Memoirs of a Trait in the Character of George III. of these United Kingdoms

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search


MEMOIRS

OF

A TRAIT IN THE CHARACTER

OF

GEORGE III.

OF THESE UNITED KINGDOMS;

AUTHENTICATED BY OFFICIAL PAPERS AND PRIVATE
LETTERS IN POSSESSION OF THE AUTHOR:

WITH AN

APPENDIX OF ILLUSTRATIVE TRACTS, &c.

ABRIDGED FROM THE ORIGINAL WORK IN MANUSCRIPT.


By JOHAN HORRINS, Gent.


Lend me thy clarion, Goddess! let me try
To sound the praise of merit ere it dies.

Shenstone.


LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY W. EDWARDS, 12, AVE MARIA LANE;
SOLD BY OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH,
AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS.


MDCCCXXXV.



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface iii
Dedication and Table of Contents xli
Chapter XIII 1
Chapter XIV 18
Chapter XV 43
Chapter XVI 69

APPENDIX
No. 1. Remarks on a Pamphlet published under the authority of the Board of Longitude 89
No. 2. A letter to Dr. Demainbury (the King's Astronomer at Richmond) 191
No. 3. Voyage in the Deptford man of war to Madeira, and from Madeira to Jamaica—accuracy of the Timekeeper; and the return, with a very tempestuous passage, in the Merlin sloop 201
No. 4. A letter from Lieutenant A. Howe, on the comparative merits of the Lunar process for finding the Longitude, and that by Chronometry 206
No. 5. A quotation from a periodical.—A digression in blank verse, on the fate of Sir Cloudesley Shovel, and some remarks on monumental honours 208
No. 6. On the character of Mr. George Graham 214
No. 7. Some remarks on the respective characters of George 3rd and Dr. Samuel Johnson; suggested by Mr. Croker's annotations on the biography of the Moralist 220
No. 8. A Note on Junius and Wolcot 229
No. 9. Anecdotes of George IV. when Prince of Wales. 238
No. 10. Observations on the injurious and oppressive effects of a claim under the copy-right Act from eleven colleges or libraries 252



ERRATA.
Page 64, line 3rd in the Note—for latter read letter.
138, at the bottom—for Orxford read Orford.
160, line 7th from the bottom—for profound read profund.
174, line 7th in the Note—for after read often.
224, line 5th—for from America read from North America.

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.