Literary Research Guide

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The Literary Research Guide was an annotated guide to selected reference sources essential to the study of British literature, literatures of the United States, other literatures in English, and related topics. It was discontinued in December 2017.

It was written by the late James L. Harner from 1989 through the sixth edition in 2014 and then updated by Angela Courtney. This repository contains the sixth edition’s HTML, XML (DocBook v4.5), and CSS. The Modern Language Association invites you to use this code under the guidelines of this repository’s CC-BY 4.0 license.

How to Attribute[edit]

If you use this code to publish a new version of the Literary Research Guide, the Modern Language Association asks that any such version include the following disclaimer:

This version of the Literary Research Guide is based on the sixth edition, published by the Modern Language Association in 2014. The Modern Language Association has since made the HTML, XML, and CSS of this edition available on GitHub under the terms of a CC-BY 4.0 license. The Modern Language Association did not create this version and is not responsible for the contents, display, accessibility, or any other aspect of it.

Contents[edit]

  1. Research Methods
  2. Guide to Reference Works
  3. Literary Handbooks, Dictionaries, and Encyclopedias
  4. Bibliographies of Bibliographies
  5. Libraries and Library Catalogs
  6. Guides to Manuscripts and Archives
  7. Serial Bibliographies, Indexes, and Abstracts
  8. Guides to Dissertations and Theses
  9. Internet Resources
  10. Biographical Sources
  11. Periodicals
  12. Genres
  13. English Literature
  14. Irish Literature
  15. Scottish Literature
  16. Welsh Literature
  17. American Literature
  18. Other Literatures in English
  19. Foreign Language Literatures
  20. Comparative Literature
  21. Literature-Related Topics and Sources

This work is released under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license, which allows free use, distribution, and creation of derivatives, so long as the license is unchanged and clearly noted, and the original author is attributed.