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Lost Face

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Lost Face  (1910) 
by Jack London

1910 first edition of a collection of seven short stories by Jack London, with illustrations

LOST FACE

BY

JACK LONDON

AUTHOR OF "MARTIN EDEN," "THE CALL
OF THE WILD," ETC.

ILLUSTRATED

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
1910

Lost Face (1910) frontispiece.jpg

"'Who will buy a wife?' she asked."

See page 214.

ILLUSTRATIONS
"'Who will buy a wife?' she asked" Frontispiece
FACING PAGE
"He sat in the snow, arms tied behind him" 4
"'I laugh at you and your strength. Strike, and strike hard'" 26
"After that, Churchill fought on alone" 44
"As he looked apathetically about him, his eyes chanced on the dog" 88
"'But I have lived'" 202

Macmillan Company logo 1913.svg

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO
ATLANTA • SAN FRANCISCO

MACMILLAN & CO., Limited

LONDON • BOMBAY • CALCUTTA
MELBOURNE

THE MACMILLAN CO. OF CANADA, Ltd.

TORONTO

Copyright, 1910,
By THE MACMILLAN COMPANY.


Set up and electrotyped. Published March, 1910.

Norwood Press
J. S. Cushing Co.—Berwick & Smith Co.
Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.

[Advertisements]

Jack London's Novels
Each, cloth, 12mo, $1.50

MARTIN EDEN

"The story possesses substance, form, vigor, and vitality as does everything that Mr. London writes. It is filled with the wine of life, with a life that Mr. London has himself lived, and to which he never wearies of giving every part of himself."—Boston Evening Transcript.

"The book is worth a thousand of the ordinary novel of society and is written with force and feeling, vigor and glow."—Chicago Tribune.

THE SEA-WOLF

"'The Sea- Wolf,' Jack London's latest novel of adventure, is one that every reader with good red blood in his veins will hail with delight. There is no fumbling of the trigger here, no nervous and uncertain sighting along the barrel, but the quick decisive aim and the bull's eye every time."—Mail and Express, New York.

THE CALL OF THE WILD

"Even the most listless reader will be stirred by the virile force of the story, the strong sweeping strokes with which the pictures of the northern wilds and the life therein are painted by the narrator, and the insight given into the soul of the primitive in nature. . . . More than that, it is one of the very best stories of the year, and one that will not be forgotten."—The Plain Dealer, Cleveland.

WHITE FANG

"Mr. London's vigorous incisive style, unconventionality, and sympathetic understanding of Nature and of her children in the rough, never combined to better advantage than in 'White Fang' . . . a splendid story, but it is more than a story it is a wonderful study in animal nature and development."—New York Times Saturday Review.


PUBLISHED BY
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
64–66 Fifth Avenue, New York

Jack London's Short Stories
Each, cloth, illustrated, 12mo, $1.50

THE GAME

A Transcript from Real Life

"It is told with such a glow of imaginative illusion, with such intense dramatic vigor, with such effective audacity of phrase, that it almost seems as if the author's appeal was to the bodily eye as much as to the inner mentality, and that the events are actually happening before the reader."—The New York Herald.

CHILDREN OF THE FROST

"Told with something of that same vigorous and honest manliness and indifference with which Mr. Kipling makes unbegging yet direct and unfailing appeal to the sympathy of his reader."—Richmond Despatch.

THE FAITH OF MEN

"Mr. London's art as a story-teller nowhere manifests itself more strongly than in the swift, dramatic close of his stories. There is no hesitancy or uncertainty of touch. From the start the story moves straight to the inevitable conclusion."—Courier Journal.

MOON FACE

"Each of the stories is unique in its individual way, weird and uncanny, and told in Mr. London's vigorous, compelling style."—Interior.

TALES OF THE FISH PATROL

"That they are vividly told, hardly need be said, for Jack London is a realist as well as a writer of thrilling romances."—Cleveland Plain Dealer.

LOVE OF LIFE

"Jack London is at his best with the short story … clear-cut, sharp, incisive, with the tang of the frost in it."—Record-Herald, Chicago.


PUBLISHED BY
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
64–66 Fifth Avenue, New York

Jack London's Social Studies

PEOPLE OF THE ABYSS Illustrated, cloth, $1.50 net "This life has been pictured many times before compla- cently and soothingly by Professor Walter A. Wyckoff, luridly by Mr. Stead, scientifically by Mr. Charles Booth. But Mr. London alone has made it real and present to us." The Independent.

THE WAR OF THE CLASSES Cloth, i2mo, $1.30 net " Mr. London's book is thoroughly interesting, and Mr. London's point of view is, as may be surmised, very different from that of the closet theorist." Springfield Republican.

THE ROAD My Life in the Underworld Illustrated, cloth, i2mo, $2.00 net As a literal record of life among tramps, of travel from end to end of the country by exercise of wits, living the life and bearing the penalties of being a vagrant, its significance is great.

THE KEMPTON-WACE LETTERS By Jack London and Anna Strunsky Cloth, i2mo, $ijo " They are not exactly love letters, but letters about the nature of love, and what part romantic love plays and what part it ought to play in our modern life." Portland Advertiser.

THE IRON HEEL A Novel Cloth, izmo, $1.50 " Power is certainly the keynote of this book. Every word tingles with it ; it is so strong that it is almost brutal. But it is a great book, one that deserves to be read and pondered. . . . The lift of the book sweeps the reader to his feet; it contains a mighty lesson and a most impressive warning." Indianapolis News.

PUBLISHED BY THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 64-66 Fifth Avenue, New York Gertrude Atherton's

TOWER OF IVORY Cloth, Z2 mo, $,.30 The scene of this new novel by the author of " The Conqueror " " The Splendid Idle Forties," etc., is laid partly in Munich, partly in London, and partly in the English country. The hero is a young Englishman, representing a type which has never before been studied in any novel of importance, but the actual existence of which will not be questioned by those who know English life well. The heroine is an American girl who becomes a prima donna; the greatest dramatic singer of her time. Among the subsidiary characters are Americans, Englishmen, Germans, Russians, and Italians.

Winston Churchill's A MODERN CHRONICLE Illustrated, cloth, I2mo, $f.jo The scene of this story is laid largely in New York City, and the characters are types of American men and women that are thoroughly significant of society in the United States.

Mary S. Watts' NATHAN BURKE Cloth, i2mo,*i. 50 Nathan Burke starts life as an untaught backwoodsman, and Mrs. Watts follows his career as he grows with the growth of the new country. The story is decidedly American; in fact, its Americanness is one of its distinguishing qualities. The period is that great age of expansion and development preced- ing the civil war, and the scene is laid in Ohio.

James Lane Allen's A BROOD OF THE EAGLE In preparation As in others of Mr. Allen's stories, the scene of " A Brood of the Eagle " is rural Kentucky. The theme of the novel is the noble but unfortunate love of a country doctor, which carried to its conclusion settles the future of the doctor's life and involves that of one of his children.

PUBLISHED BY THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 64-66 Fifth Avenue, New York



This work was published before January 1, 1927, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.