Page:A Hebrew and English Lexicon (Brown-Driver-Briggs).djvu/268

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csi ceded, being not unfrequently omitted, 16 14 : cf. Dr' 135 - 6 - 2 ), 30 s 31 s151 Ex 24 s etc. With sf. of 1 ps., esp. in response to a call, indicating the readiness of the person addressed to listen or obey, Here I am! (lit. Behold me!) Gn aa ua 27 118 31" 37" 46 5 Ex 3 4 1 S 3 "- 6JU « 22" 2 S i 7 Is 6 B , cf. 1 S 1 2 3 '? 135) *}|n here I am, answer against me, 14* (cf. Dr" 298 ), 2 S 15 26 (in resig- nation: cf. Gn 44 16 5o 18 Jos 9 25 Ezr 9 15 ): of God Is 52 6 58° 6s 1,1 (repeated for emphasis). In the pi. Win Nu 14 40 Je 3* Jb 38 s6 .— Emph. <?X ♦JJTI Ez 34 11S0 , cf. 6 J . On . . . ^S ^n, v. bx 4, p. 40. b. introducing clauses involving predication : (a) with ref. to the past or present, it points generally to some truth either newly asserted, or newly recognised, Gn i 29 behold! I have given to you all herbs etc. 17 20 27 s 1 S 14 33 etc. ; often one upon which some proposal or suggestion is to be founded, Ex i 9 (cf. JH Gn 11 6 ) 1 S 20 2i 2 K 5 20 . When the proposal is to be of the nature of an entreaty or request, Wnan is often used, instead of the simple nan Gn i"a u 16 2 18 7 1 K 20 31 22 13 al. (v. to), (b) with ref. to the future. Here it serves to introduce a solemn or important declaration Ex 32 s * 34 10 Is 7 14 ; and is used esp. with the ptcp. (the fut. instans, Dr* 136 ' 3 ) in predictions or threats, Gn 20 3 no 1|n (lit.) behold thee (accus.) about to die, thou art about to die, Ex 4 s3 7 17 9 3 Dt 31 17 1 S 3 11 1 K 2c 36 22 28 Is 3 1 io 33 17 1 19 1 22 17 24 1 + oft.; in the phrase nan D<K3 fW 1 1 S 2 31 2 K 20 ,7 =Is 39 6 Am 4 2 8" 9 13 + Je 15 t.; very often with the suffix of 1 ps. sg., as N^t? '??? Behold, I bring (lit. be- hold me bringing, or about to bring) . . . Gn 6 17 Ex io 4 & often, esp. in Je; Gn 9' Ex8 17 9 18 34 11 2K22 20 l8i 3 I7 29 l4 43 19 JeS^n^OiPb W; so 23 s + ) 1 6 16 20 4 ,etc; anomalously, with change of person, Is28 16 "I?? '?JU (ace. to points) behold me, one who lias founded, 29 14 ^IpV ^an behold me, one who will add (so 38 s ); but it is dub. whether the ptcp. "ID fipi' should not be read. c. . . . narn very freq. in historical style, esp. (but not exclusively) after verbs of seeing or discovering, making the narrative graphic and vivid, and enabling the reader to enter into the surprise or satisfaction of the speaker or actor concerned : Gn I 31 and behold, it was very good, 6 12 8 1S 15 12 18 2 37 s9 Ex 2 6 Dt 9" etc.: in the description of a dream Gn37 79 40* 16 4I 12 - 3 IS29 8 , or of a vision Am7 M 8 1 etc. With a ptcp. (the context fixing the sense to the past), Gn 24 30 37" (both without suffix); Ju 9 43 ii 34 1 K i 9 6 " + . d. like II. jn (b), nearly=t/(rare): Lv ig 5 - 6 "- 8 - 9 (& elsewhere in this and the next ch.) nani and behold=and if, Dt 13" and 17 4 MO« njH) and behold it is trae=and if it be true, 19 18 1 S 20' 2 ; cf. 1 S 9' 2Si8 n Ho 9 6 . I. nsn 4> adv. hither (perh. from II. fO, used 8fiKTiKas, with n-loc, prop. Io hitherwards ! or perh. akin to Hi, lift, lift here) — a. of place: {a) hither Gn 15 16 n|P] C«*, 42 16 45 s that you have sold me nan hither, v 813 Jos 2 2 3 9 18 6 2 S i 10 IS57 3 nan «np cm), Je^ 51 s + ; 1 S 20 21 nan} ^BD from thee and hitherwards, i.e. on this side of thee (opp. ntf?ni I 1 ? 1 ?): repeated 2 K 4 s5 nan nntfl nan nrjK once hither and once thitlier=once to and fro; nan} nan hitJier and thither i.e. in different (or opposite) directions, + Jos 8 20 2 K 2 814 1 K 20 40 strangely nan} nan Tpy ^ay Wl lit. and thy servant was a doer of hitherwards and thither irnrds, i.e. was engaged in different directions (Ew S3M ' c treats 71 here as the pron. 3 pi. fem. construed irregularly, cf. njK ripil: but rd. prob. with ® X <S 93 Th Klo ftjh was turning or looking (Ex 2 12 ) for rip]l); n'an-iy even hither, Nu 14 19

S 7 12 2 S 20 16 nan-ny aip, 2 K 8 7 , to this point 

(in a book) Je48 47 51 64 (note of compiler or scribe). (£) here (cf. net? = there) Gn2i s swear to me nan here, Dn 1 2 5 '? nan . . . '? nan on this side of . . . on that side of . . . fb. of time, in nan *1JJ hitherto Gn 15 16 (with a neg., = not ye<) 44 28 Ju 16 13 ijr 71 17 & unttZ mow do

keep declaring thy wonders, 1 Ch 9 18 1 2 9 

until now (the point reached in the narrative). In late Heb., contracted to naiy hitherto, still tEc 4 2 , fjy tEc4 3 n;n i6 fiy iBta^who has not yet been (cf. Mish..^TV. hitherto, still, *<? 1H8 =wo< ye*). II. nari pron. 3 pi. fem. they : v. nen . nrorr v. sub ma. t t~: tQjn n.pr.m. (deriv. & mng. dub.; ace. to Sim Bo Gf al.= wailing, Ar. ^S, fr. cries of children (v. infr.), but this improbable) — only in 'JTf T («*^fc & abbrev. 'n 'i, n.pr.loc. of valley S. of Jerusalem, (© (pdpayya 'Ovopi Jos 15 88 Zovvap. 18 16 ; Tauwa V 16 ; Ymfitvdop.

Ch 28 3 , ®L <>ap. Btmnop; ye (Save 'Ewo/i 33 s , 

®L yfj Bevevvop.; elsewh. USU. (pap. (vlov)'Evvop,) — cf. sub N'?; — as mere topographical term D3n"|3 ^ boundary between Judah & Benjamin