00 apiece, net. In looking for a less expensive substitute for the medicine ball, the writer began to experiment along the line of "bean-bags." The beans soon became oats, but the bags were so useful that they ought to be generally known. They are made as follows: Cut a circular piece of pasteboard on a radius of 7¼ inches to serve for a pattern to the tent maker. He will cut out two circles of heavy (10-oz.) duck for each bag and sew them together with heavy thread a quarter of an inch from the edge, leaving an opening of about three inches. Turn it inside out, sew around again, close to the edge, put in four pounds of oats (have the oats right there, if possible) and sew up the opening strongly. There are 32 pounds of oats to the bushel, and oats for 20 bags will cost one dollar. The cost of making twenty bags, including canvas, will be, at most, $3.00, making the total cost of twenty bags $4.00, or less than the price of one medicine ball. The bags are durable, costing nothing for repairs, and can be used in numerous ways with either large or small classes. Be sure to have half the bags made of plain duck and half of striped, so that in team work there shall be no confusion. A number of games are described herewith, beginning with the least active.

Mat Tossing

Place two mats as far apart as the bags can be tossed. Choose sides and toss as in quoits, one side using white bags, the other striped. A bag does not score unless completely on the mat, i.e., not touching floor at all. There should be one bag for each man. To increase difficulty stipulate that bags must be thrown over a rope or stick supported on top of jumping standards, which are placed midway between mats. A bag striking the stick or passing underneath does not count.

Circle Piling
(Adapted to classes of 12 to 30.)

Divide class into two equal teams. Form each team into a circle of such size that men can just touch finger tips and draw a large circle in front of toes. Stack up half the bags in each circle in front of No. I. At the signal they are passed around (one at a time) as rapidly as possible, till they reach No. 8 (or the man at right of No. I), who stacks them up unaided. The more bags the better. The completed stack must stand alone and only one bag must touch the floor. The side that stacks first wins that round. In the next round No. 8 starts the bags and No. 7 piles up, etc., until everybody has had a turn at stacking.

Quick Passing in a Circle
(Classes of 3 to 30.)

This is not competitive. Place men at easy reaching distance in one or two circles. Start two or three bags around, passing as rapidly as possible. Work for speed. As skill increases add one bag and another until the number of bags approximates the number of men in circle. There is more work in this than would appear.


Competitive Relay Race

(Six men and upward.)

Divide class in two teams. Place half of each team at one end of the floor (on a line) and half at the other end. The bag is carried across the room once by each member of the team and delivered to the man at the opposite side. The last man carries it over the opposite line. The team finishing first wins. A man should not cross his line till the bag reaches him.


Single Line Passing

(10 to 30 players.)

Form two teams of e.g. eight men as in figure, the end man standing a little to one side. No. 1 has a bag and at the signal runs toward No. 8, throwing it as he runs. No. 2 steps into No. 1's place. The bag passes from hand to hand, from 8 to 2 the whole line moves up one place and No. 3 runs down, etc.

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After No. 8, in his turn, has run down with the bag, every man will have run and all will be in original position, and when No. 1 receives the bag again, that game is done. The team which first gets the bag around to No. 1 in his own position wins. Until the game is well learned, the end men should always be behind their line when the bag is received. The bag should be held up at arm's length as a signal that the game is done.

Double Line Passing

This is the best game, as from 8 to 40 players can be kept busy and interested. Divide the class into two squads, which are placed facing each other on two parallel lines (chalk) as far apart as the size of the room will admit. The greater the distance, the better, but the lines should be at least six feet from the wall. If the teams are large or contain an odd number of men, put one or two more men at the further end than at the starting point. Figure 3 represents one team of nine men. Another similar team makes competition. No. 1 has a bag and at the signal runs, tossing the bag to No. 9. The bag passes through the hands of each man to No. 5, who makes a running toss to No. 4, and the second round will begin with No. 2

