Page:A Hebrew and English Lexicon (Brown-Driver-Briggs).djvu/239

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page needs to be proofread.


ton

"* — prob. for the sake of removing gramm. anomalies : five instances of the converse change, viz. of N s n to be read as WH, occur for a similar reason, 1K1J 11 (JWTjflWl 73KJ11 to be read as WWpiWl 73KJ11, on account of the fern, verb) f 73 16 Jb 3i llb (fiy K*HI HD1 Kin "3 D'Wfi to be read as D^S J1JJ KW1 HOT NV1 »3), Ec 5 8 1 Ch2 9 16 . The origin of the peculiarity in the Pent, is uncertain. It can hardly be a real archaism : for the fact that Arab., Aram., & Eth. have distinct forms for masc. & fern, shews that both must have formed part of the original Semitic stock, and consequently of Hebrew as well, from its earliest existence as an independent language. Nor is the peculiarity confined to the Pent.: in the MS. of the Later Prophets, of a.d. 916, now at S. Petersburg, published in facsimile by Strack (1876), the fern, occurs written KW (see the passages cited in the Adnotationes Criticae, p. 026). In Ph. both masc. and fem. are alike written Kn (CIS i. i 9 Kn pix i?d, l. 13 Kn ji3k?d, 3 10 Kn dik, ." Kn 1137DD, 93 2 94 2 ), though naturally this would be read as hu or hi' as occasion required. Hence, as © shews that in the older Heb. MSS. the scriptio plena was not yet generally intro- duced, it is prob. that originally Kn was written for both genders in Hebrew likewise, and that the epicene Kin in the Pent, originated at a comparatively late epoch in the transmission of the text — perh. in connexion with the assump- tion, which is partly borne out by facts (cf. De ZKWL 1880. pp. ao-39.^ tha( . £„ th(J J der l anguage fem. forms were more sparingly used than sub- sequently.) In usage WH (f. OTlj pi. nan, BTJ, njn : v. nsn) is 1. an emph. he (she, it, they), some- times equivalent to himself (herself, itself, themselves) , or (esp. with the art.) that (those) : a. Gn 3 1S e>K"i 1B1B" Kin he (® alrbs) shall bruise thee as to the head (opp. to the foil. nnK thou), v 20 for she (and no one else) was the mother of all living (so oft. in causal sentences, where some emph. on the subject is desirable, as Ju 14 3 + 24 s 25 15 33* 91 3 103 14 148 5 Jb 5 18 n 11 28 24 Je 5 5 34 7b Ho 6 1 n 10 : Dr 1814 ' 18 ), 4 20 Adah bare Jabal CTpnK 3t* ^K tWI NW he (iKeivos) was the father of tent-dwellers, v 21 io 8 he began to be a mighty one in the earth, 20 s (<iirris), Ju 13 s Is 32 7 33 s2 2K I4'- 22 - 25 ; Ho io 2 he — the unseen observer of their thoughts and deeds (Che), I3 13b (he, the foe figured by the E. wind). (For its use thus in circ. clauses v. LViOT.iM.rau*) And where the predic. is a subst. or ptcp., Gn 2 11 • . . 3?Dn Wn that is the one which encompasseth etc., v 1314 io 12 that is NIPT the great city. So in the explanatory notices, Gn 14 3 nban d> Kin that is the salt sea, v 8 nyiTKln (hat is Zoar, 36' + oft. b. pointing back to the subj. and contrasting it with something else: G114 4 Kin"DJ 73n Abel, he also ... v 2 * io 21 20 5 Kin-DJ-K'm and she, herself also said, Ex i" -foft. C. appended alone to avert (more rarely, but always with intentional emphasis), Ex 4 14 I know Kin "fflp 131 »3 that he can speak, v" 1 S 22 18 D"jn33 Kin y:en and hu (though none else would do it) smote the priests, 23 s2 for one hath told me, Sin D"iy: Di« He can deal sub- tilly, Ezi2 12 (peculiarly),* cf. Dr 4100 "-: very rarely indeed to a noun Nu 1 8 s3 Kin '•Ijn f Is 7" Kin Est 9 1 (nen) being probably all the exx. in the OT. d. Gn 1 3 1 and Abram came up out of Egypt, Wt?K1 KW himself and his wife, and all that he had, 14 16 Vjajn Kin he and his servants, 19 30 ; so very oft. e. prefixed to a noun (very rare, and mostly late), Ex 1 2*' 2b Ez 3 8 & 33" JIBn Kin ■ to pr. names Ex 6" pnKI ntPD Kin, 1 Ch 26 M that Shelomoth, 27 s 2Ch28 22 32 12 (diff. from 2 K 18 22 ), v 30 33 s3 Ezr 7": cf. Dn Ne io 38 (comp. in Syr. o'o., Nb f227 ): cf. ^87* 1 S 20 29 . 2. It resumes the subj. with emph. : a. when the predic. is a verb (esp. if it be separated from its subject by an interven- ing clause), Gn 15 4 but one that shall come forth out of thine own bowels, I^T? &W1 he shall be thy heir, 3 12 the woman whom thou gavest to be with me, 17 nyi3 Kin she gave to me, 24' 44 17 etc. Ju 7 4 2 S 14 19 (throwing stress on 3trt') 1 Ch n-° Is 33 1S " 16 34 16 38" 47 10 59 16 63 s Ho 7 8 ; oft. inPr, as io 1822 - 24 1 1 28 ^ 13 ^ 21 22 9 24 12 ; 1 S 1 13 (v. Dr), ^ 68 s6 . b. when the predic. is a noun, Gn 2 14 and the fourth river, n"lS Kin it was the Euphrates, v 19 9 18 15 s 42" Mn'ejDi'l Bwn and Joseph, he was the ruler etc. : in sentences of the type Wfyfln Kin ' Drtan Kin "< D?" 5 , V^tO «W 'i, Dts 22 "4* f io 9 Jos 13 1 " 3 Is 9 14 33" Ho 1 1 5 (in these cases, to avoid stiff- ness, it is convenient often to drop the pron. in translating, as ' And the fourth river was the Euphrates:' the pronoun, however, though it then corresponds to the substantive verb in English, does not really express it, the copula, as the exx. shew, being in fact understood. Sts. in AV the pron. is retained for emphasis, as Dt. II. cc.) So c. after "KM? in an affirmative sentence, Gn 9 3 all creeping things 'PTKln "KM? which are living, Lv n 39 Nu 9 13 14 8 35 31 't'X ni»^> yen Kin who is guilty of death, Dt 20 20

S io 19 Hg i 9 al. (On 2, cf. Dr» 

. with 04.. . Where, however, the pron. follows the