John Jay Johns Journal/1866-1870

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Jan. 1, 1866. Made a contract with Aunt Katy (colored) at eighty-four dollars a year or seven dollars per month, clothe herself and pay doctor's bills.

Mar. 11, 1866. My daughter, Louisa (Mrs. Morgan) left on the steamboat "Cornelia" today for Cambridge on Missouri River.

Mar. 17, 1866. Mrs. Durfee and George arrived from Philadelphia.

Apr. 30, 1866. I made a trip to High Hill in Montgomery County on the North Missouri R. R. to attend a meeting of Presbytery. It is a very pretty country, fine for grass and stock.

June 16, 1866. My brother Alfred and family arrived.

Aug. 20, 1866. The cholera has been raging in St. Louis for two weeks.

Aug. 29, 1866. My brother and family left here for the South today, his health greatly improved.

Sept. 25, 1866. My old negro man Jack died last night. He had an attack of cholera several days ago and finally sunk under it.

Oct. 10, 1866. Wheat selling in town at $2.50 for bushel.

Nov. 6, 1866. Calvit Johns, my nephew, left here today.

Feb. 12, 1867. Went to St. Louis with R. Pourie to get a plan for a church. J.J.J was heavily involved in the First Presbyterian Church, St. Charles, MO. SDC 1/26/1999

Apr. 7, 1867. A bright Sabbath. Mr. Farris, our minister, returned from New orleans yesterday and preached today. This would be Robert P. Farris. SDC 1/26/1999

June 24, 1867. Today Arthur began at Garvin's.

Aug. 1, 1867. Today I had a sale of stock and farming implements which closed our my farming operation. (Afterwards rented to tenants)

Aug. 30, 1867. I left today to take my son, Frederic to Westminster College in Fulton, Callaway County. Several other gentlemen and their sons went with us.

Sept. 3, 1867. Returned today from Fulton. We had a very pleasant trip. Passed through Mexico. Saw some beautiful country. The college promises to be very full. The President, Dr. Fisher, is a very interesting man.

Oct. 16, 1867. I returned yesterday after an absence of two weeks on a visit to my daughter, Mrs. Morgan, in Lafayette County in this state and also to a meeting of the Synod in Lexington in that county. My visit was a very delightful one and I say the most beautiful country I ever saw and the richest.

Jan. 1, 1868. Sabbath - mild, thawing, cloudy. Today our congregation entered their new church for the first time. We hope the Lord will make the place a very Bethel by his presence and power to save and comfort his people. Snowstorms in the evening.

Jan. 29, 1868. We have been holding religious meetings in our church for a week. They have been very interesting and profitable to God's people, and I hope, to some unpenitent persons, under the ministration of that faithful servant of Christ, Dr. Robert Nall of Alabama.

Feb. 6, 1868. The religious meetings have continued up to this time with increasing interest under Dr. Nall's preaching. More than twenty persons have manifested religious concern and we hope a good many have been brought to Christ.

Oct. 30, 1868. My daughter Louisa (Mrs. Morgan) left for her new home in Carroll County two days ago, after a visit of two months. Great excitement over the Presidential election through the country. Each party thinks the country will be ruined unless they are successful. Nothing but the good Providence of God can save this country from ruin.

Dec. 31, 1868. Fred commences his services in the bank as messenger and clerk.

Jan. 1, 1869. I have again to record the goodness of God to us as a family during the past year. We have had our wants bountifully supplied, and above all, all we have enjoyed many precious spiritual blessings. Some of our children have been brought into the kingdon of God as we hope. What a debt of gratitude we owe our Heavenly Father.

July 4, 1869. Sabbath, cloudy, smoky, damp day. The German Turners and infidels are celebrating the Fourth with music, dancing and drinking.

Aug. 7, 1869. Clear and cool. This is the day of the great ecliplse of the sun. Just about four oclock p.m., as was calculated, the eclipse began. At 5 o'clock it was almost total, looked like twilight, only there was a strange, sombre appearance, quite unnatural. Nature shows signs of uneasiness when the sun hides his light in that way. How grand and solemn is such a sight, and how wonderful that man can calculate with certainty years beforehand such an event.

Aug. 23, 1869. Miss Mary Pourie, a lovely young lady, died yesterday (Sunday) we hear.

Oct. 7, 1869. Fred left today for Texas.

Oct. 12, 1869. I left home to attend the Synod of Missouri at Palmyra, Mo. We went to St. Louis on the Packet Boat to Hannibal. We had a delightful trip. Large number of ministers and elders on the boat. Had preaching twice. Palmyra is a very pretty town 14 miles from the river on the Hannibal & St. Joe R. R. The Synod was large. Very harmonious and pleasant. We returned by Quincy. That is the most beautiful city I ever saw.

Nov. 4, 1869. Lizzie and Henry Gauss married today.

Apr. 15, 1869. Returned today from the meeting of Presbytery at the Maline Church in St. Louis County.

July 3, 1870. Dr. N. L. Rice preached for us today on Justification, in the morning and, Faith, in the evening. He is a model preacher.

Aug. 20, 1870. Norhtern Lights were seen last night. Fred Arrived from South four days ago.

Aug. 22, 1870. Our dear little Blanche died tonight, a little before seven o'clock. She was sick eight days.

Sept. 5, 1870. Fred and Arthur left today for college in Massassachusetts.

Oct. 1, 1870. Mrs. Borden, my wife's sister, and Annie Durfee, came about the 15th of September and spent two weeks with us and left for home two days ago and took Mrs. Glenday with them.

Nov. 14, 1870. The Reverend Edward Martin began his labors as pastor of our church yesterday (Sabbath).