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running down. With every succeeding round each man moves one place in the direction of the arrows. After the fifth round, No. 1 will be where No. 5 was at first. No. 1 will then run up with the bag and finally, after nine rounds, he will be back in his original position, and when the bag reaches him here, he holds it up in token of a finish. The team accomplishing this first wins. It will aid both spectators and judges if No. 1 ties a handkerchief about his arm. After the game is learned, or if the teams are large enough, put two bags in circulation thus: Give Nos. 1 and 2 each a bag (see Fig. 3). The first bag starts as before and the instant it starts up in the hands of No. 5 (not before) No. 2 starts down with the second. The game ends when Nos. 1 and 2 have received the bags in their original positions. Now the game takes only half as much time as before and every man gets twice as much work in the same time. In learning the game, the runner should not cross his line till the bag is in his hand, but after a little practice No. 5, for example, may start when the bag has reached No. 7 (see Fig. 3), receive it on the run from No. 6 and deliver it, while still running, to No. 4. This running start can, with practice, be reduced to a nicety, but should be closely watched, not allowing the runner to start too soon and stand midway between the lines waiting for the bag. Careless play would soon appear. Guard against it by scoring thus: Give the winning team 2 points and score a team 1 for every time a bag touches the floor, either on account of a poor throw or a bad catch. Play three or five games and add up the points. (Keep score on the floor with chalk.) This method of scoring puts a premium on careful playing, for a team that wins, but makes two errors, will be no better off than a team which plays slower, but without errors. There should be one umpire for each team to count the errors, and a scorer who may also be judge of finish.

Instead of competition between teams, it is always of interest for one team to play against time as taken with a stop watch. Much enthusiasm is aroused in reducing time to a minimum. Any live physical director can devise other uses for the bags, but the above games have been thoroughly tested and found useful. Some of them have been played day after day by permanent teams with continued interest. They cannot be successfully played with medicine balls, for the balls cannot be grasped with the hand.


Stake Guard

(Mind and Body, Vol. 2.)

The good old game of "Duck on the Rock" can be splendidly adapted to indoors by the use of these sacks, as follows:

The players select a "guard" by throwing their sacks from a distance of about twenty feet to within a square of from 8 to 12 feet, in the centre of which stands an Indian Club. The player whose sack lands farthest from the club becomes guard. The guard now places his sack on the club, the other players meanwhile retiring to the starting line. Upon a given signal, all players endeavor to hit the club or the sack upon it, in order either to upset the club or to throw the sack off, the guard in turn quickly replacing club and sack and then tagging any player whom he can reach within the lines of his square. If he succeeds in tagging a player, then he must in turn seek to escape from the square before the new guard (the player who was tagged) can place his sack on the club. The players who succeed in getting their sacks without being tagged may throw or hurl their sacks from the starting line as often as opportunity offers, the unsuccessful players lingering near the square to await their opportunity for grasping sacks. (It is preferable to continue throwing the sacks simultaneously, upon a given signal after each displacement of the sack.) After awhile the throwing distance may be increased, in order to make the game more interesting, it frequently occurring that the players do not succeed in displacing the guard's sack, when it behooves him to be careful lest some one enters his trust—a misdirected run not infrequently freeing all players who stand around, watching an opportunity to regain their sacks. The square can also be made smaller than stated above to help the guard or to secure better play or aim.
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GYMNASIUM OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

This Gymnasium has been completely outfitted by Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros. The above picture shows all the various pieces of apparatus in place for squad work.

Indoor Outdoor Gymnastics p81.jpg

GYMNASIUM OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

This picture shows how quickly the Spalding apparatus can be removed from the sockets, etc., leaving a clear floor for mass work, basket ball games, etc.


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.


The author died in 1969, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 30 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.

 

  1. *The articles in this book taken from "Gymnastics: a Text Book of German American Gymnastics," by William A. Stecher, and published under the auspices of the North American Gymnastic Union (Lee & Shepard, Boston, price $3.00), are copyrighted and used by permission.
  2. Used by permission from the publishers, Henry Holt & Co., New York.